Ellen G. White Writings

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Selected Messages Book 2, Page 344

given them this lifelong inheritance. For this reason, if there were no other, there should be no intermarriage between the white and the colored race.—Manuscript 7, 1896.

Answer to an Inquiry

Dear Friend,

In reply to inquiries regarding the advisability of intermarriage between Christian young people of the white and black races, I will say that in my earlier experience this question was brought before me, and the light given me of the Lord was that this step should not be taken; for it is sure to create controversy and confusion. I have always had the same counsel to give. No encouragement to marriages of this character should be given among our people. Let the colored brother enter into marriage with a colored sister who is worthy, one who loves God, and keeps His commandments. Let the white sister who contemplates uniting in marriage with the colored brother refuse to take this step, for the Lord is not leading in this direction.

Time is too precious to be lost in controversy that will arise over this matter. Let not questions of this kind be permitted to call our ministers from their work. The taking of such a step will create confusion and hindrance. It will not be for the advancement of the work or for the glory of God.—Letter 36, 1912.

The Lord looks upon the creatures He has made with compassion, no matter to what race they may belong. God “hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth.” Speaking to His disciples the Saviour said, “All ye are brethren.” God is our common Father, and each one of us is our brother’s keeper.—The Review and Herald, January 21, 1896.

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