Ellen G. White Writings

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Child Guidance, Page 193

Chapter 36—Advantage of the Early Years

Early Childhood Is the Most Important Period—Too much importance cannot be placed on the early training of children. The lessons that the child learns during the first seven years of life have more to do with forming his character than all that it learns in future years.1Manuscript 2, 1903.

From babyhood the character of the child is to be molded and fashioned in accordance with the divine plan. Virtues are to be instilled into his opening mind.2The Signs of the Times, September 25, 1901.

The parents’ work must begin with the child in its infancy, that it may receive the right impress of character ere the world shall place its stamp on mind and heart.3The Review and Herald, August 30, 1881.

The Most Susceptible Age—It is during the first years of a child's life that his mind is most susceptible to impressions either good or evil. During these years decided progress is made in either a right direction or a wrong one. On one hand, much worthless information may be gained; on the other, much solid, valuable knowledge. The strength of intellect, the substantial knowledge, are possessions which the gold of Ophir could not buy. Their price is above gold or silver.4Counsels to Parents, Teachers, and Students, 132.

First Impressions Are Seldom Forgotten—Neither infants, children, or youth should hear an impatient word from father, mother, or any member of the household; for they receive impressions very early in life, and what parents make them today, they will be tomorrow, and the next day, and the next. The first lessons impressed upon the child are seldom forgotten....

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