Ellen G. White Writings

<< Back Forward >>

«Back «Prev. Pub. «Ch «Pg   Pg» Ch» Next Pub.» Forward»

Counsels on Health, Page 147

in their efforts, they send them away, with, “It is no use, you can't do this or that. You perplex and trouble me more than you help me.”

Thus the first efforts of the learners are repulsed, and the first failure so cools their interest and ardor to learn that they dread another trial and will propose to sew, knit, clean house, anything but cook....

Mothers should take their daughters with them into the kitchen and patiently educate them. Their constitution will be better for such labor; their muscles will gain tone and strength, and their meditations will be more healthy and elevated at the close of the day. They may be weary, but how sweet is rest after a proper amount of labor. Sleep, nature's sweet restorer, invigorates the weary body and prepares it for the next day's duties. Do not intimate to your children that it is no matter whether they labor or not. Teach them that their help is needed, that their time is of value, and that you depend on their labor.

Unwholesome Bread

When I have been from home sometimes, I have known that the bread upon the table, and the food generally, would hurt me; but I would be obliged to eat a little to sustain life. It is a sin in the sight of heaven to have such food. I have suffered for want of proper food. For a dyspeptic stomach, you may place upon your tables fruits of different kinds, but not too many at one meal. In this way you may have a variety, and it will taste good, and after you have eaten your meals, you will feel well.—Testimonies for the Church 2:373 (1869).

«Back «Prev. Pub. «Ch «Pg   Pg» Ch» Next Pub.» Forward»