Ellen G. White Writings

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Counsels on Health, Page 413

of individuals and even imitating the words uttered in meeting; sacred things were made the subject of jest. Young men and young women were severely criticized; courtship and marriage were dwelt upon in a low, disgusting manner. There was scarcely a serious word spoken; the conversation was of a character to debase the mind and taint the morals, and all retired without committing themselves to God.

Waves of Influence

You may never know the result of your influence from day to day, but be sure that it is exerted for good or evil. Many who have a kind heart and good impulses permit their attention to be absorbed in worldly business or pleasure, while the souls that look to them for guidance drift on to hopeless wreck. Such persons may have a high profession and may stand well in the opinion of men, even as Christians, but in the day of God, when our works shall be compared with the divine law, then it will be found that they have not come up to the standard. Others who saw their course fell a little below them, and still others fell below the latter class, and thus the work of degeneracy went on.

Throw a pebble into the lake and a wave is formed, and another and another; and as they increase, the circle widens until they reach the very shore. Thus our influence, though apparently insignificant, may continue to extend far beyond our knowledge or control.—The Review and Herald, January 24, 1882.

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