Ellen G. White Writings

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Manuscript Releases, vol. 21 [Nos. 1501-1598], Page 312

MR No. 1566—The Ings Invited to Join the Work in England

(Written May 26, 1886, from Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland, to Brother and Sister Ings.)

We have been traveling among the churches with my own team. Left Basel May 20 and journeyed two days to Tramelan. Oh, what scenery! No one can tell what Switzerland is unless they have traveled over the road by horse and carriage. I spoke three times in Tramelan. There is a goodly number there. Eleven came from this place and we had a good meeting. Brother John Vuilleumier was my interpreter.

Monday we drove to Bienne in company with Mary Roth and her brother, Oscar, and Sarah McEnterfer. We rode fifteen miles over the most beautiful road and viewed the most majestic scenery my eye ever looked upon. But this letter is not to describe scenery but to state a few things.

I spoke at Bienne in the missionary meeting, then W. C. White spoke. Mary Roth was our interpreter. Today we have come thirty miles and the scenery was such as to delight the senses all the way. For miles we were steadily climbing until we could view the landscape from the elevated point where we now are. I am glad we have a good strong horse and a good, easy, convenient carriage. I am being much benefited by my journey.

I started in this letter to say that as yet we have spent but a very little time in England. We design to start in two weeks for Sweden and Norway, and then shall go to England. The plan now is that our European conference will be in England. We shall stay some time and labor in England. Then if you come, Brother and Sister Ings, we purpose to have a family together and unite our interests and will have a comfortable home, convenient food, and try to help one another. I must spend considerable of my remaining stay in England, if I can endure the climate. If I cannot, shall go where I can, but I am desirous to work in England. I long to speak without a translator. And if I spend much time in England, shall take my horse and my carriage with me.

But I will say, Do just that which the Lord directs. Do not move upon anyone's light, but study duty. You are on the ground and you can know the situation. Ask God for light, and then do your duty with an eye single to His glory.

We would not urge your coming, but we do feel that it would be in the order of God for you both to visit Europe at this time. We cannot advise Brother Ings to come without his

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