Ellen G. White Writings

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Manuscript Releases, vol. 21 [Nos. 1501-1598], Page 355

MR No. 1576—Meetings in Melbourne and Vicinity; Commercial Work at the Echo Office; Charge Adequate Tuition

(Written April 21, 1898, from Stanmore, Sydney, N.S.W., to Brethren Irwin, Evans, Smith, and Jones.)

I received your letter, and will write a few lines now.

I was solicited to visit Melbourne before the tent would have to be taken down, but on account of the severe heat they dared not make the request too urgent. Elder Robinson thought my testimony must be given, as it was greatly needed. He and his wife were left to bear the responsibility of the work, giving Bible readings, conducting the Mission, and training several young men and women as workers. The work has rested heavily upon them. Sister Robinson has hired a girl to do her housework and is doing work every way as taxing as that of a minister. The women workers have not received pay, but this will be changed in due time. The cause is now hemmed in for want of means.

Besides having much work to do in council meetings, I spoke in the tent three times each week, riding from North Fitzroy, seven miles and back. I spoke nine times in Melbourne. I then visited Geelong, forty miles from Melbourne, going on the boat. The company there has had little labor. We had profitable meetings. Brother Robinson conducted the Sabbath school and spoke in the morning and evening and on Sunday evening. I spoke in the afternoon both Sabbath and Sunday. These meetings were a blessing to the church. We returned to Melbourne on Monday.

The tent was taken down and much search was made for a hall. We found a very poor hall, where we could hold meeting on the Sabbath, but we could have it only on Saturday as meetings were held there on Sunday by different religious bodies. We felt very sorry, for this was just at the time when souls were deciding for the truth, but it was not safe to keep the tent up because of the strong winds at this time of the year.

Forty in Balaclava have decided to obey the truth. One teacher from Ballarat, an excellent woman, has taken a decided stand, and is one of the very best workers in Balaclava now. A lady employed in Government House has taken the Sabbath. She is a matron in the laundry department. Sister Williams informed Lady Brassey of her change of views and she laid the matter before Lord Brassey. He said that he could not see

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