Ellen G. White Writings

<< Back Forward >>

«Back «Prev. Pub. «Ch «Pg   Pg» Ch» Next Pub.» Forward»

Manuscript Releases, vol. 21 [Nos. 1501-1598], Page 373

MR No. 1579—The Cases of I.C. Day, Stephen Haskell, and Stephen Smith

(Written December 27, 1858, from Battle Creek, Michigan.)

I was shown in vision while at Mansville, New York, the state of things in the east, especially in the States of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. I saw that the course of I.C. Day while among the Messenger advocates was cruel, crooked, and wicked; that people were composed of dissatisfied ones who would not bear reproof, but considered their judgment better than that of their brethren who had an experience in the truth and the cause of God. These unruly spirits came together and united together to work or fight against those whom God had raised up to stand in defense of His truth. Satan and his angels were at war with them, fighting against them, and these people were co-workers with Satan and the evil angels. Falsehoods and lies would be formed by Satan's children, and this people loved them and eagerly reported them to others. I.C. Day was one of these; if he did not make the lies, he loved them.

I saw the angels of God grieved, and they followed their commission to mark every falsehood, every thrust, every stain put upon the defenders of God's truth. Every bitter feeling, every feeling of hate they were to record, for they would meet it again. I saw I.C. Day strengthening the hands of wicked men, trying to tear away the confidence of God's people in us and in the visions.

Then I was shown that as the Messenger people could not make their rebellious feelings and spirit do the work they wished it should—get down the Review—they ceased in a measure from their work. Some gave up the Sabbath, others changed their evil course and fully united with God's people. Others did not see the wickedness of their course and never made thorough work or repented heartily of their evil work. Pardon was written against the names of those who made thorough work, but if they again fall into a like snare and pursue an evil course, all their past evil is remembered against them.

Some, I saw, seemed to others to make thorough work. But that God who reads the heart knew that the seeds of rebellion were within them, and by their names was written, “Unstable souls, who wrest the truth to their own destruction.”

I saw that I.C. Day had never realized that he had been a close co-worker with Satan and his evil angels. If he had realized this he would not have fallen into such a snare. I saw while attending the meeting at Lancaster

«Back «Prev. Pub. «Ch «Pg   Pg» Ch» Next Pub.» Forward»