Ellen G. White Writings

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Testimonies for the Church, vol. 2, Page 137

Chapter 19—Amusements at the Institute

When the amusements were introduced into the Institute, some in ----- manifested their superficial character. They were well pleased and gratified; their frivolous turn of mind was just suited. The things recommended for invalids they thought good for themselves; and Dr. C is not accountable for all the results accruing from the counsel given to his patients. Those in different churches abroad, who were unconsecrated, seized upon the first semblance of an excuse to engage in pleasure, hilarity, and folly. As soon as it was known that the physicians at the Institute had recommended plays and amusements in order to divert the minds of the patients from themselves into a more cheerful train of thought, it went like fire in the stubble; the young in ----- and other churches thought that they had need of just such things, and the armor of righteousness was laid off by many. As they were no longer held in by bit and bridle, they engaged in these things with as much earnestness and perseverance as though everlasting life depended upon their zeal in this direction. Here was an opportunity to discern between the conscientious followers of Christ and those who were self-deceived. Some had not the cause of God at heart. They had not the work of true holiness wrought in the soul. They had failed to make God their trust, and were unstable, and only needed a wave to raise them from their feet and toss them to and fro. Such showed that they possessed but little stability and moral independence. They had not an experience for themselves, and therefore walked in the sparks of others’ kindling. They had not Christ in their hearts to confess to the world. They professed to be His followers, but earthly and

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