Ellen G. White Writings

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SDA Bible Commentary, vol. 7 (EGW), Page 918

because error is clothed with a new garment, which they think covers something wonderful. But let the covering be removed, and nothingness appears (The Review and Herald, February 5, 1901).

20 (Matthew 13:47, 48). Both Good and Bad in the Church—[2 Timothy 2:19, 20 quoted.] The “great house” represents the church. In the church will be found the vile as well as the precious. The net cast into the sea gathers both good and bad (The Review and Herald, February 5, 1901).

21. Empty Vessels Needed—What kind of vessels are meet for the Master's use?—Empty vessels. When we empty the soul of every defilement, we are ready for use (The Review and Herald, February 28, 1899).

Purification an Individual Work—“If a man therefore purge himself from these, he shall be a vessel unto honour, sanctified, and meet for the Master's use, and prepared unto every good work.” He is not to accept theories that, if received, would corrupt. He is to purify himself from all unrighteous sentiments, which, if received, would lead away from the sure Word of God to unstable human devisings, degradation, and corruption. He is to resist the working of the enemy through vessels of dishonor. By searching the Scriptures with much prayer, he will find a path to follow, not the path of man, but a path that leads to heaven.

The work of purification is an individual work. No one can do this work for another. “If a man therefore purge himself from these, he shall be a vessel unto honour, sanctified, and meet for the Master's use.” The Spirit of God will work through sanctified human agencies, leading them to work aright. Ability and grace will be provided. Men will be filled with an earnest desire to preach the truths of the gospel, firmly, decidedly, and in a clear manner (The Review and Herald, February 5, 1901).

23-26 (vs. 14-18; ch. 4:1-5; Colossians 2:8; Revelation 7:3, 4; see EGW on Revelation 3:1-3; 14:1-4). No Place for Prying Curiosity—There are some things which we need to guard. Letters will come asking questions in regard to the sealing of the people of God, who will be sealed, how many, and other prying questions. I think we must tell them to read and speak of the things that are plainly revealed. We have encouragement in the Word that if we walk humbly with God, we shall receive instruction. But prying curiosity is not to be encouraged.

To the second chapter of second Timothy we may refer those who are desirous of originating some new and strange thing, which is the product of the human imagination, and as much below the grand and noble sentiments of Holy Writ as the common is below the sacred. We may answer foolish questions by saying, Wait, and we shall all know what is essential for us to know. Our salvation does not depend on side issues (Letter 58, 1900).

Chapter 3

14, 15 (Acts 16:1-3). Timothy's Childhood Training—Timothy's mother and grandmother were united in their efforts to train him for God. What was his lesson book?—the Bible. Paul, his father in the gospel, declares, “From a child thou hast known the holy scriptures.” The faith of the mother and grandmother in the oracles of God was a constant illustration to Timothy of the blessing of doing God's will.

When Timothy was little more than a boy, Paul took him with him as his companion in labor. Those who had taught Timothy in his childhood were rewarded by seeing the son of their care linked in close fellowship with the great apostle (Manuscript 117a, 1901).

(1 Timothy 4:12.) Influence and Piety of Timothy—Paul loved Timothy because Timothy loved God. His intelligent knowledge of experimental piety and of the truth gave him distinction and influence. The piety and influence of his home life was not of a cheap order, but pure, sensible, and uncorrupted by false sentiments. The moral influence of his home was substantial, not fitful, not impulsive, not changeable. The Word of God was the rule which guided Timothy. He received his instruction line upon line, precept upon precept, here a little, and there a little. Impressions of the highest possible order were kept before his mind. His home instructors cooperated with God in educating this young man to bear the burdens that were to come upon him at an early age....

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