Ellen G. White Writings

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The Adventist Home, Page 244

Chapter 40—Misconception of the Mother's Work

Mother Tempted to Feel That Her Work Is Unimportant—The mother's work often seems to her an unimportant service. It is a work that is rarely appreciated. Others know little of her many cares and burdens. Her days are occupied with a round of little duties, all calling for patient effort, for self-control, for tact, wisdom, and self-sacrificing love; yet she cannot boast of what she has done as any great achievement. She has only kept things in the home running smoothly. Often weary and perplexed, she has tried to speak kindly to the children, to keep them busy and happy, and to guide their little feet in the right path. She feels that she has accomplished nothing. But it is not so. Heavenly angels watch the careworn mother, noting the burdens she carries day by day. Her name may not have been heard in the world, but it is written in the Lamb's book of life.1Counsels to Teachers, Parents, and Students, 144.

The true wife and mother ... will perform her duties with dignity and cheerfulness, not considering it degrading to do with her own hands whatever it is necessary to do in a well-ordered household.2The Signs of the Times, September 9, 1886.

Regarded as Inferior to Mission Service—What an important work! And yet we hear mothers sighing for missionary work! If they could only go to some foreign country, they would feel that they were doing something worth while. But to take up the daily duties of the home life and carry them forward seems to them like an exhausting and thankless task.3The Review and Herald, July 9, 1901.

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