Ellen G. White Writings

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An Appeal to the Youth, Page 69

I have just been reading in a book entitled, “How to be a Man.” I will copy a few lines, and you can apply as your case is met. “Slovenliness. A slovenly boy makes himself a deal of needless trouble, and greatly tires the patience of his mother. If you go into his room you find it always in confusion. His things are scattered about, here and there, some on the bed, some on the chairs, and some on the floor, but none in their places. He either has no particular place for anything, or else he takes no pains to put things in their places. He leaves a thing where he uses it. Hence if he wants anything he never knows where to look for it, unless he happens to remember where he used it last. He must waste his time in hunting for it. Hence you will often hear him impatiently inquiring if any one has seen his things, when he ought himself to know where they are. If he goes into another person's room, whatever article he lays his hand upon is misplaced. And so it is if he uses any of his father's tools. He never thinks of putting anything where he found it. He throws it down carelessly wherever he happens to be, or else puts it in the wrong place. With these untidy habits, is associated carelessness. He never seems to be thinking what he is

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