Ellen G. White Writings

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Evangelism, Page 507

Cautions—I was taken into some of your singing exercises, and was made to read the feelings that existed in the company, you being the prominent one. There were petty jealousies, envy, evil surmisings, and evil speaking.... The heart service is what God requires; the forms and lip service are as sounding brass and a tinkling cymbal. Your singing is for display, not to praise God with the spirit and understanding. The state of the heart reveals the quality of the religion of the professor of godliness.—Letter 1a, 1890.

Emphasis in Congregational Singing

Choir and Congregational Singing—In the meetings held, let a number be chosen to take part in the song service. And let the singing be accompanied with musical instruments skillfully handled. We are not to oppose the use of instrumental music in our work. This part of the service is to be carefully conducted; for it is the praise of God in song.

The singing is not always to be done by a few. As often as possible, let the entire congregation join.—Testimonies For The Church 9:144 (1909).

The Song Service—The singing should not be done by a few only. All present should be encouraged to join in the song service.—Letter 157, 1902.

Approach Harmony of Heavenly Choir—Music forms a part of God's worship in the courts above. We should endeavor in our songs of praise to approach as nearly as possible to the harmony of the heavenly choirs. I have often been pained to hear untrained voices, pitched to the highest key, literally shrieking the sacred words of some hymn of praise. How inappropriate those sharp, rasping voices for the solemn,

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