Ellen G. White Writings

<< Back Forward >>

«Back «Prev. Pub. «Ch «Pg   Pg» Ch» Next Pub.» Forward»

From the Heart, Page 104

Two Sons, April 2

A man had two sons, and he came to the first and said, “Son, go, work today in my vineyard.” He answered and said, “I will not,” but afterward he regretted it and went. Then he came to the second and said likewise. And he answered and said, “I go, sir,” but he did not go. Which of the two did the will of his father? Matthew 21:28-31.

In the parable the son who refused to go represented the Gentile world, and the class who said, “I go, sir” represented the Pharisees. Christ had just cleansed the temple of those who defiled it with forbidden traffic. Divinity had flashed through humanity, and the people had seen the glory and power of God manifested before them.... As He had traveled toward Jerusalem, the multitude had spread their garments in the way and had strewn His path with palm branches, and they had proclaimed His praises, singing, “Hosanna to the son of David.” Though the rejoicing ones had not dared to carry their acclamations to the very gate of the temple, fearing the priests and rulers, the children had taken up the song, and were praising God in the temple, and shouting, “Hosanna to the son of David.” ...

The Gentile world would accept the truth; but those who had so great light and such wonderful privileges, to whom had been granted both temporal and spiritual blessings, refused the message of salvation. They had professed to be the people of God. They had said, “We go, sir,” but they failed of doing their Father's will....

When the invitation of heaven has been brought to your ears, have you said, “Yes, Lord, I believe the truth,” yet by the actions of your life shown that you did not believe? Have you brought it into your heart? Has its transforming power taken hold upon your soul? Has its sanctifying grace been brought into your character? How is it with you? ...

It is the privilege of everyone to say, “I will carry out my Captain's orders to the very letter, feeling or no feeling.... I will say, ‘What are my orders? What is the line of my duty? What says the Master to me? ... What is my position before God?’” Just as soon as we come into right relations to God, we shall understand our duty and do it, and we shall not think the good things we do entitle us to salvation....

The question is not, How will you stand in the day of trouble, or at some future time, but how is it with your soul today? Will you go to work today?—The Review and Herald, April 9, 1889.

«Back «Prev. Pub. «Ch «Pg   Pg» Ch» Next Pub.» Forward»