Ellen G. White Writings

<< Back Forward >>

«Back «Prev. Pub. «Ch «Pg   Pg» Ch» Next Pub.» Forward»

From the Heart, Page 112

The Rich Man, April 10

The ground of a certain rich man yielded plentifully. And he thought within himself saying, “What shall I do, since I have no room to store my crops?” Luke 12:16, 17.

This man had received everything from God. The sun had been permitted to shine upon his land; for it falls on the just and on the unjust alike. The showers of heaven fall on the evil and the good. The Lord had caused vegetation to flourish, and the fields to yield fruit, and bring to perfection an abundant harvest. The rich man was in perplexity as to what he should do with all his produce. He regarded himself as favored above others and took credit to himself for his wisdom. He had great wealth, and could not reproach himself with the sins of which many were guilty. He had obtained his goods, not by gambling, not by taking advantage of another's misfortune who had been involved in financial embarrassment and who was obliged to sell his goods below cost; but his wealth had been obtained through the providence of God in causing his land to yield abundantly. But the man revealed his selfishness, and manifested that which he did not before suspect was in his character.

He did not think of God, the great giver of all his blessings. He did not consider his accountability to God.... Had he loved and feared God, he would have offered up thanksgiving and bowed before God, saying, “Instruct me how to use these goods.” ...

How many hungry could have been fed, how many naked clothed, how many hearts made glad, how many prayers answered for bread and clothing, and what a melody of praise could he have caused to ascend to heaven. The Lord was answering the prayers of the poor and needy and was making abundant provision for the supply of all their wants by the blessing He had bestowed upon the rich man. But the man made suddenly so rich closed the avenues of his soul to the cry of the needy; and in place of disposing of his superabundance of goods in supplying their needs, he said to his servants, “This will I do: I will pull down my barns, and build greater; and there will I bestow all my fruits and my goods.” ...

He said, “I will say to my soul, Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry.” ... God said unto him, “Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee.”—The Review and Herald, June 19, 1894.

«Back «Prev. Pub. «Ch «Pg   Pg» Ch» Next Pub.» Forward»