Ellen G. White Writings

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From the Heart, Page 15

Understanding for All, January 3

The entrance of Your words gives light; it gives understanding to the simple. Psalm 119:130.

The Word of God presents the most potent means of education, as well as the most valuable source of knowledge, within the reach of humanity. The understanding adapts itself to the dimensions of the subjects with which it is required to deal. If occupied with trivial, commonplace matters only, never summoned to earnest effort to comprehend great and eternal truths, it becomes dwarfed and enfeebled. Hence the value of the Scriptures as a means of intellectual culture. Their perusal in a reverent and teachable spirit will expand and strengthen the mind as no other study can. They lead directly to the contemplation of the most exalted, the most ennobling, and the most stupendous truths that are presented to the human mind. They direct our thoughts to the infinite Author of all things.

We see revealed the character of the Eternal and listen to His voice as He communes with patriarchs and prophets. We see explained the mysteries of His providence, the great problems which have engaged the attention of every thoughtful mind, but which, without the aid of revelation, human intellect seeks in vain to solve. They open to our understanding a simple yet sublime system of theology, presenting truths which a child may grasp but which are yet so far reaching as to baffle the powers of the strongest mind....

Our Savior did not ignore learning or despise education, yet He chose unlearned fishermen for the work of the gospel because they had not been schooled in the false customs and traditions of the world. They were men of good natural ability and of a humble, teachable spirit; men whom He could educate for His great work....

The learned lawyers, priests, and scribes scorned to be taught by Christ. They desired to teach Him, and frequently made the attempt, only to be defeated by the wisdom that laid bare their ignorance and rebuked their folly. In their pride and bigotry, they would not accept the words of Christ, yet they were surprised at the wisdom with which He spake.... But the words and deeds of the humble Teacher, recorded by the unlettered companions of His daily life, have exerted a living power upon the minds of men and women from that day to the present.—The Review and Herald, September 25, 1883.

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