Ellen G. White Writings

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From the Heart, Page 221

Death of the Firstborn, July 28

And all the firstborn in the land of Egypt shall die, from the firstborn of Pharaoh who sits on his throne, even to the firstborn of the female servant who is behind the handmill, and all the firstborn of the animals. Exodus 11:5.

As Moses had witnessed the wonderful works of God, his faith had been strengthened and his confidence established. God had been qualifying him, by manifestations of divine power, to stand at the head of the armies of Israel and, as a shepherd of His people, to lead them from Egypt. He was elevated above fear by his firm trust in God. This courage in the presence of the king annoyed his haughty pride, and he uttered the threat of killing the servant of God. In his blindness, he did not realize that he was contending not only against Moses and Aaron, but against the mighty Jehovah, the maker of the heavens and the earth. If Pharaoh had not been blinded by his rebellion, he would have known that He who could perform such mighty miracles as had been wrought would preserve the lives of His chosen servants, even though He should have to slay the king of Egypt. Moses had obtained the favor of the people. He was regarded as a wonderful personage, and the king would not dare to harm him.

Moses had still another message for the rebellious king, and before leaving his presence he fearlessly declared the word of the Lord. “About midnight will I go out into the midst of Egypt: and all the firstborn in the land of Egypt shall die, from the firstborn of Pharaoh that sitteth upon his throne, even unto the firstborn of the maidservant that is behind the mill; and all the firstborn of beasts. And there shall be a great cry throughout all the land of Egypt, such as there was none like it, nor shall be like it any more. But against any of the children of Israel shall not a dog move his tongue, against man or beast: that ye may know how that the Lord doth put a difference between the Egyptians and Israel.” ...

As Moses faithfully portrayed the nature and effects of the last dreadful plague, the king became exceedingly angry. He was enraged because he could not intimidate Moses and make him tremble before the royal authority. But the servant of God leaned for support upon a mightier arm than that of any earthly monarch.—Signs of the Times, March 18, 1880.

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