Ellen G. White Writings

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From the Heart, Page 229

Where His Voice Was Heard, August 5

He will not cry out, nor raise His voice, nor cause His voice to be heard in the street.... He will bring forth justice for truth. Isaiah 42:2, 3.

From His childhood Jesus conformed His life strictly to the Jewish laws. He manifested great wisdom in His youth. The grace and power of God were upon Him. The word of the Lord, by the mouth of the prophet Isaiah, describes the office and work of Christ and shows the sheltering care of God over His Son in His mission to earth, that the relentless hatred of men and women, inspired by Satan, should not be permitted to thwart the design of the great plan of salvation....

The voice of Christ was not heard in the street in noisy contention with those who were opposed to His doctrine. Neither was His voice heard in the street in prayer to His Father.... His voice was not heard in joyful mirth. His voice was not raised to exalt Himself and to gain the applause and flattery of sinners. When engaged in teaching, He withdrew His disciples away from the noise and confusion of the busy city to some retired place more in harmony with the lessons of humility, piety, and virtue which He would impress upon their minds. He shunned human praise and preferred solitude and peaceful retirement to the noise and confusion of mortal life. His voice was often heard in earnest, prevailing intercessions to His Father, yet for these exercises He chose the lonely mountain and frequently spent whole nights in prayer for strength to sustain Him under the temptations He should meet and to accomplish the important work He came to do for the salvation of humanity. His petitions were earnest and mingled with strong cries and tears. And notwithstanding the labor of soul during the night, He ceased not His labor through the day....

The chief priests and scribes and elders loved to pray in the most public places—not only in the crowded synagogues, but in the corners of the streets, that they might be seen by all and praised for their devotion and piety. Their acts of charity were done in the most public manner and for the purpose of calling the attention of the people to themselves. Their voices were indeed heard in the streets, not only in exalting themselves but in contention with those who differed with them in doctrine.... The Lord, through His faithful prophet, shows the life of Christ in marked contrast to the hypocritical chief priests, scribes, and Pharisees.—The Review and Herald, December 31, 1872.

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