Ellen G. White Writings

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From the Heart, Page 279

Daniel's Commitment to God, September 24

He was faithful; nor was there any error or fault found in him. Daniel 6:4.

When Darius set over the provinces of his kingdom a hundred and twenty princes, and over these, three presidents to whom the princes were to give account, we read that “Daniel was preferred above the presidents and princes, because an excellent spirit was in him; and the king thought to set him over the whole realm.” But evil angels, fearing the influence of this good man over the king and in the affairs of the kingdom, stirred up the presidents and princes to envy. These wicked men watched Daniel closely, that they might find some fault in him which they could report to the king; but they failed. “He was faithful, neither was there any error or fault found in him.”

Then Satan sought to make Daniel's faithfulness to God the cause of his destruction. The presidents and princes came tumultuously together unto the king, and said, “All the presidents of the kingdom, the governors, and the princes, the counsellors, and the captains, have consulted together to establish a royal statute, and to make a firm decree, that whosoever shall ask a petition of any God or man for thirty days, save of thee, O king, he shall be cast into the den of lions.” The king's pride was flattered. He was ignorant of the mischief purposed against Daniel, and he granted their request. The decree was signed and became one of the unalterable laws of the Medes and Persians.

These envious men did not believe that Daniel would be untrue to his God or that he would falter in his firm adherence to principle, and they were not mistaken in their estimate of his character. Daniel knew the value of communion with God. With full knowledge of the king's decree, he still bowed in prayer three times a day, “his windows being open in his chamber toward Jerusalem.” He did not seek to conceal his act, although he knew full well the consequences of his fidelity to God. He saw the dangers that beset his path, but his steps faltered not. Before those who were plotting his ruin, he would not allow even the appearance that his connection with Heaven was severed....

He knew that no man, not even his king, had a right to come between his conscience and his God and interfere with the worship due to his Maker.—Signs of the Times, November 4, 1886.

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