Ellen G. White Writings

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From the Heart, Page 89

First Things First, March 18

You are the light of the world. Matthew 5:14.

Eternal things should awaken our interest and should be regarded, in comparison with temporal things, as of infinite importance. God requires of us to make it our first business to attend to the health and prosperity of the soul. We should know that we are enjoying the favor of God, that He smiles upon us, and that we are His children indeed, and in a position where He can commune with us and we with Him. We should not be at rest until we are in that position of lowliness and meekness that He can safely bless us, and we be brought into a sacred nearness with God, where His light may shine upon us, and we reflect that light to all around us. But we cannot do this unless we are earnestly striving ourselves to live in the light. This God requires of all His followers, not merely for their own good, but also for the benefit of others around them.

We cannot let our light shine out to others so as to attract their attention to heavenly things unless we have the light in us. We must be imbued with the Spirit of Jesus Christ, or we cannot manifest to others that Christ is in us the hope of glory. We must have an indwelling Savior, or we cannot exemplify in our lives His life of devotion, His love, His gentleness, His pity, His compassion, His self-denial, and purity. This is what we earnestly desire. This should be the study of our lives, How shall I conform my character to the Bible standard of holiness? ...

Christ sacrificed His majesty, His splendor, His glory, and His honor, and for our sakes became poor, that we through His poverty might be made rich. He condescended to a life of humiliation. He was subjected to scorn. He was despised and rejected of men. He bore insult and mockery, and a most painful death in the most shameful manner, in order that He might exalt and save the fallen sons and daughters of Adam from hopeless misery. In view of this unparalleled sacrifice and mysterious love manifested for us by our Redeemer, shall we withhold from God our entire service, which at the best is so feeble? Shall we use selfishly, for business or pleasure, the time which is necessary for us to devote to religious exercises, to the study of the Scriptures, and to self-examination and prayer? ...

We have not built our hopes here, in this world. Our actions have testified to our faith, that in heaven is our enduring substance.—The Review and Herald, March 29, 1870.

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