Ellen G. White Writings

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Testimony Studies on Diet and Foods, Page 29

Your table has completed the work of making them what they are. The sin lies at your door. You know that they are not religiously inclined, that they will not submit to restraint, but are inclined to disobedience, and to disrespect your authority. Your eldest son especially is corrupt, partaking to a great degree of the animal. Scarcely a trace of the divine can be seen in his organization. You have brought up your children to indulge their appetite when they please and as they please. Your example has taught them that they live to eat; that the gratification of appetite is about all that is worth living for. There is a work for you to do, Bro. H. You have been like a man asleep or paralyzed. It is time that you make a mighty effort to save the younger members of your family. The influence of your eldest son is only evil over them. Correct your table. A depraved, stimulating diet is strengthening the animal passions of your children. Of all the families I am acquainted with, yours most needs to dispense with flesh-meats and grease, and learn to cook hygienically.

Testimonies for the Church 2:63-64

The system must be nourished. Yet we do not hesitate to say that flesh-meat is not necessary for health or strength. If used it is because a depraved appetite craves it. Its use excites the animal propensities to increased activity, and strengthens the animal passions. When the animal propensities are increased, the intellectual and moral powers are decreased. The use of flesh of animals tends to cause a grossness of body, and benumbs the fine sensibilities of the mind.... The intellectual, the moral, and the physical powers are depreciated by the habitual use of flesh-meats. Meat-eating deranges the system, beclouds the intellect, and blunts the moral sensibilities. We say to you, dear brother and sister, your safest course is to let meat alone.

Chapter 9—Diet During Pregnancy and Lactation

How to Live, 2:33

The mother, in many cases previous to the birth of her children, is permitted to toil early and late, heating her blood.... Her strength should have been tenderly cherished.... Her burdens and cares are seldom lessened, and that period, which should be to her of all others a time of rest, is one of fatigue, sadness and gloom. By too great exertion on her part, she deprives her offspring of that nutrition which nature has provided for it, and by heating her own blood, she imparts to the child a bad quality of blood. The offspring is robbed of its vitality, robbed of physical and mental strength.

Testimonies for the Church 2:378-379

I was shown the course of B in his own family. He has been severe and overbearing. He adopted the health reform as advocated by Brother C and, like him, took extreme views of the subject; and not having a well-balanced mind, he has made terrible blunders, the results of which time will not efface. Aided by items gathered from books, he commenced to carry out the theory he had heard advocated by Brother C and, like him, made a point of bringing all up to the standard he had erected. He brought his own family to his rigid rules, but failed to control his own animal propensities. He failed to bring himself to the mark, and to keep his body under. If he had had a correct knowledge of the system of health reform, he would have known that his wife was not in a condition to give birth to healthy children. His own unsubdued passions had borne sway without reasoning from cause to effect.

Before the birth of his children, he did not treat his wife as a woman in her condition should be treated. He carried out his rigid rules for her, according to Brother C's ideas, which proved a great injury to her. He did not provide the quality and quantity of food that was necessary to nourish two lives instead of one. Another life was dependent upon her, and her system did not receive the nutritious, wholesome food necessary to sustain her strength. There was a lack in the quantity and in the quality. Her system required changes, a variety and quality of food that was more nourishing. Her children were born with feeble digestive powers and impoverished blood. From the food the mother was compelled to receive, she could not furnish a good quality of blood, and therefore gave birth to children filled with humors.

Testimonies for the Church 2:381-384

It is an error generally committed to make no difference in the life of a woman previous to the birth of her children. At this important period the labor of the mother should be lightened. Great changes are going on in her system. It requires a greater amount of blood, and therefore an increase

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