Ellen G. White Writings

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Temperance, Page 170

Section 9—Laying the Foundation of Intemperance

Chapter 1—Prenatal Influence

Where Reform Should Begin—The efforts of our temperance workers are not sufficiently far-reaching to banish the curse of intemperance from our land. Habits once formed are hard to overcome. The reform should begin with the mother before the birth of her children; and if God's instructions were faithfully obeyed, intemperance would not exist.

It should be the constant effort of every mother to conform her habits to God's will, that she may work in harmony with Him to preserve her children from the health- and life-destroying vices of the present day. Let mothers place themselves without delay in right relations to their Creator, that they may by His assisting grace build around their children a bulwark against dissipation and intemperance.—Counsels on Diet and Foods, 225, 226.

The Habits of the Father and the Mother—As a rule, every intemperate man who rears children, transmits his inclinations and evil tendencies to his offspring.—The Review and Herald, November 21, 1882.

The child will be affected for good or evil by the habits of the mother. She must herself be controlled by principle, and must practice temperance and self-denial, if she would seek the welfare of her child.—Counsels on Diet and Foods, 218.

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