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Manuscript Releases, vol. 5 [Nos. 260-346]

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    MR No. 317—Ecstatic Experiences in the Early Days

    Our conference at Topsham was one of deep interest. Twenty-eight were present; all took part in the meeting.5MR 226.1

    Sunday the power of God came upon us like a mighty rushing wind. All arose upon their feet and praised God with a loud voice; it was something as it was when the foundation of the house of God was laid. The voice of weeping could not be told from the voice of shouting. It was a triumphant time; all were strengthened and refreshed. I never witnessed such a powerful time before.—Letter 28, 1850, p. 1. (To the church in Brother Hasting's home, November 7, 1850.)5MR 226.2

    Our last conference was one of deep interest. Two were dug from beneath the rubbish. The present truth was presented in its clear light and it found way to the hearts of the erring. Before the meeting closed all were upon their knees, some were crying for mercy that had been cold-hearted and indifferent, others were begging for a closer walk with God and for salvation. It was as powerful a time as I ever witnessed; the slaying power of God was in our midst. Shouts of victory filled the dwelling. The saints here seem to be rising and growing in grace and the knowledge of the truth.—Letter 30, 1850, p. 1. (To Brother and Sister Loveland, December 13, 1850.)5MR 226.3

    Our meeting yesterday was interesting especially in the evening the Spirit of God settled upon us like the dew upon the mown grass, and our hearts were made joyful in God. We feel the need of being fully prepared and fitted to stand in the battle in the day of the Lord.—Letter 1, 1851, p. 1. (To Brother and Sister Preston, October 19, 1851.)5MR 226.4

    We were united in praying last evening for the Spirit of the Lord to fall upon us. God heard our earnest cries. I was taken off in vision. I saw how great and holy God was. Said the angel, “Walk carefully before Him, for He is high and lifted up and the train of His glory fills the temple.” I saw that everything in heaven was in perfect order. Said the angel, “Look ye; Christ is the head; move in order, move in order. Have a meaning to everything.”5MR 227.1

    Said the angel, “Behold ye, and know how perfect, how beautiful the order in heaven; follow it”....5MR 227.2

    I saw that the exercises were in great danger of being adulterated, and their former opinion and knowledge governing in a measure their exercise, therefore implicit confidence could not be placed in these exercises. But if anyone was lost to everything around him, and should be in the state that Paul was in, whether in the body or out of the body, he could not tell, and God communicate to him through His angels, there would be then no danger of a mistake.5MR 227.3

    I saw that we should strive at all times to be free from unhealthy and unnecessary excitement. I saw that there was great danger of leaving the Word of God and resting down and trusting in exercises. I saw that God had moved by His Spirit upon your company in some of their exercises and their promptings; but I saw danger ahead....5MR 227.4

    I saw that the burden of the message now was the truth. The Word of God should be strictly followed and held up to the people of God. And it would be beautiful and lovely if God's people should be brought into a strait [place], to see the workings of God through exercises of visions.5MR 228.1

    But I saw in our conference meeting some laid out the work that God was to give exercises, and rebels were to be purged out in the meeting. Then the honest, conscientious ones began to tremble. I am afraid [that] I shall be purged out, and they take their minds from Jesus, and fix them upon themselves and others, and the meeting leaves them lower than it found them. I saw that we must try to lift our minds above self and have them dwell upon God, the high and lofty One....5MR 228.2

    I saw the burden of the message should be the first, second, and third angels’ messages, and those who had any hope in God would yield to the force of that truth. How mighty and glorious it looked to me. Oh, what privilege is ours, that of being among the children of God and believing the mighty truth—a poor, despised company, but how honored of God!5MR 228.3

    I saw if Israel moved steadily along, going according to Bible order, they would be as terrible as an army with banners.—Manuscript 11, 1850, 1-3. (Vision at Paris, Maine, December 25, 1850.)5MR 228.4

    I saw that the spirit that both Bennet and Libby possessed while Brother and Sister Phillips were in union with them, was an unclean spirit and an unholy spirit, and Brother and Sister O have not as yet realized and admitted and shaken it off. The spirit moved strongly on the feelings, and these feelings, many of them, are yet cherished as sacred, [indited by] the Holy Ghost.5MR 228.5

    But many times when it was upon Brother and Sister Phillips, they knew not what spirit they were of. At the time these men were professing so much of the Holy Ghost, especially Bennet, his life was corrupt, his heart vile. I was shown that a great many have been entirely thrown off their balance by not understanding the spirit that some of these [seemingly] very good and professedly holy men possessed. That they have felt the influence of and received great blessings through the influence of their prayers and apparent faith.5MR 229.1

    It has stumbled many an honest soul, and here they have grounded and made shipwreck of faith. They trusted to feeling, to an influence or power that was brought to bear upon their feelings. I saw that many, very many had been truly converted through the influence of persons who were living in open violation of the commandments of God, their lives vile and corrupt....5MR 229.2

    I saw the great danger of those who have been connected with this spirit setting down this or that as the power of God, and “knowing” this to be His power, and if they yield this or that they give up their whole Christian experience....5MR 229.3

    You all go too much by feeling. I saw Brother Pierce would often try to talk the truth; if he did not have that liberty and success, that freedom he anticipated, he settled down, [thinking] that God did not call him to that work. Now if it had not been for this, Brother Pierce might have been more useful than he has been.5MR 229.4

    All, every one of God's called and chosen servants, have had just such times, and if they had followed their feelings, would have given up, [feeling] that that was not the work God had given them to do. But the servants of God will always have obstacles to surmount. But do not yield up readily; keep trying, and plow your way through the darkness. Look away to Jesus, depend upon Him entirely.5MR 230.1

    You follow feelings too much, and if you feel clouds come over you, you let it influence you too much. Feeling is as unsafe a guide as you can follow. You make altogether too much of a happy flight of feeling or a shouting time. These times will come, but they are not always an undoubted evidence that we are right. You have made too much of these seasons, and in some of them there has been a fanatical spirit not in accordance with the spirit of truth. I saw that there was a more useful place for your gifts to be occupied where they can move and stir souls.—Letter 2, 1851, pp. 1-5. (To Brother Pierce, undated.)5MR 230.2

    I saw how this spirit [of spiritual magnetism] or power will leave the individual, after the power has passed off. Instead of their having more strength from God than they had before they felt this power, and more grace to overcome every wrong word or action, instead of being spiritually minded and having their minds fixed upon heaven and heavenly things, it was the reverse of this.5MR 230.3

    Those who have been exercised by this false spirit have a depressed, sunken, empty, void, unsatisfied, stupid feeling. They will feel a lack of the grace of God, be in danger of speaking impatiently and from the impulse of the moment, feel that they have lost all their religion, though they hardly know how.—Manuscript 3, 1854. (Testimony to churches in New York State, February 12, 1854.)5MR 230.4

    I followed in exhortation. I had great freedom in talking upon faith, that faith and feeling should not be confounded together. They are distinct as the east is from the west. In the darkest hours it is then we should exercise faith, and not suffer our feelings to govern us, but press our faith through the dark clouds to the throne of God and claim the blessing of Heaven. When our faith grasps the blessing, then the blessing is ours, for our faith has got hold of it, and when our faith brings the blessing down to us—when the dark clouds scatter and divine rays of light from Jesus illumine our darkness—then it is no more faith, it is feeling. The evidence has come, and it is feeling that has swallowed up the faith. This view of faith and feeling seemed to enlighten some minds and we had a most powerful conference meeting.—Letter 4, 1854. (To “Dear Friends,” October 12, 1854.)5MR 231.1

    When you have received the baptism of the Holy Spirit, then you will understand more of the joys of salvation than you have known all your life hitherto. “Ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you; and ye shall be witnesses to Me ... unto the uttermost parts of the earth.”—Letter 33, 1890, pp. 9, 10. (To “Dear Brethren and Sisters in Norwich, Massachusetts,” December 4, 1890.)5MR 231.2

    I rejoiced when I heard that the Holy Ghost had been poured out upon our people in America, and I have been anxiously waiting new developments in America as was seen after the Holy Spirit descended on the day of Pentecost. I thought similar fruits would be seen, that the missionary spirit of God would burn in the hearts of all upon whom the Spirit of God was manifestly moving.—Letter 9a, 1893, p. 8. (To “Dear Brethren in America,” August 1, 1893.)5MR 232.1

    Our camp meeting from its commencement to the present time has been most solemn and the Spirit of the Lord in a most signal manner has been manifested in the social and preaching meetings. The great sin of Jerusalem was the rejection of her present blessings and present warnings. I spoke from these words, “And when He was come near, He beheld the city, and wept over it, saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace! but now they are hid from thine eyes.” [Luke 19:41, 42.]5MR 232.2

    I made a practical application of these words to the people of God. The solemn power of God was upon me and upon the hearers. The tearful eye and earnest looks revealed the true state of feelings.—Letter 16, 1875, p. 7. (To Elder G. I. Butler, June 6, 1875.)5MR 232.3

    Our meetings have been excellent from the commencement. Monday at seven o'clock I spoke to the Scandinavians, Brother Matteson interpreting. I had great freedom, and the Spirit of the Lord rested upon those who heard, if we could judge by the solemnity expressed in the countenance and the tearful eyes....5MR 232.4

    Tuesday morning, the closing meeting was held. I felt much of the Spirit of God as I addressed the congregation about one half an hour. The melting Spirit of God was in the meeting, and harmony and peace of Christ prevailed [in] the meeting.—Letter 20, 1875, pp. 2, 3. (To W. C. White and Mary, June 27, 1875.)5MR 233.1

    Friday was a precious day. The rubbish has been removed from the door of the heart, and they have opened it to Jesus. Everything has been without excitement or extravagance. The leaven of Christ's righteousness has been introduced into the experience and has energized the soul. Oh, that it may continue to work in its mysterious power until its diffusive influence quickens the lukewarm souls with whom it is brought in contact.5MR 233.2

    Softly and silently the power of the divine Spirit does its work, wakening the dulled senses, quickening the soul, and arousing its sensibilities, until each member of the church shall indeed be the light of the world.—Letter 85, 1889, p. 8. (To “My Dear Brethren,” circa April 1889.)5MR 233.3

    I miss you here so much, but the Lord has not left me alone. Today has been a precious day to us in Oregon. The Spirit of the Lord was manifested in a most marked manner in the nine-o'clock social meeting. Many humble, good testimonies were borne and the melting Spirit of God rested upon preachers and people....5MR 233.4

    The Spirit of the Lord rested upon the congregation. His sweet, melting power was in our midst. How thankful we should be for these heavenly tokens!—Letter 37, 1878. (To “Dear Husband,” June 28, 1878.)5MR 234.1

    I went out to the stand with trembling, my head throbbing with pain. I spoke from the fifty-eighth chapter of Isaiah. The Lord spoke through me. The words came in demonstration of the Spirit and power, almost faster than I could articulate them. The congregation were nearly all in tears. I called them forward, and about fifty came forward, and they bore testimony. All were weeping like children. All felt the power and presence of God. There was indeed the revealing of His power. Hearts were subdued and broken before God.—Letter 29, 1880, p. 3. (To James White, May 20, 1880.)5MR 234.2

    One place we were laboring in America, and there was every youth in our college ... converted as we were telling them the simple story of the cross, to come to Jesus just as they were. Such an experience....5MR 234.3

    The glory of God came into that meeting. It seemed at times at the commencement of the meeting that the glory of God was about to drop upon us, but it did not come only to a few, but at this time like a tidal wave it swept through that congregation, and what a time of rejoicing.5MR 234.4

    There were no wild demonstrations, for the praise of God does not lead to that. We never hear of any such things as that in the life of Christ, as jumping up and down and around, and screaming and hollering. No; God's work appeals to the senses and reason of men and women.5MR 234.5

    There are no such outward demonstrations. But the Spirit of God has an influence upon the human heart that shows itself in the countenance, and the shining of the very face reveals Jesus within. Now it was a miracle of God's mercy that took every student in that school and transformed them in character, and sent them out as missionaries. Two of the teachers are now in Tahiti as missionaries that were in that meeting. The light of the glory of God was there.—Manuscript 49, 1894, 10, 11. (Sermon at Ashfield, Australia, Camp meeting, November 3, 1894.)5MR 235.1

    Every influence will be set in operation by satanic agencies, to divert minds from the genuine work that will place men as laborers together with God. All who do not aggressively labor in the warfare where Christ, the mighty General of armies, leads, will be in the opposite party, composing the armies of the prince of darkness. They will lead the people away from the living issues that should occupy their minds and hearts and prepare them to distinguish between the voice of the world and the voice of Jesus Christ. We must ourselves be very watchful and prayerful, that we may be able to understand [distinguish] the voice of the deceiver from the voice of Him who always speaks the truth. Those who are worked by the Holy Spirit are not led by a feeling of enthusiasm, which soon goes out in darkness. The spell of Christ's influence is abiding. “Be still and know that I am God.” This is a solemn abiding quietude in God.5MR 235.2

    There is danger that all of us will have too much zeal, and too little of Christ's sound wisdom and unquestionable prudence. Every one must stand individually as an active, working agency for the Master, beholding His work as it is given in His word for our practice. Individually, they must think for themselves. With an open Bible before them, they must study under the influence and presence of Jesus Christ, inquiring and knowing for their individual selves what is the way of the Lord.—Letter 77, 1900, p. 2. (To Dr. J. H. Kellogg.)5MR 235.3

    The great work for the salvation of your own souls and the souls of your fellowmen is not the best done in a state of excitement, when the feelings are stirred. The preparation essential to do the work of God acceptably and successfully must be obtained in searching the Scriptures and in humble, earnest prayer, in quietness, in peace. There is a work to be done, not merely when the soul is stirred with fervor and emotion, and feeling takes the place of thought, and the helm of control is lost in excitement and busy conflict. God's Spirit moves upon the mind and controls the emotions of the soul.5MR 236.1

    The rational thought and the right feelings and the faultless life come from the same source and are quiet and strong and sensible in their operation. To possess and enjoy the Spirit of God, there must be a conformity to the life, the actions to the will, of God; the heart must be prepared; the soul temple cleansed from defilement of self and sin. Then the power of grace comes in, and God works with His ministers.—Letter 24, 1880, p. 3. (To “Dear Husband,” April 17, 1880.)5MR 236.2

    Wednesday morning. Attended the early morning [meeting]. The room was full. I was pleased to see so great interest manifested. I spoke in regard to the necessity of our ministers’ being fitted up day by day with the baptism of the Holy Ghost, before going forth to their labors. Christ has promised it, why should they not have it? Lay hold by faith.5MR 236.3

    Many precious testimonies were borne, but yet there is not that fullness of faith that reaches out for a fullness of the blessing of God, as it is our privilege and duty to have. I fear many will go away from this meeting greatly in need of the very blessings that it is their privilege to receive, just now.—Manuscript 22, 1889, 15. (Diary, October 16-31, 1889.)5MR 237.1

    How easy, then, for the breach to be healed. It should have been Brother Cornell's study, How can I help the cause of God and prevent an open rupture here? One Holy Ghost meeting would have healed the wound; but instead of healing the difficulty, Brother Cornell made a wide breach.—Letter 6, 1856, p. 3. (To Brethren Cornell, Palmer, and Dr. Kellogg, circa 1856.)5MR 237.2

    To the church in your place. What God showed me while I was with you. I saw that you had been sinking, growing dormant and unbelieving. I also saw that you have not glorified God as you should have done, by offering praise. I saw that the powers of darkness had been getting the victory over you....5MR 237.3

    I saw that Satan had worked through her effectually to bind God's children. When one had attempted to make an effort to rise and get the victory, the rest were like loadstones to drag him down. I saw you should rise together, and unitedly get the victory over the powers of darkness and sing and shout to the glory of God.5MR 237.4

    I saw that we are the only people upon the earth from whom God is to get glory, and if we should hold our peace the very stones would cry out, for God must receive glory from some of those who dwell upon the earth. The only company who can praise and honor God, I saw, are those who are keeping the commandments of God and have the faith of Jesus....5MR 238.1

    Singing, I saw, often drove away the enemy and shouting would beat him back. I saw that pride had crept in among you, and there was not childlike simplicity among you. The fear of man, I saw, must all go.—Manuscript 5a, 1850, pp. 1, 2. (“To the Church in Your Place,” July, 1850.)5MR 238.2

    I saw we must be daily rising and [must] keep the ascendancy above the powers of darkness. Our God is mighty. I saw singing to the glory of God often drove the enemy, and praising God would beat him back and give us the victory. I saw that there was too little glorifying God, too little childlike simplicity among the remnant.—Manuscript 5, 1850, 1, 2. (“A Vision the Lord Gave Me at Oswego,” July 29, 1850.)5MR 238.3

    James was taken with the cholera morbus. He failed very fast until yesterday, p.m. Then he made a request for us to pray for him. Brother Harris was gone to his work, so that it only left Sister Harris, Clarissa, and Sarah and myself. We all felt unworthy to engage in the work.... Our united prayers went up to God and the answer came.5MR 238.4

    Sister Harris and Clarissa were set entirely free, and they prayed God with a loud voice. The Spirit caused Clarissa to laugh aloud. James was healed every whit; the great distress he had had in his head was every whit removed, and he looked as though he had got the holy anointing. The fever and all pain left him, and he ate and was strengthened. He walked out upon his faith, harnessed his horse, and he and I went to Port Byron, one mile and a half and back. He gained strength very fast. He is quite strong today. Praise the good Lord.—Letter 12, 1850, p. 2. (To Brother and Sister Howland, August 15, 1850.)5MR 239.1

    Here we are at Brother [E. P.] Butler's. Oh, how changed everything is here! God had wrought for us mightily; praise His holy name. At Washington the Lord took the rule of the meeting Himself....5MR 239.2

    You remember I was not very well when we parted. I continued to grow feeble, and all day Sabbath was very weak, not able to sit up; in the eve I fainted quite away. The brethren prayed over me and I was healed and taken off in vision. I had a deep plunge in the glory, and the state of things in Washington was revealed to me, which I declared plainly to them....5MR 239.3

    Monday forenoon we held another meeting and it was the best meeting of the whole; sweet union and love prevailed in the meeting....5MR 239.4

    Just as the meeting closed, Sister Meade, who had been afflicted with a slow fever, requested us to pray for her. We went into a room by ourselves, Brethren Holt, Wheeler, Stowell, James, and self. After I had anointed her with oil we prayed over her, and she was healed every whit and fell prostrate by the power of God. That night we got into a rowboat and went on the pond about one mile to Brother Meade's. His sister was there with a very sick child. We anointed it with oil and prayed over it, and God heard our prayers....5MR 239.5

    Tuesday, [November 4] the same eve, the conference commenced....5MR 240.1

    In the morn we all seemed to have an agonizing cry for God to work like Himself, a wonder-working God. Our prayers were answered. The power of God came down; it was a good season; angels were hovering over us. I was taken off in vision....5MR 240.2

    Six wagonloads of us left Johnson and came to Sister Benson's, twenty miles, took some refreshment, and then went on to Brother Butler's. Brethren Baker and Hart were with us. Brother Baker had not slept any for two or three nights, troubled with disease of the heart. He said he must go home and be sick some days, but we got a spirit of prayer for him and the Lord heard us pray.5MR 240.3

    Brother Baker was healed, and he glorified God with a loud voice; he had a baptism of the Holy Ghost. We parted with him and Brother Hart rejoicing, triumphant in God.—Letter 8, 1851, pp. 1, 2, 6. (To Brother and Sister Howland, November 12, 1851.)5MR 240.4

    We received your very kind letter in due time, and designed answering it before, but have been quite sick.... Last Thursday eve, the family bore my case to the great Physician, and I tried to have faith for myself and was immediately healed. The glory of the Lord shone about us, and we all rejoiced and triumphed in God for His unbounded goodness to us. All in the room were blest and shouted the praise of God.—Letter 9, 1853, p. 1. (To Sister Kellogg, December 5, 1853.)5MR 240.5

    We are now on the [South] Lancaster campground. We rode out with Brother Haskell for to plead for a blessing for your father. We have just bowed in the grove and had a most precious season of prayer. Father was blessed....5MR 241.1

    In the evening all assembled in the parlor at Brother Haskell's while father made some remarks.... We then, according to his request, anointed him with oil in the name of the Lord, following the directions in James five. We then united in prayer. We had the assurance that God's ear was open to our prayer. What a scene of breaking of heart, of tears, and confessions and humiliation before God. The dear Saviour came sacredly near to us. We claimed the promises of God. Precious light, grace, and peace flowed in upon us. We wept and shouted for joy.5MR 241.2

    Father's face was lighted up with the glory of God. Sister Ings felt His power as never before. We all shouted the praise of God. It was weeping for joy and blessing of God with gladness of heart. Everyone in the room was blessed.5MR 241.3

    We know that the Great Healer has come near, not only to your father but your mother. We have claimed the promise of God, and this is the victory, even your faith. We were all a happy company. The confusion of brain left your father. He has had a slow fever since his illness. His stomach was relieved. God has wrought. Praise His holy name. Your father will not die but live to praise and glorify God.5MR 241.4

    We returned to rest, but we could not sleep. We were too happy for sleep. We praised our Saviour nearly all night. There was not much sleeping done in the house that night. God had come with His holy presence into the house, and His sanctifying presence was too highly prized to sleep over the hours to us so precious. We have been very happy ever since. Peace and joy have flowed in upon our souls like a river. There has been uninterrupted peace and rest in the dear Saviour. Such an assurance as we are having is worth more than riches or gold, honor or worldly glory. I prize it! I prize it! The praise of God has been in our hearts, and upon our lips continually since that good evening. My peace is like a river and the righteousness thereof like the waves of the sea.—Letter 11, 1877, pp. 1, 2. (To “Dear Children,” August 31, 1877.)5MR 242.1

    The Lord is willing to bless us. We may have a fullness in Jesus. We are individually to be tested and tried. We must all pass through the refining process, until all the impurities in our characters are burned away. Every individual member of the church will be subjected to the furnace fire. The Refiner means not to extinguish them, but to purify them from all dross.5MR 242.2

    The Lord has wrought in your midst, and Satan, who is ever active watching for a favorable opportunity, has intruded himself to mingle fanaticism with God's work, to sow tares with the good seed. We need to live very close to Jesus in order to discern the precious from the spurious.—Letter 21, 1886, p. 5. (To “Dear Brethren and Sisters in Healdsburg,” July 9, 1886.)5MR 242.3

    He [Elder E. P. Daniels] is hasty; he feels strongly and acts impulsively.... He is not a perfect man, but I know how God regards him—as a man of erring, impulsive disposition, but one who loves and fears Him, and one who will reach hearts if he has those in whom he can have confidence as counselors to help him.—Letter 10, 1885, pp. 1, 2. (To J. H. Waggoner, November 4, 1885.)5MR 243.1

    I wish to say some things in reference to the revival at Healdsburg.5MR 243.2

    I wish to say I am not in harmony with your treatment of this matter. That there were fanatical ones who pressed into that work I would not deny. But if you move in the future as you have done in this matter, you may be assured of one thing, you will condemn the work of the latter rain when it shall come. For you will see at that time far greater evidences of fanaticism.5MR 243.3

    I believe the work at Healdsburg to be genuine. I believe there were the deep movings of the Spirit of God. I believe unconsecrated, unconverted ones urged themselves to the front. The enemy always works through those of unbalanced minds and imperfect characters. I do not believe that Elder [E. P.] Daniels moved wisely in all things, and it would be a new chapter in the experience of workers if there were not a mistake made in some things....5MR 243.4

    When an effort shall be made in the work of God, Satan will be on the ground to urge himself to notice, but shall it be the work of ministers to stretch out the hand and say, This must go no farther, for it is not the work of God? I believe that God was giving the people in Healdsburg a warning....5MR 243.5

    I wish you could see what a delicate, dangerous matter it is to meddle with the work of God unless you have light from heaven to guide you in your decisions.... I fear you have grieved the Spirit of God. The fruits were good in the work at Healdsburg, but the spurious was brought in as well as the genuine. Then it needed men of discernment, of calm, well-balanced minds, to come in when there was peril and indiscretion, to have a molding influence upon the work. You could have done this. You had no moral right to stop the meetings and to stop Elder Daniels from going right forward with the work and making the very most of the interest started, to gather outsiders into the interest if possible....5MR 244.1

    In regard to Elder [E. P.] Daniels, he is finite; he is not infallible. But there is such a disposition to judge others. They do not keep in view that God works by whom He will. Christ is to be seen as officiating through the delegated servant. The great evil is that the mind becomes narrowed and loses sight of the chief Worker; it gets on the instrument and decides the people cannot be advantaged unless the manners and the habits of the worker meet their own pattern exactly. They regard the speaker as a man, merely, not a messenger whom God may use to deliver a message or do a certain work. God has chosen man to do a certain work. His mental capacities may be weak, but then the evidence is more apparent that God works. His speech may not be eloquent, but that is no evidence that he has not a message from God. His knowledge may be limited, but in many cases God can work with His wisdom through such an agent, and the power be seen of God, more than through one possessing natural and acquired abilities and who knows it and has confidence in himself, in his judgment, in his knowledge, in his manner of address.5MR 244.2

    But Elder [E. P.] Daniels is an acceptable speaker and, as I have been shown, a man of not the deepest judgment, one who needed a counselor; but he is a man who could come close to the hearts of the people and one who possesses sympathy in personal efforts that would penetrate the barriers built up about the soul that resisted the influence of the truth. God works in and through frail instruments, and He is not discerned.—Letter 76, 1886, pp. 1-4. (To J. H. Waggoner, J. N. Loughborough, A. T. Jones, and E. J. Waggoner, Undated.)5MR 245.1

    Just such a work as I hope has been done in Healdsburg, will be done in every church in our land, and through ways and means that we do not look for. Let this work go forward everywhere. Let sins be confessed. Let iniquities be revealed. Let it extend far and near. This work will be done. Men may pronounce against it because it does not come in their exact line. Fanaticism will also come in as it always has done when God works. The net will gather in its meshes both bad and good, but who will dare to cast the whole thing overboard, because all are not of the right kind of fish? I feel deeply over this matter. I do not doubt but that Elder Daniels has erred in some things, but has his error been of that character that it makes him unworthy of a place among God's people?—Letter 10, 1885, p. 3. (To J. H. Waggoner, November 4, 1885.)5MR 245.2

    In regard to the revival meetings at Healdsburg, it surely bears fruit of being the work of God, but in every such revival Satan gains advantages by coming in through unconsecrated persons who have had little or no experience in a life of piety and godliness. These elements will press to the front and on such occasions will be the most forward, the most zealous and enthusiastic.5MR 245.3

    The very ones who could not be trusted with any important religious interest would take any burden, shoulder any responsibility, as though they were men and women who had earned a reputation through a life of self-denial, of self-sacrifice and devotion, that they were capable of deciding important questions and leading the church.5MR 246.1

    To put confidence in these would be like committing big vessels into the hands of children to manage on the high seas. Such persons need the transforming grace of Christ daily in order to bear fruit to the glory of God. “Learn of Me,” says Christ, “for I am meek and lowly in heart.” Such persons have never learned this lesson. If they would wear Christ's yoke and lift Christ's burdens then they would understand better how they might help and bless others.5MR 246.2

    Now I suppose these individuals were the very ones who were the most officious in the meetings in Healdsburg. From what I have been shown I would suppose that they were of that number that composed the private meetings, where only those “who were wholly the Lord's” met. I know what I am talking about, for these matters have been laid open before me several times; and yet I would say to my brethren and sisters in Healdsburg, I believe the Spirit of God has done a work for you.5MR 246.3

    Hold fast everything that is good. Have no spirit of Phariseeism; have no loftiness and self-confidence. The lower you lie at the foot of the cross, the more distinct and the more precious will be your views of Christ our Redeemer. The one grace that is so much wanted with everyone who professes to be a follower of Christ is meekness, humility, humbleness of mind. One view of Jesus sends self-importance to the winds....5MR 246.4

    I have a deep interest for the church in Healdsburg. Their prosperity depends upon the right hold that they have on Jesus. The presence of personal home piety will tell upon their own character, upon the character of their children, and upon their behavior toward the animals which they use.—Letter 9, 1886, pp. 2, 3. (To Brother and Sister Harmon, February 8, 1886.)5MR 247.1

    Many prayers have been offered for the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, and recently there have been demonstrations of gladness of heart in those who have looked intently and undividedly to Jesus Christ, the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world. There has been in your midst repentance and confession of sin, with true remorse of soul. There was a sense of the all-sufficient sacrifice, and the realizing of the fulfillment of the promise in the pardon, in transferring the live coal from the altar of atonement and touching the lips, which was the pledge of forgiveness. Lips defiled with sin were expressing the loftiest praise. Hosanna! Blessed be He that cometh in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest! ...5MR 247.2

    But what returns have our young people made to the Lord? Has it been as it was with the people of Israel on the most solemn occasion described in Exodus? Moses had gone up into the mount to receive instruction from the Lord, and the whole congregation should have been in humble attitude before God; but instead of that they ate and drank and rose up to play. Has there been a similar experience in Battle Creek? Have not many lost their hold on God? Did the exercise in games of football bring the participants into more close relation to God?5MR 247.3

    In the night season messages have been given to me to give to you in Battle Creek, and to all our schools. While it is in the order of God that the physical powers shall be trained as well as the mental, yet the physical exercise should in character be in complete harmony with the lessons given by Jesus Christ to His disciples. That which is given to the world should be seen in the lives of Christians; so that in education and in self-training the heavenly intelligences should not record in the books that the students and the teachers in our schools are “lovers of pleasure more than lovers of God.”—Manuscript 51, 1893, 1, 2. (To teachers and students of Battle Creek College and all educational institutions, December, 1893.)5MR 248.1

    Last Wednesday about six o'clock p.m., a brother came from Portland, eleven miles from here, and wanted we should go and pray for his wife, for she was just alive, and that was all. She was taken so violent that they called in a physician. He tried to help her, but could do her no good, and said she must die. Another physician was consulted, who said he could do nothing. The last was the most celebrated physician in Middletown, Connecticut.5MR 248.2

    Sister Penfield told her husband to go for God's people, she sent for us. It was rather of a trial for me to start, it was rainy and I had been very weak all day, but I concluded to go. James felt he must go too. Brother and Sister Ralph also went according to her request. We prayed for her at ten o'clock that night and the Spirit began to settle. She had been in very great agony, but we anointed her with oil in the name of the Lord, and then our earnest cries went up to God for healing power.5MR 248.3

    God began to work, the pain ceased, but we did not get the full victory we wanted that night. She rested well that night, was free from pain. In the morn we united in prayer for her again. The power came down like a mighty, rushing wind, the room was filled with the glory of God, and I was swallowed up in the glory and was taken off in vision. I saw the willingness of God to heal the afflicted and distressed....5MR 249.1

    The work of healing was done up well. She grew stronger in body and mind.... Sister Penfield is strong. Praise the Lord.—Letter 1, 1848, pp. 4, 5. (To Brother and Sister Hastings, May 29, 1848.)5MR 249.2

    Released January 18, 1973.

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