Ellen G. White Writings

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1. From Trials to Triumph, p. 205.5 (Ellen G. White) (100%)
“I have not shunned to declare unto you all the counsel of God.” No fear of giving offense could lead Paul to withhold the words that God had given him for their warning or correction. If the minister of Christ today sees that any of his flock are cherishing sin, he must as a faithful shepherd give them from God's word the instruction applicable to their case. The pastor must give his people faithful instruction, showing them what they must be and do in order to stand perfect in the day of God. A faithful teacher of the truth will at the close of his work be able to say with Paul, “I am pure from the blood of all men.”

2. Testimony for the Battle Creek Church, p. 82.1 (Ellen G. White) (100%)
There is a large church in Battle Creek, and not a man to act as pastor. There are elders; but these men lack the essential qualities to stand at their post of duty and hold the fort. Unless there is a different influence from what these men have exerted in the church, it will never be in a prosperous condition. These men lead the church into the world rather than from it. Men are needed who will be steadfast to principle, who will not only lift, but carry the burden, through Christ strengthening them,—men whom ambition will not mislead, or peril intimidate.

3. Lt 13, 1869 (September 24, 1869) par. 5 (92%)
When I called two meetings to speak in my own defense, you were glad to hear me speak plainly in reproof to Martha [Amadon]. You exulted over her discomfiture, yet felt not over your own sins. In these meetings, when I had the privilege of speaking for myself, you were all convicted of your very wrong course. God has marked your wicked feelings in your apparent indifference, when my poor husband, who had been your faithful, self-sacrificing pastor so many years, came to you. His heart was all love for you, glad that God was restoring him, and in his simplicity expecting you to be glad also. Oh, what a bitter disappointment. Like Jesuits you came in, took your seats in the back part of the house and showed contempt in your looks and deportment. He was writhing under the wound; his bruised spirit was in anguish, yet he spoke humbly and in the fear of God. I saw in vision that manifestation on your part was against Jesus; your contempt was marked against Christ. It has not been blotted out.

4. Lt 29, 1872 (October 1872) par. 18 (92%)
Ministers of Christ should feel it a duty binding upon them, if they receive the hospitalities of their brethren or friends, to leave a blessing with the family by seeking to encourage and strengthen the members of the family. They should not neglect the duties of a pastor as they visit from house to house. They should become familiar with every member of the family, that they may understand the spiritual condition of all, and vary their manner of labor to meet the case of each member of the family. When ministers bearing the solemn message of warning to the world receive the courtesy of friends and brethren, and neglect the duties of a shepherd of the flock, but are careless in their example and deportment, and engage with the young in trifling conversation, jesting, joking, and relating humorous anecdotes to create a laugh, they are unworthy of being a gospel minister, and need to be converted before they should be entrusted with the care of the sheep and lambs. Ministers who are neglectful of the duties devolving on a faithful pastor give evidence that they are not sanctified by the truths they present to others, and should not be sustained as laborers in the vineyard of the Lord until they have a high sense of the sacredness of the work of a minister of Jesus Christ.

5. Lt 8, 1873 (March 29, 1873) par. 5 (92%)
A German Baptist minister came to the Health Institute with dropsy and heart disease. He thought his case was hopeless. He was terribly bloated, but the treatment given him was successful and the dropsy has disappeared. He became interested in the truth and has decided to obey the truth. He is a man of learning and a very devoted Christian. He has an experience that but few have in the knowledge of the way of salvation. His face is all lighted up with intelligence and cheerful hope. He is pastor of a church of Germans about eight miles from here. He understands different languages. He says he wishes to move with great caution for his church love him, and he thinks all will go with him in taking their position on the truth. He wishes to open these wonderful things, of such importance to them, as they can bear it. He bears a testimony in meetings that has influence, for every word seems to be dictated by the Spirit of God. Brother Allwood had waited with great desire for our return. He has listened to our discourses with deepest interest. He expresses his pleasure and gratification to find that we have so much to say in regard to experimental religion. If God will bless this dear brother with health, he will be of the greatest service to the cause of truth.

6. Lt 44, 1886 (May 10, 1886) par. 15 (89%)
Brother Geymet, an Italian, is doing what he can. We tried to educate him. He can talk both French and Italian, so he is fitted for this field. This brother walks up the rugged mountains through the defiles, in paths where precipices are on either side, and where in fogs, which are so common to these mountains, a stranger would most surely imperil his life; but one who is accustomed to these trails can find his way, but he dare not go alone. He is holding meetings in three different villages, one five miles away, another seven, and the other three. He goes on foot to these places, holds his meeting commencing at eight o’clock, and then walks home, getting to his bed about midnight. This is done night after night. W. C. White accompanied him to one place, by name Angronia, meaning the valley of groans. The place was seven miles distant. Mary K. White and I went in a carriage part way, and when we could go no farther because there was no carriage road, we returned and stopped in a pretty village in the narrow valley and inquired for the noted place where so many Protestants perished. We left the carriage, and a venerable-looking man about sixty years of age communicated to us freely the history of the village. Once it was a flourishing village. But the Catholics who had found entrance there burned the village. The inmates of the dwellings were driven out. We were then standing in a beautiful level spot of land clothed with living green. Plum, cherry, and peach trees scattered here and there were in full bloom. Our guide walked along, conversing as he went. Thousands of poor souls were driven to the edge of this level table land which ended abruptly in a deep precipice, from the sides of which projected rugged rocks, sharp and cruel, and were pitched over, and many of their mangled bodies were a prey to the wild beasts or birds. There on those pointed rocks hung for weeks the bodies of pastor, peasant, mother and child, having [been] caught by their clothes. At present there stands a house of worship called Vaudois temple, and at a little distance upon a strong fortification of rocks stands a Catholic church and a monastery. No carriage can reach this from the road some distance below. Our guide informed us that no less than three times had their church been destroyed by fire, and as many times rebuilt. He pointed towards it and the fence and said, We built a strong foundation of stone and then an iron fence with sharp picks on the top, and a Catholic divine asked us what we were doing that for. We answered, You have burned our church three times and we wish to make it as secure as possible, and after we have done all we can on our part we will trust it with God. He said the Catholic flew into a rage and said he was glad they had burned it and wished they would do it again, it ought to be burned. Well the view or the scenery from this point is grand, awful, and awe inspiring. It is indescribable. You look at the mountains reaching thousands of feet above the level of the valley, and there are houses clinging like nests to the brown rocks all up the sides of the valley, terrace after terrace to the very summit. There are houses that are hundreds of years old. These were the places of refuge for the persecuted ones; among God’s mountains was their stronghold and fortress. We turned from this place of interest and stepped into the carriage and carefully descended the steep heights. The Italians dared not drive a carriage along these precipice roads which to avoid the castle-like rocks and high mountains wind up the mountainside like this. We left W. C. White with Bro. Geymet to attend the meeting in the stable. He said there were about fifty present sitting on the mangers, straw, dry leaves, or ground floor. He said he conversed with several before the meeting, and they were deeply interested in the Bible light which has been given to them. They said at first they thought these strange and interesting things were not in the Bible until they began to search their Bibles and found them for themselves. And they were still searching the Scriptures. The Sabbath has been presented, and they want to see the evidence for it themselves.

7. Lt 50, 1892 (March 12, 1892) par. 7 (89%)
Those who can only preach are not missionaries, and never can be until they learn the skill, the watchful, tender compassion of a shepherd. The flock of God have a right to expect to be visited by their pastor, to be instructed, advised, counselled in their own homes. And if a man fails to do this part of the work he cannot be a minister after God’s order. Well, Brother Hare is this kind of preacher. Brother Curtis is this kind of missionary, and the churches that have such labor are disorganized, weak and sickly and ready to die. The sermons are not vitalized by the Spirit of God, because the blessing of God will not rest upon any man who is neglecting the flock of God.

8. Lt 29, 1872 (October 1872) par. 3 (89%)
Your soul should be all aglow with the spirit of the truth you present to others. Then after you have labored to convict souls of the claims the law of God has upon them, teaching them repentance towards God and faith in Jesus Christ, your work is but just begun. Your too frequently excuse yourself from completing the work, and leave a heavy burden for others to take up and finish the work you ought to have done. You say you are not qualified to finish up the work. Then the sooner you qualify yourself to bear the burdens of a shepherd or pastor of the flock, the better.

9. Lt 10, 1878 (February 21, 1878) par. 3 (89%)
I never felt better than in standing before near a thousand people in the Methodist church, addressing them on the subject of temperance. Dr. Jewel pled with me to assist them through the week, but the weather has been so fearfully bad, and I have been sick with cold, I did not dare to venture out. The coming week I shall try to attend the temperance meetings. Dr. Jewel, pastor of the Central Methodist church, says I can have half an hour each evening to address the people. Father went with me, and he prayed in the Spirit.

10. Lt 210, 1901 (May 26, 1901) par. 2 (89%)
Then I presented the Southern field and have received in cash $162.42. I have placed this in Sister Gotzian’s hands, and she will take it to the bank where she does her business and get draft to send you tomorrow. It was reported we had two hundred dollars and 42 cents in cash, but Sister Gotzian, Maggie, and Sara have just counted it while I am writing. I made up my mind to take charge of every dollar that is raised after this, and will not go to any pastor, just myself. I can get a draft as well as anybody else can get a draft. There are about two hundred dollars in pledges that will come in and be sent in draft by Sister Gotzian. The people had not the ready cash. Much of this, I think, came from the outsiders. I shall make a call at Oakland camp-meeting. All were much pleased with the money raised.

11. Ms 88, 1893 (November 24, 1893) par. 16 (89%)
The mother is exhausted with care and privation and sorrow. Her husband died as he had lived, without God or hope in the world. He had consumed all the property they once possessed in gambling and the mother is left with six children, destitute. Two of her oldest girls are in service and this must be the dependence of the family. We secured these rooms, paying one pound per week during the three weeks’ meeting. The poor woman has had deep sorrow. She is a member of the State Church, and her pastor has deeply hurt her soul by his coldness and want of tender sympathy for her in her affliction.

12. Christian Experience and Teachings of Ellen G. White, p. 32.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Not long after receiving this great blessing, I attended a conference meeting at the Christian church, where Elder Brown was pastor. I was invited to relate my experience, and felt not only great freedom of expression, but happiness, in telling my simple story of the love of Jesus and the joy of being accepted of God. As I spoke, with subdued heart and tearful eyes, my soul seemed drawn toward heaven in thanksgiving. The melting power of the Lord came upon the assembled people. Many were weeping and others praising God.

13. Historical Sketches of the Foreign Missions of the Seventh-day Adventists, p. 163.4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Thursday we took the cars for London. Here we had the pleasure of meeting Eld. W. M. Jones, editor and publisher of the Sabbath Memorial, and pastor of an S. D. Baptist church in London, where he has for many years stood in defense of the Bible Sabbath. We appreciated his kindness in accompanying us to the British Museum, and in explaining to us many things of interest. It would have been pleasant and profitable to spend considerable time among these interesting relics; but we were obliged to be content with only a few hours here in order that we might meet appointments at Southampton.

14. Historical Sketches of the Foreign Missions of the Seventh-day Adventists, p. 244.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The pastors in many cases are ignorant of the Scriptures and of the power of God, and they feed themselves instead of feeding the flock. At one of their late synods it was proposed that each pastor should visit every member of his congregation at least once a year; but with almost unanimous voice they objected to the measure, some saying that if it was insisted upon they would resign their charge. With many of them religion is a mere form, and they are doing comparatively nothing to advance the temporal or spiritual interests of their flock. The people are perishing in ignorance, while those who claim to be religious teachers take from them the key of knowledge. They enter not in themselves, and those who would enter in they hinder.

15. Christian Service, p. 70.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
In some respects the pastor occupies a position similar to that of the foreman of a gang of laboring men or the captain of a ship's crew. They are expected to see that the men over whom they are set, do the work assigned to them correctly and promptly, and only in case of emergency are they to execute in detail. The owner of a large mill once found his superintendent in a wheel-pit, making some simple repairs, while a half-dozen workmen in that line were standing by, idly looking on. The proprietor, after learning the facts, so as to be sure that no injustice was done, called the foreman to his office and handed him his discharge with full pay. In surprise the foreman asked for an explanation. It was given in these words: “I employed you to keep six men at work. I found the six idle, and you doing the work of but one. Your work could have been done just as well by any one of the six. I cannot afford to pay the wages of seven for you to teach the six how to be idle.”

16. The Great Controversy 1888, p. 128.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Luther, though still a papist of the straitest sort, was filled with horror at the blasphemous assumptions of the indulgence-mongers. Many of his own congregation had purchased certificates of pardon, and they soon began to come to their pastor, confessing their various sins, and expecting absolution, not because they were penitent and wished to reform, but on the ground of the indulgence. Luther refused them absolution, and warned them that unless they should repent and reform their lives, they must perish in their sins. In great perplexity they repaired to Tetzel with the complaint that their confessor had refused his certificates; and some boldly demanded that their money be returned to them. The friar was filled with rage. He uttered the most terrible curses, caused fires to be lighted in the public squares, and declared that he had orders from the pope “to burn the heretics who dared oppose his most holy indulgences.”

17. The Great Controversy 1888, p. 179.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
A strong impetus was given to the reform, by the appearance of the plague, or the “great death,” which swept over Switzerland in the year 1519. As men were thus brought face to face with the destroyer, many were led to feel how vain and worthless were the pardons which they had so lately purchased; and they longed for a surer foundation for their faith. Zwingle at Zurich was smitten down; he was brought so low that all hope of his recovery was relinquished, and the report was widely circulated that he was dead. In that trying hour his hope and courage were unshaken. He looked in faith to the cross of Calvary, trusting in the all-sufficient propitiation for sin. When he came back from the gates of death, it was to preach the gospel with greater fervor than ever before; and his words exerted an unwonted power. The people welcomed with joy their beloved pastor, returned to them from the brink of the grave. They themselves had come from attending upon the sick and the dying, and they felt, as never before, the value of the gospel.

18. The Great Controversy 1888, p. 182.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The disputation was appointed to be held at Baden; but Zwingle was not present. The Council of Zurich, suspecting the designs of the papists, and warned by the burning piles kindled in the popish cantons for confessors of the gospel, forbade their pastor to expose himself to this peril. At Zurich he was ready to meet all the partisans that Rome might send; but to go to Baden, where the blood of martyrs for the truth had just been shed, was to go to certain death. Oecolampadius and Haller were chosen to represent the reformers, while the famous Doctor Eck, supported by a host of learned doctors and prelates, was the champion of Rome.

19. The Great Controversy 1888, p. 253.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Baxter, Flavel, Alleine, and other men of talent, education, and deep Christian experience, stood up in valiant defense of the faith which was once delivered to the saints. The work accomplished by these men, prescribed and outlawed by the rulers of this world, can never perish. Flavel's “Fountain of Life” and “Method of Grace” have taught thousands how to commit the keeping of their souls to Christ. Baxter's “Reformed Pastor” has proved a blessing to many who desire a revival of the work of God, and his “Saint's Everlasting Rest” has done its work in leading souls to the “rest that remaineth for the people of God.”

20. The Great Controversy 1888, p. 291.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
When first constrained to separate from the English church, the Puritans had joined themselves together by a solemn covenant, as the Lord's free people, “to walk in all his ways, made known or to be made known to them.” Here was the true spirit of reform, the vital principle of Protestantism. It was with this purpose that the Pilgrims departed from Holland to find a home in the New World. John Robinson, their pastor, who was providentially prevented from accompanying them, in his farewell address to the exiles said:—

21. The Great Controversy 1888, p. 376.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
At a meeting of the presbytery of Philadelphia, Mr. Barnes, author of the commentary so widely used, and pastor of one of the leading churches in that city, “stated that he had been in the ministry for twenty years, and never till the last communion had he administered the ordinance without receiving more or less into the church. But now there are no awakenings, no conversions, not much apparent growth in grace in professors, and none come to his study to converse about the salvation of their souls. With the increase of business, and the brightening prospects of commerce and manufactures, there is an increase of worldly-mindedness. Thus it is with all denominations.”

22. The Great Controversy 1888, p. 688.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Note 11. Page 573—These movements are apparent under diverse forms and in different ways, but the organization which embodies almost every form, and works in every way to gain its end, is the National Reform Association. It originated in a conference representing “eleven different denominations of Christians from seven of the states of the Union.” It now has the support of prominent men from “all branches of the church,” of the National Woman's Christian Temperance Union, and the Prohibition Party. It proposes to have our national constitution amended, “in order to constitute a Christian government,” “acknowledging almighty God as the source of all authority and power in civil government, the Lord Jesus Christ as the ruler among the nations, His revealed will as the supreme law of the land;” and so placing “all Christian laws, institutions, and usages of our government on an undeniable legal basis in the fundamental law of the land.” One of its propositions, announced by David Gregg, D. D., Pastor Park Street Church, Boston, is that the state has “the right to command the consciences of men.” Another, announced by the Christian Statesman, is that government must “enforce upon all that come among us the laws of Christian morality.” Another, announced by the Rev. E. B. Graham, is that “if the opponents of the Bible do not like our government and its Christian features, let them go to some wild, desolate land; and, in the name of the devil, and for the sake of the devil, subdue it, and set up a government of their own on infidel and atheistic ideas, and then, if they can stand it, stay there till they die.” Another, announced by Jonathan Edwards, D. D., is that Jews, and all Christians who keep the seventh day, are to be classed as atheists, and “must be treated, as for this [National Reform] question, one party” with atheists, who “cannot dwell together on the same continent” with

23. The Retirement Years, p. 41.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The old-fashioned pastor, who traveled on horseback and spent much time in visiting his flock, enjoyed much better health, notwithstanding his hardships and exposures, than our ministers of today, who avoid all physical exertion as far as possible and confine themselves to their books.

24. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 6, p. 95.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The Pastor's Work. Candidates who have grown to manhood and womanhood should understand their duty better than do the younger ones; but the pastor of the church has a duty to do for these souls. Have they wrong habits and practices? It is the duty of the pastor to have special meetings with them. Give them Bible readings, converse and pray with them, and plainly show the claims of the Lord upon them. Read to them the teaching of the Bible in regard to conversion. Show what is the fruit of conversion, the evidence that they love God. Show that true conversion is a change of heart, of thoughts and purposes. Evil habits are to be given up. The sins of evil-speaking, of jealousy, of disobedience, are to be put away. A warfare must be waged against every evil trait of character. Then the believing one can understandingly take to himself the promise: “Ask, and it shall be given you.” Matthew 7:7.

25. Testimonies on Sexual Behavior, Adultery, and Divorce, p. 232.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“The present difficulty is as to whether or not Brother E should be made elder of the Birmingham church, the largest, and now the most influential church in the Conference, as the Conference headquarters are located in Birmingham. The church is disagreed upon the point in question, and it is having a bad influence upon the work in the city and a more or less deleterious effect throughout the Conference. The majority think, because of his capabilities and his late work in the city (as stated in Elder McVagh's letter, a copy of which is herein enclosed), that he should be made elder of the church and act as its pastor, or leader, while others do not favor it because of his life record, and also think that those who have dealt with him in the past should give counsel, and advise as to his becoming elder of the church.

26. Sketches from the Life of Paul, p. 200.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“Wherefore I take you to record this day, that I am pure from the blood of all men; for I have not shunned to declare unto you all the counsel of God.” No fear of giving offense, no desire for friendship or applause, could lead him to withhold the words which God had given him for their instruction, warning, or correction. The minister of Christ is not to present to the people those truths that are most pleasing, while he withholds others which might cause them pain. He should watch with deep solicitude the development of character. If he sees that any of his flock are cherishing sin, he must as a faithful shepherd give them instruction from God's word applicable to their case. Should he permit them in their self-confidence to go on in sin unwarned, he would be held responsible for their blood. The pastor who fulfills his high commission must instruct his people in every point of the Christian faith, all that they ought to be or to do, in order to stand perfect in the day of God.

27. Gospel Workers 1892, p. 70.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
We are living in a most solemn time. All have a work to do requiring diligence. Especially is this true of the pastor, who is to care for and feed the flock of God. The one whose special work it is to lead the people into the path of truth, should be an able expositor of the word, capable of adapting his teachings to the wants of the people. He should be so closely connected with Heaven as to become a living channel of light, a mouth-piece for God.

28. Gospel Workers 1892, p. 70.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
A pastor should have a correct understanding of the word and also of the human character. Our faith is unpopular. The people are unwilling to be convinced that they are so deeply in error; a great work is to be done, and at present there are but few to do it. One man usually performs the labor which should be shared by two; for the work of the evangelist is necessarily combined with that of the pastor, bringing a double burden upon the worker in the field.

29. Gospel Workers 1892, p. 76.4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The duties of a pastor are often shamefully neglected because the minister lacks strength to sacrifice his personal inclinations for seclusion and study. The pastor should visit from house to house among his flock, teaching, conversing, and praying with each family, and looking out for the welfare of their souls. Those who have manifested a desire to become acquainted with the principles of our faith should not be neglected, but thoroughly instructed in the truth. No opportunity to do good should be lost by the watchful and zealous minister of God.

30. Gospel Workers 1892, p. 77.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
People are easily reached through the avenues of the social circle. But many ministers dread the task of visiting; they have not cultivated social qualities, have not acquired that genial spirit that wins its way to the hearts of the people. It is highly important that a pastor should mingle much with his people, that he may become acquainted with the different phases of human nature, readily understand the workings of the mind, adapt his teachings to the intellect of his people, and learn that grand charity possessed only by those who closely study the nature and needs of men.

31. Gospel Workers 1892, p. 77.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Those who seclude themselves from the people are in no condition to help them. A skillful physician must understand the nature of various diseases, and must have a thorough knowledge of the human structure. He must be prompt in attending to the patients. He knows that delays are dangerous. When his experienced hand is laid upon the pulse of the sufferer, and he carefully notes the peculiar indication of the malady, his previous knowledge enables him to determine concerning the nature of the disease and the treatment necessary to arrest its progress. As the physician deals with physical disease, so does the pastor minister to the sin-sick soul. And his work is as much more important than that of the former as eternal life is more valuable than temporal existence. The pastor meets with an endless variety of temperaments; and it is his duty to become acquainted with the members of families that listen to his teachings, in order to determine what means will best influence them in the right direction.

32. Gospel Workers 1892, p. 80.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The old-fashioned pastor, who traveled on horseback, and spent much time in visiting his flock, enjoyed much better health, notwithstanding his hardships and exposures, than our ministers of today, who avoid all physical exertion as far as possible, and confine themselves to their books.

33. Gospel Workers 1892, p. 101.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“In some respects the pastor occupies a position similar to that of the foreman of a gang of laboring men or the captain of a ship's crew. They are expected to see that the men over whom they are set, do the work assigned to them correctly and promptly, and if occasion shall require it, only in case of emergency are they to execute in detail.

34. Gospel Workers 1892, p. 251.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
When a minister bearing the solemn message of warning to the world, receives the hospitable courtesies of friends and brethren, and neglects the duties of a shepherd of the flock, and is careless in his example and deportment, engaging with the young in trifling conversation, in jesting and joking, and in relating humorous anecdotes to create laughter, he is unworthy of being a gospel minister, and needs to be converted before he should be entrusted with the care of the sheep and lambs. Ministers who are neglectful of the duties devolving on a faithful pastor, give evidence that they are not sanctified by the truths they present to others, and should not be sustained as laborers in the vineyard of the Lord, till they have a high sense of the sacredness of the work of a minister of Christ.—Testimonies for the Church 3:233.

35. Life Sketches of James White and Ellen G. White 1880, p. 162.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“I occasionally attended the Christian church, where Elder Brown was pastor. During a conference meeting I was invited to relate my experience, which was considered a marked one, and I felt not only great freedom of expression, but happiness in telling my simple story of the love of Jesus and the joy of being accepted of God. I told of my wonderful deliverance from the bondage of doubt and despair, and the joy that I experienced in the hope of salvation. As I spoke in simple language, with subdued heart and tearful eyes, my soul seemed drawn toward heaven in an ecstasy of thanksgiving. The melting power of the Lord came upon the assembled people. Many were weeping and others praising God.

36. Life Sketches of James White and Ellen G. White 1888, p. 162.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“I occasionally attended the Christian church, where Elder Brown was pastor. During a conference meeting I was invited to relate my experience, which was considered a marked one, and I felt not only great freedom of expression, but happiness in telling my simple story of the love of Jesus and the joy of being accepted of God. I told of my wonderful deliverance from the bondage of doubt and despair, and the joy that I experienced in the hope of salvation. As I spoke in simple language, with subdued heart and tearful eyes, my soul seemed drawn toward heaven in an ecstasy of thanksgiving. The melting power of the Lord came upon the assembled people. Many were weeping and others praising God.

37. Peter’s Counsel to Parents, p. 50.4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
But there's a second reason for daily spiritual help. A church with high ideals for its young necessarily has high standards. Now, if high or rigorous standards are left unexplained, if they aren't imaginatively adapted to a child's daily routine, they quickly become burdensome and oppressive to a young person. And a child may obey for a while. He may attempt to please a parent or a teacher or a pastor, but if he does so without enthusiasm for the church's standards and ideals, he is subtly developing the character of a rebel. In another place Ellen White warns, “A sullen submission to the will of the father will develop the character of a rebel. The service is looked upon by such a one in the light of drudgery. It is not rendered cheerfully and in the love of God. It is a mere mechanical performance.”—That I May Know Him, 120.

38. The Southern Work, p. 7.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The informed reader is well acquainted with the great strides that have been made by the race so misused and sadly neglected, and he knows, too, that the church, stirred to action, increasingly accepted the challenge to missionary witness so urgently placed before it. The result is that in the United States we have proportionately more members among the colored people than among the caucasians. Competent negro personnel fill positions of responsibility and trust in the institutions and organizations of the church from the local pastor and church-school teacher to its General Conference staff.

39. Pastoral Ministry, p. 13.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
From the rich treasury of her writings, the compilers of this book have brought together a selection of inspired counsels that apply most directly to the life and work of the local church pastor. Research was done by the General Conference Ministerial Association using the CD-ROM, 1990 edition, of The Published Ellen G. White Writings. It was discovered that Mrs. White used some derivative of the word Clergy 114 times, Minister 10,762 times, Pastor 385 times, Preacher 735 times, and Shepherd 1,540 times. Research focused especially on these quotes. The goal was to be complete, but not exhaustive; that is, to include material on every area of pastoral ministry, but not to quote every statement she made on each. Thus the principles are set forth, but not repeated unnecessarily.

40. Pastoral Ministry, p. 14.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The White Estate acknowledges with appreciation the work of the staff of the General Conference Ministerial Association in producing this valuable compilation. It is the earnest prayer both of the Ministerial Association and of the White Estate that as you read this book you may receive a rich blessing. May your Christian experience deepen and your ministry be strengthened as you study from the early chapters, which deal with the pastor's personal relationship with Christ, to the final chapter, which summarizes lessons from the ministry of Jesus, the model Pastor.

41. Pastoral Ministry, p. 88.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Shepherds who fail at home will fail at church—He who is engaged in the work of the gospel ministry must be faithful in his family life. It is as essential that as a father he should improve the talents God has given him for the purpose of making the home a symbol of the heavenly family, as that in the work of the ministry, he should make use of his God-given powers to win souls for the church. As the priest in the home, and as the ambassador of Christ in the church, he should exemplify in his life the character of Christ. He must be faithful in watching for souls as one that must give an account. In his service there must be seen no carelessness and inattentive work. God will not serve with the sins of men who have not a clear sense of the sacred responsibility involved in accepting a position as pastor of a church. He who fails to be a faithful, discerning shepherd in the home, will surely fail of being a faithful shepherd of the flock of God in the church.—Manuscript Releases 6:49.

42. Pastoral Ministry, p. 102.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
When alienation exists between pastor and people, something should be done immediately—The subject of the Christian ministry must be set in a new light before the minds of the people. I entreat of you to study the Word of God on this point. If you think a minister is making mistakes, it is your duty to go to him in love and meekness and present the matter before him. You may not have a correct idea of his motive or work, and under misapprehension may grow cold to him, close the door of your heart, and fail to receive his message or appreciate his labors. Where alienation exists between a minister and the people, there is something decidedly wrong, either in him or the church members, and something should be done immediately to work a reform in whoever may be the erring party. He should not be left to wonder what all this coldness and indifference means. He should not be left to seek in vain to find out why he cannot reach the hearts of the people with the message God has given him, and to question why it is that the door of the heart has been closed; for he can realize there is no affection for him, and can have no fellowship with the people for whom he is sent to labor. Has he dropped a word, or done a deed which has wounded you in some way, and he does not know that it has hurt you? Then go to him, tell him his faults between him and you alone, and have the coldness and bitterness of spirit that has been created by an unwitting act on his part, changed to respect and love.—The Review and Herald, July 25, 1893.

43. Pastoral Ministry, p. 127.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Ministers must learn to work differently with each individual type of temperament—As the physician deals with physical disease, so does the pastor minister to the sin-sick soul. And his work is as much more important than that of the physician as eternal life is more valuable than temporal existence. The pastor meets with an endless variety of temperaments, and it is his duty to become acquainted with the members of the families that listen to his teachings in order to determine what means will best influence them in the right direction.—Gospel Workers, 338.

44. Pastoral Ministry, p. 131.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Ministers satisfied with the stimulus of sensational meetings must also learn to do personal work—Close investigation reveals the fact that there are but very few sheaves to be gathered after these specially exciting meetings. Yet, from all the experience of the past, you have not learned to change your manner of labor. You have been slow to learn how to shape your future labors in such a manner as to shun the errors of the past. The reason of this has been, that, like the inebriate, you love the stimulus of these sensational meetings; you long for them as the drunkard longs for a glass of liquor to arouse his flagging energies. These debates, which create an excitement, are mistaken for zeal for God and love for the truth. You have been almost destitute of the Spirit of God to work with your efforts. If you had God with you in all your moves, and if you felt a burden for souls and had the wisdom to skillfully manage these exciting seasons to press souls into the kingdom of Christ, you could see fruits of your labors, and God would be glorified. Your soul should be all aglow with the spirit of the truth you present to others. After you have labored to convict souls of the claims that the law of God has upon them, teaching them repentance toward God and faith in Christ, then your work is but just begun. You too frequently excuse yourself from completing the work and leave a heavy burden for others to take up in finishing the work that you ought to have done. You say that you are not qualified to finish up the work. Then the sooner you qualify yourself to bear the burdens of a shepherd, or pastor, of the flock, the better.—Testimonies for the Church 3:227.

45. Pastoral Ministry, p. 147 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Church Work Shared by Pastor and People

46. Pastoral Ministry, p. 188.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Many ministers take their text from St. Paul and preach from the newspapers—Flowery discourses will not be sufficient to feed the soul of the famishing child of God. The following desire will give a voice to the longing of many a heart that is fed on what are called “smart sermons.” An intelligent man remarked, “O that my pastor would give me something besides pretty flowers, and brilliant periods, and intellectual treats! My soul is famishing for the Bread of Life. I long for something simple and nourishing and scriptural.” Daniel Webster gave utterance to these forcible words: “If clergymen in our day would return to the simplicity of gospel truth, and preach more to individuals and less to the crowd, there would not be so much complaint of the decline of true religion. Many of the ministers of the present day take their text from St. Paul, and preach from the newspapers. When they do so, I prefer to enjoy my own thoughts, rather than listen. I want my pastor to come to me in the Spirit of the gospel, saying, `You are mortal. Your probation is brief, your work must be done speedily.... You are hastening to the bar of God. The Judge standeth before the door. ’”—The Review and Herald, June 23, 1891.

47. Pastoral Ministry, p. 206.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Have special meetings with new members—Candidates who have grown to manhood and womanhood should understand their duty better than do the younger ones; but the pastor of the church has a duty to do for these souls. Have they wrong habits and practices? It is the duty of the pastor to have special meetings with them. Give them Bible readings, converse and pray with them, and plainly show the claims of the Lord upon them. Read to them the teaching of the Bible in regard to conversion. Show what is the fruit of conversion, the evidence that they love God. Show that true conversion is a change of heart, of thoughts and purposes. Evil habits are to be given up. The sins of evil-speaking, of jealousy, of disobedience, are to be put away. A warfare must be waged against every evil trait of character. Then the believing one can understandingly take to himself the promise: “Ask, and it shall be given you.”—Testimonies for the Church 6:95.

48. Pastoral Ministry, p. 215.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The pastor needs to understand an endless variety of temperaments—As the physician deals with physical disease, so does the pastor minister to the sin-sick soul. And his work is as much more important than that of the physician as eternal life is more valuable than temporal existence. The pastor meets with an endless variety of temperaments, and it is his duty to become acquainted with the members of the families that listen to his teachings in order to determine what means will best influence them in the right direction.—Gospel Workers, 338.

49. Pastoral Ministry, p. 223.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
One pastor said he would rather be horse-whipped than visit—Elder H used to live here and preach to the people, but he was not a shepherd of the flock. He would tell the poor sheep that he would rather be horse-whipped than visit. He neglected personal labor, therefore pastoral work was not done in the church and its borders. The deacons and elders of the church have acted wisely and worked judiciously to keep the church in order, and we find the people in a much better condition than we had expected. We are happily disappointed. But when I look over the years, and think of what might have been done, if the man entrusted with the flock had been a faithful steward of God, watching for souls as one that must give an account, my heart is made sad. Had the preacher done the work of a pastor, a much larger number would now be rejoicing in the truth.—Manuscript Releases 9:343, 344.

50. Pastoral Ministry, p. 223.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Seclusion and study must not supersede visitation—The duties of a pastor are often shamelessly neglected because the minister lacks strength to sacrifice his personal inclinations for seclusion and study. The pastor should visit from house to house among his flock, teaching, conversing, and praying with each family, and looking out for the welfare of their souls. Those who have manifested a desire to become acquainted with the principles of our faith should not be neglected, but thoroughly instructed in the truth.—Evangelism, 350.

51. Pastoral Ministry, p. 223.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Ministers who sermonize without shepherding should be dismissed—But there have been solemn duties neglected in accepting ministers to labor in word and doctrine who can only preach. They do not watch for souls as they that shall give an account. They sermonize; but the work is left undone which the sheep and lambs need to have done for them. And this half-hearted kind of work has been done all through America, and money paid to men employed, when they should have been dismissed to find work less responsible and care taking.... The flock of God have a right to expect to be visited by their pastor, to be instructed, advised, counseled, in their own homes. And if a man fails to do this part of the work, he can not be a minister after God's order. The churches that have such labor are disorganized, weak, and sickly, and ready to die. The sermons are not vitalized by the Spirit of God, because the blessing of God will not rest upon any man who is neglecting the flock of God.—Appeal and Suggestions to Conference Officers (Ph 2), 17, 18.

52. Pastoral Ministry, p. 224.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Visit with a purpose—Many love to preach, but shun the labor that is required to lift souls out of sin. Men are dying all around us, and we have not made any special efforts to address them earnestly, interestedly, affectionately, as Christ would have done had he been on the earth. We are Christ's ambassadors, watchmen unto the house of Israel, to see the dangers that await souls, and give them warning. The pastor is a shepherd of the sheep, guarding them, feeding them, warning them, reproving them, or encouraging them, as the case may require. There is visiting to be done, not to have a pleasant chat, but to do the work required of a watchman. There should be earnest conversation and prayer with these souls. This is the kind of work that gains valuable experience in the upbuilding of Christ's kingdom.—The Review and Herald, October 20, 1896.

53. Pastoral Ministry, p. 235 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
52. Jesus as Model Pastor

54. Pastoral Ministry, p. 247.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
People are easily reached through social avenues—People are easily reached through the avenues of the social circle.... It is highly important that a pastor should mingle much with his people, that he may become acquainted with the different phases of human nature, readily understand the workings of the mind, adapt his teachings to the intellect of his people, and learn that grand charity possessed only by those who closely study the nature and needs of men.—Testimonies for the Church 4:266.

55. Pastoral Ministry, p. 264 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Worship Service When No Pastor Present

56. Pastoral Ministry, p. 281 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Chapter 52—Jesus as Model Pastor

57. Counsels for the Church, p. 297.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Candidates who have grown to manhood and womanhood should understand their duty better than do the younger ones; but the pastor of the church has a duty to do for these souls. Have they wrong habits and practices? It is the duty of the pastor to have special meetings with them. Give them Bible readings, converse and pray with them, and plainly show the claims of the Lord upon them. Read to them the teaching of the Bible in regard to conversion. Show what is the fruit of conversion, the evidence that they love God. Show that true conversion is a change of heart, of thoughts and purposes. Evil habits are to be given up. The sins of evil-speaking, of jealousy, of disobedience, are to be put away. A warfare must be waged against every evil trait of character. Then the believing one can understandingly take to himself the promise: “Ask, and it shall be given you.” Matthew 7:7. 544 Testimonies for the Church 6:91-99

58. The Spirit of Prophecy, vol. 4, p. 88.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
God had preserved his servant for more important labors. Wycliffe, like his Master, preached the gospel to the poor. As a professor of theology, he presented the truth to the students under his instruction, and received the title of “The Gospel Doctor.” In his parish he addressed the people as a friend and pastor.

59. The Spirit of Prophecy, vol. 4, p. 104.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Luther, though still a papist of the straitest sort, was filled with horror at the blasphemous assumptions of the indulgence-mongers. Many of his own congregation had purchased certificates of pardon, and they soon began to come to their pastor, confessing their various sins, and expecting absolution, not because they were penitent and wished to reform, but on the ground of the indulgence. Luther refused them absolution, and warned them that unless they should repent, and reform their lives, they must perish in their sins. In great perplexity they sought out Tetzel, and informed him that an Augustine monk had treated his letters with contempt. The friar was filled with rage. He uttered the most terrible curses, caused fires to be lighted in the public square, and declared that he had orders from the pope to burn the heretics who dared oppose his most holy indulgences.

60. The Spirit of Prophecy, vol. 4, p. 175.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Baxter, Flavel, Alleine, and other men of talent, education, and deep Christian experience, stood up in valiant defense of “the faith once delivered to the saints.” The work accomplished by these men, proscribed and outlawed by the rulers of this world, can never perish. Flavel's “Fountain of Life” and “Method of Grace” have taught thousands how to commit the keeping of their souls to Christ. Baxter's “Reformed Pastor” has proved a blessing to many who desire a revival of the work of God, and his “Saints’ Everlasting Rest” has done its work in leading souls to the “rest that remaineth for the people of God.”

61. Gospel Workers 1915, p. 131.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
When a minister bearing the solemn message of warning to the world, receives the hospitable courtesies of friends and brethren, and neglects the duties of a shepherd of the flock, and is careless in his example and deportment, engaging with the young in trifling conversation, in jesting and joking, and in relating humorous anecdotes to create laughter, he is unworthy of being a gospel minister, and needs to be converted before he is entrusted with the care of the sheep and lambs. Ministers who are neglectful of the duties devolving on a faithful pastor, give evidence that they are not sanctified by the truths they present to others, and should not be sustained as laborers in the vineyard of the Lord till they have a high sense of the sacredness of the work of a minister.—Testimonies for the Church 3:233.

62. Gospel Workers 1915, p. 191.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
It is highly important that a pastor mingle much with his people, and thus become acquainted with the different phases of human nature. He should study the workings of the mind, that he may adapt his teachings to the intellect of his hearers. He will thus learn that grand charity which is possessed only by those who study closely the nature and needs of men.

63. Gospel Workers 1915, p. 197.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“In some respects the pastor occupies a position similar to that of the foreman of a gang of laboring men or the captain of a ship's crew. They are expected to see that the men over whom they are set, do the work assigned to them correctly and promptly, and only in case of emergency are they to execute in detail.

64. Gospel Workers 1915, p. 198.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Some, through inexperience, will make mistakes, but they should be kindly shown how they can do their work better. Thus the pastor can be educating men and women to bear responsibilities in the good work that is suffering so much for want of laborers. We need men who can take responsibilities; and the best way for them to gain the experience they need, is to engage with heart and mind in the work.

65. Gospel Workers 1915, p. 337.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The duties of a pastor are often shamelessly neglected because the minister lacks strength to sacrifice his personal inclinations for seclusion and study. The pastor should visit from house to house among his flock, teaching, conversing, and praying with each family, and looking out for the welfare of their souls. Those who have manifested a desire to become acquainted with the principles of our faith should not be neglected, but thoroughly instructed in the truth.

66. Gospel Workers 1915, p. 338.4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
As the physician deals with physical disease, so does the pastor minister to the sin-sick soul. And his work is as much more important than that of the physician as eternal life is more valuable than temporal existence. The pastor meets with an endless variety of temperaments; and it is his duty to become acquainted with the members of the families that listen to his teachings, in order to determine what means will best influence them in the right direction.

67. Life Sketches of Ellen G. White, p. 40.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Not long after receiving this great blessing, I attended a conference meeting at the Christian church, where Elder Brown was pastor. I was invited to relate my experience, and felt not only great freedom of expression, but happiness, in telling my simple story of the love of Jesus and the joy of being accepted of God. As I spoke, with subdued heart and tearful eyes, my soul seemed drawn toward heaven in thanksgiving. The melting power of the Lord came upon the assembled people. Many were weeping and others praising God.

68. Life Sketches of Ellen G. White, p. 464.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The service was impressive throughout. Singers, [The singers were Mrs. H. M. Dunlap, Miss Florence Howell, Mrs. George R. Israel, Miss Nenna Dunlap, Prof. Frederick Griggs, Mr. M. H. Minier, Dr. M. A. Farnsworth, and Mr. Frank W. Hubbard.] pallbearers, [The pallbearers were Elders I. H. Evans, president of the North American Division Conference; W. T. Knox, treasurer of the General Conference; G. B. Thompson, secretary of the North American Division Conference; Prof. Frederick Griggs, educational secretary of the General Conference; F. M. Wilcox, editor of the Advent Review and Sabbath Herald; and G. E. Langdon, pastor of the Battle Creek Tabernacle Church.] and ministers [The ministers were Elders A. G. Daniells, president of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists (in charge of the service); S. N. Haskell, of South Lancaster, Mass.; M. C. Wilcox, of Mountain View, Cal.; C. B. Stephenson, of Atlanta, Ga.; William Covert, of Aurora, Ill.; L. H. Christian, of Chicago, Ill. Elder George I. Butler, of Bowling Green, Fla., Long a close associate of Elder and Mrs. James White in administrative affairs, had been invited by the General Conference to assist in the service, but was unable to be present.] ascended to the rostrum, kneeling for a few moments in silent prayer. Then the choir sang:

69. Mind, Character, and Personality, vol. 1, p. 226.6 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Sympathetic Pastor—Be men of God, on the gaining side. Knowledge is within the reach of all who desire it. God designs the mind shall become strong, thinking deeper, fuller, clearer. Walk with God as did Enoch; make God your counselor and you cannot but make improvement....

70. Mind, Character, and Personality, vol. 1, p. 227.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Then this sympathizing pastor puts in a chapter of his own experience; that his wife was not the woman of his choice; that there is no real affinity between them. He does not love his wife. She does not meet his expectations. The barrier is thus broken down, and women are seduced. They believe their life is one great disappointment, and this shepherd has great sympathy for his flock. Lovesick sentimentalism is encouraged, and the mind and soul is spoiled of its purity, if this kind of work does not result in the breaking of the seventh commandment.

71. Counsels on Health, p. 194.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The old-fashioned pastor, who traveled on horseback, and spent much time in visiting his flock, enjoyed much better health, notwithstanding his hardships and exposures, than our ministers of today, who avoid all physical exertion as far as possible and confine themselves to their books.

72. Evangelism, p. 116 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Relationship of Evangelist and Pastor

73. Evangelism, p. 116.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Evangelist-Pastor—One man usually performs the labor which should be shared by two; for the work of the evangelist is necessarily combined with that of the pastor, bringing a double burden upon the worker in the field.—Testimonies For The Church 4:260 (1876).

74. Evangelism, p. 311.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Preparing Young People for Baptism—Candidates who have grown to manhood and womanhood should understand their duty better than do the younger ones; but the pastor of the church has a duty to do for these souls. Have they wrong habits and practices? It is the duty of the pastor to have special meetings with them. Give them Bible readings, converse and pray with them, and plainly show the claims of the Lord upon them. Read to them the teaching of the Bible in regard to conversion. Show what is the fruit of conversion, the evidence that they love God. Show that true conversion is a change of heart, of thoughts and purposes. Evil habits are to be given up. The sins of evil-speaking, of jealousy, of disobedience, are to be put away. A warfare must be waged against every evil trait of character. Then the believing one can understandingly take to himself the promise, “Ask, and it shall be given you.” Matthew 7:7.—Testimonies For The Church 6:95 (1900).

75. Evangelism, p. 350.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Neglecting the Work for Reading and Study—The duties of a pastor are often shamelessly neglected because the minister lacks strength to sacrifice his personal inclinations for seclusion and study. The pastor should visit from house to house among his flock, teaching, conversing, and praying with each family, and looking out for the welfare of their souls. Those who have manifested a desire to become acquainted with the principles of our faith should not be neglected, but thoroughly instructed in the truth.—Gospel Workers, 337 (1915).

76. Evangelism, p. 662.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The old-fashioned pastor, who traveled on horseback, and spent much time in visiting his flock, enjoyed much better health, notwithstanding his hardships and exposures, than our ministers of today, who avoid all physical exertion as far as possible, and confine themselves to their books.

77. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 1, p. 33.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Not long after receiving this great blessing, I attended a conference meeting at the Christian church, where Elder Brown was pastor. I was invited to relate my experience, and I felt not only great freedom of expression, but happiness, in telling my simple story of the love of Jesus and the joy of being accepted of God. As I spoke, with subdued heart and tearful eyes, my soul seemed drawn toward heaven in thanksgiving. The melting power of the Lord came upon the assembled people. Many were weeping and others praising God.

78. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 3, p. 227.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Close investigation reveals the fact that there are but very few sheaves to be gathered after these specially exciting meetings. Yet, from all the experience of the past, you have not learned to change your manner of labor. You have been slow to learn how to shape your future labors in such a manner as to shun the errors of the past. The reason of this has been, that, like the inebriate, you love the stimulus of these sensational meetings; you long for them as the drunkard longs for a glass of liquor to arouse his flagging energies. These debates, which create an excitement, are mistaken for zeal for God and love for the truth. You have been almost destitute of the Spirit of God to work with your efforts. If you had God with you in all your moves, and if you felt a burden for souls and had the wisdom to skillfully manage these exciting seasons to press souls into the kingdom of Christ, you could see fruits of your labors, and God would be glorified. Your soul should be all aglow with the spirit of the truth you present to others. After you have labored to convict souls of the claims that the law of God has upon them, teaching them repentance toward God and faith in Christ, then your work is but just begun. You too frequently excuse yourself from completing the work and leave a heavy burden for others to take up in finishing the work that you ought to have done. You say that you are not qualified to finish up the work. Then the sooner you qualify yourself to bear the burdens of a shepherd, or pastor, of the flock, the better.

79. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 3, p. 232.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Ministers of Christ should feel it a duty binding upon them, if they receive the hospitalities of their brethren or friends, to leave a blessing with the family by seeking to encourage and strengthen its members. They should not neglect the duties of a pastor, as they visit from house to house. They should become familiar with every member of the family, that they may understand the spiritual condition of all, and vary their manner of labor to meet the case of each. When a minister bearing the solemn message of warning to the world receives the hospitable courtesies of friends and brethren, and neglects the duties of a shepherd of the flock and is careless in his example and deportment, engaging with the young in trifling conversation, in jesting and joking, and in relating humorous anecdotes to create laughter, he is unworthy of being a gospel minister and needs to be converted before he should be entrusted with the care of the sheep and lambs. Ministers who are neglectful of the duties devolving on a faithful pastor give evidence that they are not sanctified by the t

80. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 3, p. 342.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The best efforts of the meekest man upon the earth could not quell their insubordination. The unselfish interest of Moses was rewarded with jealousy, suspicion, and calumny. His humble shepherd's life was far more peaceful and happy than his present position as pastor of that vast congregation of turbulent spirits. Their unreasonable jealousies were more difficult to manage than the fierce wolves of the wilderness. But Moses dared not choose his own course and do as best pleased himself. He had left the shepherd's crook at God's command and in its place had received a rod of power. He dared not lay down this scepter and resign his position till God should dismiss him.

81. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 4, p. 260.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
We are living in a most solemn time. All have a work to do requiring diligence. Especially is this true of the pastor, who is to care for and feed the flock of God. The one whose special work it is to lead the people into the path of truth, should be an able expositor of the word, capable of adapting his teachings to the wants of the people. He should be so closely connected with heaven as to become a living channel of light, a mouthpiece for God.

82. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 4, p. 260.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
A pastor should have a correct understanding of the word and also of the human character. Our faith is unpopular. The people are unwilling to be convinced that they are so deeply in error; a great work is to be done, and at present there are but few to do it. One man usually performs the labor which should be shared by two; for the work of the evangelist is necessarily combined with that of the pastor, bringing a double burden upon the worker in the field.

83. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 4, p. 266.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The duties of a pastor are often shamefully neglected because the minister lacks strength to sacrifice his personal inclinations for seclusion and study. The pastor should visit from house to house among his flock, teaching, conversing, and praying with each family, and looking out for the welfare of their souls. Those who have manifested a desire to become acquainted with the principles of our faith should not be neglected, but thoroughly instructed in the truth. No opportunity to do good should be lost by the watchful and zealous minister of God.

84. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 4, p. 266.5 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
People are easily reached through the avenues of the social circle. But many ministers dread the task of visiting; they have not cultivated social qualities, have not acquired that genial spirit that wins its way to the hearts of the people. It is highly important that a pastor should mingle much with his people, that he may become acquainted with the different phases of human nature, readily understand the workings of the mind, adapt his teachings to the intellect of his people, and learn that grand charity possessed only by those who closely study the nature and needs of men.

85. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 4, p. 267.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Those who seclude themselves from the people are in no condition to help them. A skillful physician must understand the nature of various diseases and must have a thorough knowledge of the human structure. He must be prompt in attending to the patients. He knows that delays are dangerous. When his experienced hand is laid upon the pulse of the sufferer, and he carefully notes the peculiar indication of the malady, his previous knowledge enables him to determine concerning the nature of the disease and the treatment necessary to arrest its progress. As the physician deals with physical disease, so does the pastor minister to the sin-sick soul. And his work is as much more important than that of the former as eternal life is more valuable than temporal existence. The pastor meets with an endless variety of temperaments; and it is his duty to become acquainted with the members of families that listen to his teachings, in order to determine what means will best influence them in the right direction.

86. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 4, p. 269.4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The old-fashioned pastor, who traveled on horseback and spent much time in visiting his flock, enjoyed much better health, notwithstanding his hardships and exposures, than our ministers of today, who avoid all physical exertion as far as possible and confine themselves to their books.

87. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 5, p. 302.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
There has been a neglect on the part of the ministers. They have not urged home to the hearts of their hearers the necessity of faithfulness. They have not educated the church on all points of truth and duty nor labored with zeal to bring them into working order and to get them interested in every branch of the cause of God. I have been shown that had the church been properly educated, they would have been far in advance of their present position. The neglect on the part of the ministers has made the people careless and unfaithful. They have not felt their individual responsibility, but have excused themselves on account of the failure of the ministers to do the work of a pastor. But God does not hold them excused. Had they no Bible, had they no warnings, reproofs, and entreaties from heaven to bring duty to their minds, there would be less condemnation. But the Lord has given counsel and instruction; the duty of each individual has been made so plain that he need make no mistake.

88. Testimonies for the Church, vol. 5, p. 528.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The merchant, the carpenter, the farmer, and the lawyer all have to learn their trade or profession. At first, for want of knowledge, they do imperfect work; but as they continue patiently at their vocations they become masters of their several callings. Without close application of mind and heart, and all the powers of the being, the minister will prove a failure. He may be a preacher, but he must also be fitted to act as a pastor. Study must never cease; it must be continued all through the period of his labor, no matter how well qualified for the labor he may think himself to be.

89. Daughters of God, p. 86.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Young Women to Learn to Teach Others—We need unselfish, devoted [people] to act as educators. Young men and young women are to be brought to our schools to receive an education, that they may learn how to teach others to understand the Word of the Lord. We need ministerial laborers in every school to educate the children and youth in Bible lines, and the pastor has work to do for the teachers as well as the students. Our schools must be more like the schools of the prophets. We call upon teachers and all connected with the school to make self-sacrificing efforts. We call upon our sisters to work intelligently, devotedly, interestedly, to make the school a success. Let our churches help. God will bless all who cooperate with Him.—Manuscript Releases 6:400 (1899).

90. Daughters of God, p. 103.4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Visitation Essential Part of Ministry—Elder H used to live here [Adelaide, Australia] and preach to the people, but he was not a shepherd of the flock. He would tell the poor sheep that he would rather be horsewhipped than visit. He neglected personal labor, therefore pastoral work was not done in the church and its borders. The deacons and elders of the church have acted wisely and worked judiciously to keep the church in order, and we find the people in a much better condition than we had expected. We are happily disappointed. But when I look over the years, and think of what might have been done, if the man entrusted with the flock had been a faithful steward of God, watching for souls as one that must give an account, my heart is made sad. Had the preacher done the work of a pastor, a much larger number would now be rejoicing in the truth.—Manuscript Releases 9:343, 344 (1892).

91. The Acts of the Apostles, p. 363.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
A pastor should mingle freely with the people for whom he labors, that by becoming acquainted with them he may know how to adapt his teaching to their needs. When a minister has preached a sermon, his work has but just begun. There is personal work for him to do. He should visit the people in their homes, talking and praying with them in earnestness and humility. There are families who will never be reached by the truths of God's word unless the stewards of His grace enter their homes and point them to the higher way. But the hearts of those who do this work must throb in unison with the heart of Christ.

92. The Acts of the Apostles, p. 393.4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“Wherefore I take you to record this day, that I am pure from the blood of all men. For I have not shunned to declare unto you all the counsel of God.” No fear of giving offense, no desire for friendship or applause, could lead Paul to withhold the words that God had given him for their instruction, warning, or correction. From His servants today God requires fearlessness in preaching the word and in carrying out its precepts. The minister of Christ is not to present to the people only those truths that are the most pleasing, while he withholds others that might cause them pain. He should watch with deep solicitude the development of character. If he sees that any of his flock are cherishing sin he must as a faithful shepherd give them from God's word the instruction that is applicable to their case. Should he permit them in their self-confidence to go on unwarned, he would be held responsible for their souls. The pastor who fulfills his high commission must give his people faithful instruction on every point of the Christian faith, showing them what they must be and do in order to stand perfect in the day of God.

93. The Great Controversy, p. 128.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Luther, though still a papist of the straitest sort, was filled with horror at the blasphemous assumptions of the indulgence mongers. Many of his own congregation had purchased certificates of pardon, and they soon began to come to their pastor, confessing their various sins, and expecting absolution, not because they were penitent and wished to reform, but on the ground of the indulgence. Luther refused them absolution, and warned them that unless they should repent and reform their lives, they must perish in their sins. In great perplexity they repaired to Tetzel with the complaint that their confessor had refused his certificates; and some boldly demanded that their money be returned to them. The friar was filled with rage. He uttered the most terrible curses, caused fires to be lighted in the public squares, and declared that he “had received an order from the pope to burn all heretics who presumed to oppose his most holy indulgences.”—D'Aubigne, b. 3, ch. 4.

94. The Great Controversy, p. 179.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
A strong impetus was given to the reform by the appearance of the plague, or Great Death, which swept over Switzerland in the year 1519. As men were thus brought face to face with the destroyer, many were led to feel how vain and worthless were the pardons which they had so lately purchased; and they longed for a surer foundation for their faith. Zwingli at Zurich was smitten down; he was brought so low that all hope of his recovery was relinquished, and the report was widely circulated that he was dead. In that trying hour his hope and courage were unshaken. He looked in faith to the cross of Calvary, trusting in the all-sufficient propitiation for sin. When he came back from the gates of death, it was to preach the gospel with greater fervor than ever before; and his words exerted an unwonted power. The people welcomed with joy their beloved pastor, returned to them from the brink of the grave. They themselves had come from attending upon the sick and the dying, and they felt, as never before, the value of the gospel.

95. The Great Controversy, p. 182.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The disputation was appointed to be held at Baden; but Zwingli was not present. The Council of Zurich, suspecting the designs of the papists, and warned by the burning piles kindled in the papal cantons for confessors of the gospel, forbade their pastor to expose himself to this peril. At Zurich he was ready to meet all the partisans that Rome might send; but to go to Baden, where the blood of martyrs for the truth had just been shed, was to go to certain death. Oecolampadius and Haller were chosen to represent the Reformers, while the famous Dr. Eck, supported by a host of learned doctors and prelates, was the champion of Rome.

96. The Great Controversy, p. 237.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
In The Netherlands the papal tyranny very early called forth resolute protest. Seven hundred years before Luther's time the Roman pontiff was thus fearlessly impeached by two bishops, who, having been sent on an embassy to Rome, had learned the true character of the “holy see“: God “has made His queen and spouse, the church, a noble and everlasting provision for her family, with a dowry that is neither fading nor corruptible, and given her an eternal crown and scepter; ... all which benefits you like a thief intercept. You set up yourself in the temple of God; instead of a pastor, you are become a wolf to the sheep; ... you would make us believe you are a supreme bishop, but you rather behave like a tyrant.... Whereas you ought to be a servant of servants, as you call yourself, you endeavor to become a lord of lords.... You bring the commands of God into contempt.... The Holy Ghost is the builder of all churches as far as the earth extends.... The city of our God, of which we are the citizens, reaches to all the regions of the heavens; and it is greater than the city, by the holy prophets named Babylon, which pretends to be divine, wins herself to heaven, and brags that her wisdom is immortal; and finally, though without reason, that she never did err, nor ever can.”—Gerard Brandt, History of the Reformation in and About the Low Countries 1:6.

97. The Great Controversy, p. 252.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Baxter, Flavel, Alleine, and other men of talent, education, and deep Christian experience stood up in valiant defense of the faith which was once delivered to the saints. The work accomplished by these men, proscribed and outlawed by the rulers of this world, can never perish. Flavel's Fountain of Life and Method of Grace have taught thousands how to commit the keeping of their souls to Christ. Baxter's Reformed Pastor has proved a blessing to many who desire a revival of the work of God, and his Saints’ Everlasting Rest has done its work in leading souls to the “rest” that remaineth for the people of God.

98. The Great Controversy, p. 291.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
When first constrained to separate from the English Church, the Puritans had joined themselves together by a solemn covenant, as the Lord's free people, “to walk together in all His ways made known or to be made known to them.”—J. Brown, The Pilgrim Fathers, page 74. Here was the true spirit of reform, the vital principle of Protestantism. It was with this purpose that the Pilgrims departed from Holland to find a home in the New World. John Robinson, their pastor, who was providentially prevented from accompanying them, in his farewell address to the exiles said:

99. The Great Controversy, p. 307.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“Dr. Nathanael Whittaker, pastor of the Tabernacle church in Salem, held religious services in the meeting-house, and preached a sermon in which he maintained that the darkness was supernatural. Congregations came together in many other places. The texts for the extemporaneous sermons were invariably those that seemed to indicate that the darkness was consonant with Scriptural prophecy.... The darkness was most dense shortly after eleven o'clock.”—The Essex Antiquarian, April, 1899, vol. 3, No. 4, pp. 53, 54. “In most parts of the country it was so great in the daytime, that the people could not tell the hour by either watch or clock, nor dine, nor manage their domestic business, without the light of candles....

100. The Great Controversy, p. 376.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
At a meeting of the presbytery of Philadelphia, Mr. Barnes, author of a commentary widely used and pastor of one of the leading churches in that city, “stated that he had been in the ministry for twenty years, and never, till the last Communion, had he administered the ordinance without receiving more or less into the church. But now there are no awakenings, no conversions, not much apparent growth in grace in professors, and none come to his study to converse about the salvation of their souls. With the increase of business, and the brightening prospects of commerce and manufacture, there is an increase of worldly-mindedness. Thus it is with all the denominations.”—Congregational Journal, May 23, 1844.

101. The Great Controversy, p. 686.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Page 104. Council of Constance.—A primary source on the Council of Constance is Richendal Ulrich, Das Concilium so zu Constanz gehalten ist worden (Augsburg, 1483, incun.). An interesting, recent study of this text, based on the “Aulendorf Codex,” is in the Spencer Collection of the New York Public Library, published by Karl Kup, Ulrich von Richental's Chronicle of the Council of Constance (New York, 1936). See also H. Finke (ed.), Acta Concilii Constanciensis (1896), vol. 1; Hefele, Conciliengeschichte (9 vols.), vols. 6, 7; L. Mirbt, Quellen zur Geschichte des Papsttums (1934); Milman, Latin Christianity, vol. 7, pp. 426-524; Pastor, The History of the Popes (34 vols.), vol. 1, p. 197ff.

102. From Here to Forever, p. 81.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Luther was filled with horror. Many of his own congregation had purchased certificates of pardon. They soon began to come to their pastor, confessing sins and expecting absolution, not because they were penitent and wished to reform, but on the ground of the indulgence. Luther refused, and warned them that unless they should repent and reform, they must perish in their sins. They repaired to Tetzel with the complaint that their confessor had refused his certificates, and some boldly demanded that their money be returned. Filled with rage, the friar uttered terrible curses, caused fires to be lighted in the public squares, and declared that he “had received an order from the pope to burn all heretics who presumed to oppose his most holy indulgences.” 12 D'Aubigne, bk. 3, ch. 4.

103. From Here to Forever, p. 114.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The disputation was appointed to be held at Baden. But the Council of Zurich, suspecting the designs of the papists and warned by the burning piles kindled in the papal cantons for confessors of the gospel, forbade their pastor to expose himself to this peril. To go to Baden, where the blood of martyrs for the truth had just been shed, was to go to certain death. Oecolampadius and Haller were chosen to represent the Reformers, while the famous Dr. Eck, supported by a host of learned doctors and prelates, was the champion of Rome.

104. From Here to Forever, p. 149.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
In the Netherlands the papal tyranny very early called forth protest. Seven hundred years before Luther, the Roman pontiff was fearlessly impeached by two bishops, who, having been sent on an embassy to Rome, had learned the true character of the “holy see”: “You set up yourself in the temple of God; instead of pastor, you are become a wolf to the sheep. ... Whereas you ought to be a servant of servants, as you call yourself, you endeavor to become a lord of lords. ... You bring the commands of God into contempt.” 1 Gerard Brandt, History of the Reformation in and About the Low Countries, bk. 1, p. 6.

105. From Here to Forever, p. 182.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
When first constrained to separate from the English Church, the Puritans joined themselves by a covenant as the Lord's free people “to walk together in all His ways made known or to be made known to them.” 1 J. Brown, The Pilgrim Fathers, p. 74. Here was the vital principle of Protestantism. With this purpose the Pilgrims departed from Holland to find a home in the New World. John Robinson, their pastor, in his farewell address to the exiles said:

106. From Here to Forever, p. 234.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Mr. Barnes, author of a commentary and pastor of one of the leading churches in Philadelphia, “stated that ... now there are no awakenings, no conversions, not much apparent growth in grace in professors, and none come to his study to converse about the salvation of their souls. ... There is an increase of worldly-mindedness. Thus it is with all the denominations.” 2 Congregational Journal, May 23, 1844.

107. Testimony Treasures, vol. 2, p. 392.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Candidates who have grown to manhood and womanhood should understand their duty better than do the younger ones; but the pastor of the church has a duty to do for these souls. Have they wrong habits and practices? It is the duty of the pastor to have special meeting with them. Give them Bible readings, converse and pray with them, and plainly show the claims of the Lord upon them. Read to them the teaching of the Bible in regard to conversion. Show what is the fruit of conversion, the evidence that they love God. Show that true conversion is a change of heart, of thoughts and purposes. Evil habits are to be given up. The sins of evilspeaking, of jealousy, of disobedience, are to be put away. A warfare must be waged against every evil trait of character. Then the believing one can understandingly take to himself the promise: “Ask, and it shall be given you.” Matthew 7:7.

108. Experiences in Australia, p. 17.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Elder Curtis used to live here and preach to the people, but he was not a shepherd of the flock. He would tell the poor sheep that he would rather be horse-whipped than visit. He neglected personal labor; therefore pastoral work was not done in the church and its borders. The deacons and elders of the church have acted wisely and worked judiciously to keep the church in order; and we find the people in a much better condition than we had expected. We are happily disappointed. But when I look over the years, and think of what might have been done, if the man entrusted with the flock had been a faithful steward of God, watching for souls as one that must give an account, my heart is made sad. Had the preacher done the work of a pastor, a much larger number would now be rejoicing in the truth.

109. Mind, Character, and Personality, vol. 2, p. 763.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The Importance of the Work of the Pastor-Counselor—As the physician deals with physical disease, so does the pastor minister to the sin-sick soul. And his work is as much more important than that of the physician as eternal life is more valuable than temporal existence. The pastor meets with an endless variety of temperaments, and it is his duty to become acquainted with the members of the families that listen to his teachings in order to determine what means will best influence them in the right direction.—Gospel Workers, 388 (1915).

110. Ms 76, 1896, par. 3 (87%)
The son of Bro. _______ has been the idol and pet of the home. He has not been the twig bent in the right direction. But, now, as the seed sown so will be the harvest. Satan will work through the child to spoil his own character and give pain to his indulgent parents. It is a lamentable thing when parents, with the Bible before them, do not obey its directions. Every father and mother should be impressed with a solemn sense of their own responsibilities. The great burden of [the father's] life work should be to daily seek grace from God for guidance to make his course of action toward his children that of a faithful pastor to meet every difficulty with the plain, “Thus saith the Lord.” Seek the Lord at every step to make every year of the children's life pleasant with the Lord, for this trust in your hands, my brother, my sister, is the most solemn responsibility you can possibly bear. You have a sacred, solemn work. The religion of the Bible is to have your Redeemer preside in your home and fit yourselves and your children “for the home of the Lord forever.” You now have sorrow because you see the result of indulgence and severity at times.

111. Lt 309, 1903 (January 1, 1903) (87%)
Pastor Willie C. White,

112. Testimony for the Church. — No. 22, p. 156.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
You have been slow to learn from the past, and shape your future labors in such a manner as to shun the errors of the past. The reason of this has been, like the inebriate, you love the stimulus of these sensational meetings, and you long for them, as the drunkard longs for the glass of liquor, to arouse the flagging energies. These debates which create an excitement are mistaken for a zeal for God and love for the truth. You have been almost destitute of the Spirit of God to work with your efforts. If you had God with you in all your moves, and if you felt the burden for souls, and had the wisdom to skillfully manage these exciting seasons to press souls into the kingdom of Christ, you could see fruits of your labors, and God would be glorified. Your soul should be all aglow with the spirit of the truth you present to others. Then, after you have labored to convict souls of the claims the law of God had upon them, teaching them repentance toward God and faith in Jesus Christ, your work is but just begun. You too frequently excuse yourself from

113. Testimony for the Church. — No. 22, p. 165.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Ministers of Christ should feel it a duty binding upon them, if they receive the hospitalities of their brethren or friends, to leave a blessing with the family by seeking to encourage and strengthen the members of the family. They should not neglect the duties of a pastor as they visit from house to house. They should become familiar with every member of the family, that they may understand the spiritual condition of all, and vary their manner of labor to meet the case of each member of the family. When a minister bearing the solemn message of warning to the world receives the hospitable courtesies of friends and brethren, and neglects the duties of a shepherd of the flock, but is careless in his example and deportment, and engages with the young in trifling conversation, jesting and joking, and relating humorous anecdotes to create a laugh, he is unworthy of being a gospel minister, and needs to be converted before he should be intrusted with the care of the sheep and lambs. Ministers who are neglectful of the duties devolving on a faithful pastor give evidence that they are not sanctified by the truths they present to others, and should not be sustained as laborers in the vineyard of the Lord till they have a high sense of the sacredness of the work of a minister of Jesus Christ.

114. Testimony for the Church. — No. 24, p. 7.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
When the armies of Israel prospered, they took all the glory to themselves. When they were tested and proved by hunger, or warfare, they charged all their hardships to Moses. The power of God which was manifested in a remarkable manner in their deliverance from Egypt, and seen from time to time all through their journeyings, should have inspired them with faith, and forever closed their mouths from one expression of ingratitude. But the least apprehension of want, the least fear of danger from any cause, over-balanced the benefits in their favor, and caused them to overlook the blessings received in their times of greatest danger. The experience they passed through in the matter of worshiping the golden calf, should have made so deep an impression upon their minds as never to be effaced. But, although the marks of God's displeasure were fresh before them in their broken ranks and missing numbers because of their repeated offenses against the angel who was leading them, they did not take these lessons to their hearts, and by faithful obedience redeem their past failure, and again

115. Testimony for the Church. — No. 27, p. 174.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
We are living in a most solemn time. All have a work to do requiring diligence. Especially is this true of the pastor who is to care for and feed the flock of God. The one whose special work is to lead the people into the path of truth, should be an able expositor of the Word, and capable of adapting his teachings to the wants of the people. He should be so closely connected with Heaven as to become a living channel of light, a mouth piece of God.

116. Testimony for the Church. — No. 27, p. 175.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
A pastor should have a correct understanding of the Word and also of the human character. Our faith is unpopular. The people are unwilling to be convinced that they are so deeply in error; a great work is to be done, and at present there are but few to do it. One man usually performs the labor which should be shared by two, for the work of evangelist and pastor are necessarily combined, bringing a double burden upon the worker in the field.

117. Testimony for the Church. — No. 27, p. 184.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The duties of pastor are often shamefully neglected because the minister lacks sufficient strength to sacrifice his personal inclinations for seclusion and study. The pastor should visit from house to house among his flock, teaching, conversing and praying with each family, and looking out for the welfare of their souls. Those who have manifested a desire to become acquainted with the principles of our faith should not be neglected, but thoroughly instructed in the truth. No opportunity to do good should be lost by the watchful and zealous minister of God.

118. Testimony for the Church. — No. 27, p. 184.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
People are easily reached through the avenues of the social circle. But many dread the task of visiting; they have not cultivated the social qualities, have not acquired that genial spirit that wins its way to the hearts of the people. It is highly important that a pastor should mingle much with his people that he may become acquainted with the different phases of human nature, readily understand the workings of the mind, adapt his teachings to the intellect of his people, and learn that grand charity only possessed by those who closely study the nature and needs of men.

119. Testimony for the Church. — No. 27, p. 185.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Those who seclude themselves from the people are in no condition to help them. A skillful physician must understand the nature of various diseases, and must have a thorough knowledge of the human structure. He must be prompt in attending to his patients. He knows that delays are dangerous. When his experienced hand is laid upon the pulse of the sufferer, and he carefully notes the peculiar indication of his malady, his previous knowledge enables him to determine concerning the nature of his disease and the treatment necessary to arrest its progress. As the physician deals with physical disease, so does the pastor minister to the sin-sick soul. And his work is as much more important than the former's as eternal life is more valuable than the temporal existence.

120. Testimony for the Church. — No. 27, p. 185.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The pastor meets with an endless variety of temperaments, and it is his duty to become acquainted with the members of families that listen to his teachings, in order to determine what means will best influence them in the right direction.

121. Testimony for the Church. — No. 27, p. 189.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The old-fashioned pastor who traveled on horseback and spent much time in visiting his flock enjoyed much better health, notwithstanding the hardships and exposures, than our ministers of today who avoid, as far as possible, all physical exertion and confine themselves to their books.

122. Testimony for the Church. — No. 32, p. 58.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
There has been a neglect on the part of the ministers. They have not urged home to the hearts of their hearers the necessity of faithfulness. They have not educated the church on all points of truth and duty, nor labored with zeal to bring them into working order, and to get them interested in every branch of the cause of God. I have been shown that had the church been properly educated, they would have been far in advance of their present position. The neglect on the part of the ministers has made the people careless and unfaithful. They have not felt their individual responsibility, but have excused themselves on account of the failure of the ministers to do the work of a pastor. But God does not hold them excused. Had they no Bible, had they no warnings, reproofs, and entreaties from Heaven to bring duty to their minds, there would be less condemnation. But the Lord has given counsel and instruction; the duty of each individual has been made so plain that he need make no mistake.

123. Testimony for the Church. — No. 33, p. 56.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The merchant, the carpenter, the farmer, and the lawyer, all have to learn their trade or profession. At first, for want of knowledge, they do imperfect work; but as they continue patiently at their vocations, they become masters of their several callings. Without close application of mind and heart, and all the powers of the being, the minister will prove a failure. He may be a preacher, but he must also be fitted to act as a pastor. Study must never cease; it must be continued all through the period of his labor, no matter how well qualified for the labor he may think himself to be.

124. Reflecting Christ, p. 179.4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
In His service there must be seen no carelessness and inattentive work. God will not serve with the sins of men who have not a clear sense of the sacred responsibility involved in accepting a position as pastor of a church. He who fails to be a faithful, discerning shepherd in the home will surely fail of being a faithful shepherd to the flock of God in the church.—Manuscript 42, 1903.

125. The Youth’s Instructor February 15, 1900 paragraph 7 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The Lord does not say to us: If any man lack wisdom, let him go to his pastor or to his neighbor, and pray to him for help. Lay your burden on finite men, as weak as yourself, and seek their wisdom. He says: “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him. But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering. For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea, driven with the wind and tossed. For let not that man think that he shall receive anything of the Lord.”

126. North Pacific Union Gleaner December 18, 1907 paragraph 9 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“Behold, they say unto me, Where is the word of the Lord? let it come now. As for me, I have not hastened from being a pastor to follow thee; neither have I desired the woeful day; thou knowest; that which came out of my lips was right before thee. Be not a terror unto me: thou art my hope in the day of evil. Let them be confounded that persecute me, and let me not be confounded: let them be dismayed, but let not me be dismayed; bring upon them the days of evil, and destroy them with double destruction.”

127. North Pacific Union Gleaner January 29, 1908 paragraph 1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Ministers are in danger of becoming lax in regard to the responsibilities that rest upon them. They need to bear in mind that it takes more than powers of oratory to make a minister an ambassador for Christ. The church and the world look to the pastor for an example in self-denial and cross-bearing and devotion to God. Indolence, fitfulness, irresolution, disqualify him for the position of a minister of God.

128. The Signs of the Times February 24, 1876 paragraph 14 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
I occasionally attended the Christian church, where Elder Brown was pastor. During a conference meeting I was invited to relate my experience, which was considered a marked one, and I felt not only great freedom of expression, but happiness in telling my simple story of the love of Jesus and the joy of being accepted by God. I told of my wonderful deliverance from the bondage of doubt and despair, and the joy that I experienced in the hope of salvation. As I spoke in simple language with subdued heart and tearful eyes, my soul seemed drawn toward Heaven in an ecstasy of thanksgiving. The melting power of the Lord came upon the assembled people. Many were weeping and others praising God.

129. The Signs of the Times September 9, 1880 paragraph 6 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
When the armies of Israel prospered, they took all the glory to themselves. When they were tested and proved by hunger, or warfare, they charged all their hardships to Moses. The power of God which was manifested in a remarkable manner in their deliverance from Egypt, and seen from time to time all through their journeyings, should have inspired them with faith, and forever closed their mouths against one expression of ingratitude. But the least apprehension of want, the least fear of danger from any cause, overbalanced the benefits in their favor, and caused them to overlook the blessings received in their times of greatest danger. The judgments visited upon them for their sin in worshiping the golden calf, should have made so deep an impression upon their minds as never to be effaced. But, although the marks of God's displeasure were fresh before them in their broken ranks and missing numbers because of their repeated offenses against the Angel who was leading them, they did not take these lessons to their hearts, and by faithful obedience redeem their past failure, and again they were overcome by the temptations of Satan. The best efforts of the meekest man upon the earth could not quell their insubordination. The unselfish interest of Moses was rewarded with jealousy, suspicion, and calumny. His humble shepherd's life was far more peaceful and happy than his present position as pastor of that vast congregation of turbulent spirits. Their unreasonable jealousies were more difficult to manage than the fierce wolves of the wilderness. Moses dared not choose his own course and do as best pleased himself. He had left his shepherd's crook at God's express command, and in its place had been given him a rod of power. He dared not lay down this scepter and resign his position, till God should dismiss him.

130. The Signs of the Times October 18, 1883 paragraph 10 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The proceedings of these enthusiasts created no little excitement. The preaching of Luther had aroused the people everywhere to feel the necessity of reform, and now some really honest persons were mislead by the pretensions of the new prophets. Those especially who had a love for the marvelous, united with the fanatical party. But the heresy was promptly met by workers in the cause of the Reformation. The pastor of the church of Zwickan [Zwickau] was a man who exemplified in his own life the truths preached by Luther. He tested all things by the word of God, and therefore was not deceived by these pretenders. He resolutely resisted the delusions which they were seeking to introduce, and his deacons supported him in the work.

131. Australasian Union Conference Record March 1, 1901 paragraph 8 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
At the close of the meeting many pressed forward to take my hand and welcome me back to America. I was very glad to meet them. From Elder J. O. Corliss, who is pastor of the San Francisco Church, we learn that there are many lines of Christian effort being carried forward by our brethren and sisters in San Francisco. These include visiting the sick and destitute, finding homes for orphans, and work for the unemployed; nursing the sick, and teaching the love of Christ from house to house; the distribution of literature; and the conducting of classes for healthful living and the care of the sick. A school for the children is conducted in the basement of the meeting-house. In another part of the city a workingmen's home and medical mission is maintained. On Market Street, near the City Hall, there is a bath establishment, operated as a branch of the St. Helena Sanitarium. In the same locality is a depot of the Health Food Company, where health foods are not only sold, but instruction is given as to reforms in diet.

132. Australasian Union Conference Record January 6, 1908 paragraph 9 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“Behold, they say unto me, Where is the word of the Lord? let it come now. As for me, I have not hastened from being a pastor to follow Thee: neither have I desired the woeful day; Thou knowest: that which came out of my lips was right before Thee. Be not a terror unto me: Thou art my hope in the day of evil. Let them be confounded that persecute me, and let me not be confounded: let them be dismayed, but let not me be dismayed: bring upon them the day of evil, and destroy them with double destruction.”

133. The Health Reformer July 1, 1873 paragraph 11 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“Permit me, by way of illustrating another feature of this question, to lead you into the sitting-room of a respectable and pious lady. She is neatly but plainly attired, and is busy, with the aid of a servant, dusting and cleaning the room. The door-bell rings, and the girl hastens to see who is the visitor. She finds the lady's pastor at the door, and, without ceremony, ushers him into the sitting-room. The lady's face is suffused with blushes, as she confusedly lays aside her dusting-brush and offers her hand to the minister, saying, ‘sir, I am ashamed you should find me thus.’

134. The Health Reformer July 1, 1873 paragraph 12 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“‘Let Christ, when he cometh, find me so doing,’ replies her pastor.

135. The Review and Herald July 24, 1883 paragraph 4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“Some pastors seem to think that they must take the lead, manage and manipulate every department of church work. They must arrange the details for every enterprise. Now, there may be churches in which the pastor must do all this or it will not be attended to at all; but in very many churches there is plenty of lay talent for all these purposes, and if the pastor would interest himself in pushing that element to the front, he would save himself much annoyance and hard work, and at the same time be rendering a service to those he thus interests in the general work of the church.

136. The Review and Herald July 24, 1883 paragraph 5 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“In some respects the pastor occupies a position similar to that of the foreman of a gang of laboring men or the captain of a ship's crew. They are expected to see that men over whom they are set, do the work assigned to them correctly and promptly, and if occasion shall require it, only in case of emergency are they to execute in detail.

137. The Review and Herald October 6, 1885 paragraph 7 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Thursday we took the cars for London. Here we had the pleasure of meeting Eld. W. M. Jones, publisher of the Sabbath Memorial, and pastor of an S. D. Baptist chapel in London, where he has stood for many years in defense of the Bible Sabbath. We appreciated his kindness in accompanying us to the British Museum, and in explaining to us many things of interest. It would have been pleasant and profitable to spend considerable time among these interesting relics, but we were obliged to leave to meet appointments at Southampton.

138. The Review and Herald June 23, 1891 paragraph 11 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Flowery discourses will not be sufficient to feed the soul of the famishing child of God. The following desire will give a voice to the longing of many a heart that is fed on what are called “smart sermons.” An intelligent man remarked, “O that my pastor would give me something besides pretty flowers, and brilliant periods, and intellectual treats! My soul is famishing for the bread of life. I long for something simple and nourishing and scriptural.” Daniel Webster gave utterance to these forcible words: “If clergymen in our day would return to the simplicity of gospel truth, and preach more to individuals and less to the crowd, there would not be so much complaint of the decline of true religion. Many of the ministers of the present day take their text from St. Paul, and preach from the newspapers. When they do so, I prefer to enjoy my own thoughts, rather than listen. I want my pastor to come to me in the Spirit of the gospel, saying, ‘You are mortal. Your probation is brief, your work must be done speedily... You are hastening to the bar of God. The Judge standeth before the door.’”

139. The Review and Herald October 20, 1896 paragraph 3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Many love to preach, but shun the labor that is required to lift souls out of sin. Men are dying all around us, and we have not made any special efforts to address them earnestly, interestedly, affectionately, as Christ would have done had he been on the earth. We are Christ's ambassadors, watchmen unto the house of Israel, to see the dangers that await souls, and give them warning. The pastor is a shepherd of the sheep, guarding them, feeding them, warning them, reproving them, or encouraging them, as the case may require. There is visiting to be done, not to have a pleasant chat, but to do the work required of a watchman. There should be earnest conversation and prayer with these souls. This is the kind of work that gains valuable experience in the upbuilding of Christ's kingdom.

140. Appeal and Suggestions to Conference Officers, p. 14.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“The duties of a pastor are often shamefully neglected because the minister lacks strength to sacrifice his personal inclinations for seclusion and study. The pastor should visit from house to house among his flock, teaching, conversing, and praying with each family, and looking out for the welfare of their souls. Those who have manifested a desire to become acquainted with the principles of our faith should not be neglected, but thoroughly instructed in the truth. No opportunity to do good should be lost by the watchful and zealous minister of God.

141. Appeal and Suggestions to Conference Officers, p. 14.4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“People are easily reached through the avenues of the social circle. But many ministers dread the task of visiting; they have not cultivated social qualities, have not acquired that genial spirit that wins its way to the hearts of the people. It is highly important that a pastor should mingle much with his people, that he may become acquainted with the different phases of human nature, readily understand the workings of the mind, adapt his teachings to the intellect of his people, and learn that grand charity, possessed only by those who closely study the nature and needs of man.

142. Appeal and Suggestions to Conference Officers, p. 15.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
“Those who seclude themselves from the people are in no condition to help them. A skillful physician must understand the nature of various diseases, and must have a thorough knowledge of the human structure. He must be prompt in attending to the patients. He knows that delays are dangerous. When his experienced hand is laid upon the pulse of the sufferer, and he carefully notes the peculiar indication of the malady, his previous knowledge enables him to determine concerning the nature of the disease and the treatment necessary to arrest its progress. As the physician deals with physical disease, so does the pastor minister to the sin-sick soul. And his work is as much more important than that of the former, as eternal life is more valuable than temporal existence. The pastor meets with an endless variety of temperaments; and it is his duty to become acquainted with the members of families that listen to his teachings, in order to determine what means will best influence them in the right direction.”Gospel Workers, 76.

143. Appeal and Suggestions to Conference Officers, p. 17.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
But there have been solemn duties neglected in accepting ministers to labor in word and doctrine who can only preach. They do not watch for souls as they that shall give an account. They sermonize; but the work is left undone which the sheep and lambs need to have done for them. And this half-hearted kind of work has been done all through America, and money paid to men employed, when they should have been dismissed to find work less responsible and care taking. In sending men to foreign fields, let there be great caution used. Those who have been accepted as preachers, and have not been educated to watch for souls as they that must give an account, are not the men to enter new fields as missionaries. If there is any corner of the world where churches can be built up and kept in a prosperous condition by sermonizing, while they neglect personal labor, I have yet to learn of this. Men who are accepted to preach, and not to minister, should not go into foreign countries. Better have one thorough shepherd who will care for the flock as a faithful shepherd should, than to have twenty sermonizers who will excuse themselves, saying, “It is not in my line to visit; I cannot visit the church in their families.” Then let there not be a moment's hesitation in telling them, “We do not propose to accept you and give you credentials. You cannot labor. But educate yourself to do a shepherd's work, to care for the sheep and lambs, and you will not be like Ephraim, ‘a cake unturned.’ You will give full proof of your ministry.” Those who can only preach, are not missionaries, and never can be, until they learn the skill, the watchful, tender compassion of a shepherd. The flock of God have a right to expect to be visited by their pastor, to be instructed, advised, counseled, in their own homes. And if a man fails to do this part of the work, he can not be a

144. Spiritual Advancement the Object of Camp-Meetings, p. 9.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Flowery discourses will not be sufficient to feed the soul of the famishing child of God. The following desire will give a voice to the longing of many a heart that is fed on what are called “smart sermons.” An intelligent man remarked, “O that my pastor would give me something besides pretty flowers, and brilliant periods, and intellectual treats! My soul is famishing for the bread of life. I long for something simple and nourishing and Scriptural.”

145. Spiritual Advancement the Object of Camp-Meetings, p. 9.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Daniel Webster gave utterance to these forcible words: “If clergymen in our day would return to the simplicity of gospel truth, and preach more to individuals and less to the crowd, there would not be so much complaint of the decline of true religion. Many of the ministers of the present day take their text from St. Paul, and preach from the newspapers. When they do so, I prefer to enjoy my own thoughts, rather than listen. I want my pastor to come to me in the spirit of the gospel, saying, ‘You are mortal. Your probation is brief, your work must be done speedily.... You are hastening to the bar of God. The Judge standeth before the door.’ ”

146. Manuscript Releases, vol. 2 [Nos. 97-161], p. 280.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The minister of God must be interested in the children and youth, if he would be a faithful pastor of the flock of God. He should make his discourses plain and simple, using language that will be easy to be understood. He should follow the lessons that have been given by the greatest Teacher the world can ever know, preaching in such a manner that the uneducated and the children may readily comprehend the theme of salvation. Children and youth have been strangely neglected.

147. Manuscript Releases, vol. 2 [Nos. 97-161], p. 322 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
[Material requested by the pastor of the Stanley, Virginia, church for general use and to become a part of the records of the church.—A. L. White.]

148. Manuscript Releases, vol. 9 [Nos. 664-770], p. 343.5 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Elder H used to live here and preach to the people, but he was not a shepherd of the flock. He would tell the poor sheep that he would rather be horse-whipped than visit. He neglected personal labor, therefore pastoral work was not done in the church and its borders. The deacons and elders of the church have acted wisely and worked judiciously to keep the church in order, and we find the people in a much better condition than we had expected. We are happily disappointed. But when I look over the years, and think of what might have been done, if the man entrusted with the flock had been a faithful steward of God, watching for souls as one that must give an account, my heart is made sad. Had the preacher done the work of a pastor, a much larger number would now be rejoicing in the truth.

149. Manuscript Releases, vol. 6 [Nos. 347-418], p. 49.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
He who is engaged in the work of the gospel ministry must be faithful in his family life. It is as essential that as a father he should improve the talents God has given him for the purpose of making the home a symbol of the heavenly family, as that in the work of the ministry, he should make use of his God given powers to win souls for the church. As the priest in the home, and as the ambassador of Christ in the church, he should exemplify in his life the character of Christ. He must be faithful in watching for souls as one that must give an account. In his service there must be seen no carelessness and inattentive work. God will not serve with the sins of men who have not a clear sense of the sacred responsibility involved in accepting a position as pastor of a church. He who fails to be a faithful, discerning shepherd in the home, will surely fail of being a faithful shepherd of the flock of God in the church.—Manuscript 42, 1903, 1, 2. (“The Training of Children,” typed May 4, 1903.)

150. Manuscript Releases, vol. 6 [Nos. 347-418], p. 344.2 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Our conference has closed. My husband has been wonderfully sustained and blessed of the Lord. He has spoken to the people with great power and his words have found a lodgment in hearts. Many have come forward for prayers several times—between seventy-five and one hundred. I have spoken to the people six times with freedom. Souls are embracing the truth. At the Health Institute a German Baptist minister has received the truth. He came to be treated for dropsy. He has been wonderfully helped. His name is Alword. He is a man of great intelligence, pastor of a church not more than eight miles from here. He is a devoted Christian. He will, we think, take all his church with him.

151. Manuscript Releases, vol. 6 [Nos. 347-418], p. 348.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
As there were differences of opinion on the policies which should be followed, the school board sought Ellen White's counsel. She was apprised of the problem in advance and met with the board on January 14, 1904. Considering the understanding of the participants regarding the far-reaching nature of the interview, it is well to identify those present: Iram James—Chairman of the school board; Mrs. White's farm manager. L. M. Bowen—Manager of the St. Helena Sanitarium. C. L. Taylor—Chaplain of the sanitarium and pastor of the church. H. M. Mcdowell- Sanitarium plant manager. Mrs. J. Gotzian—A well-to-do widow deeply interested in forward moves; a close friend of Ellen G. White. Miss Sarah Peck—An assistant to Ellen G. White; now the church school teacher. Brother Dennison—A layman, probably a sanitarium employee.

152. Manuscript Releases, vol. 6 [Nos. 347-418], p. 400.3 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
We need unselfish, devoted men to act as educators. Young men and young women are to be brought to our schools to receive an education, that they may learn how to teach others to understand the word of the Lord. We need ministerial laborers in every school to educate the children and youth in Bible lines, and the pastor has work to do for the teachers as well as the students. Our schools must be more like the schools of the prophets. We call upon teachers and all connected with the school to make self-sacrificing efforts. We call upon our sisters to work intelligently, devotedly, interestedly, to make the school a success. Let our churches help. God will bless all who cooperate with Him.—Letter 192, 1899. (To the Directors of the Sanitarium, November 21, 1899.)

153. Manuscript Releases, vol. 10 [Nos. 771-850], p. 64.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Yesterday afternoon after speaking, I called for a contribution for foreign missions, and nearly one hundred dollars was raised. This will be sent to Pastor [L. R.] Conradi. He is pushing the work in Europe with all his power, and is opening up new fields. He needs money. I have just given those in charge of the work in Europe permission to use one thousand dollars of the royalty of my books for the payment of translations.—Letter 149, 1902, pp. 3, 4. (To G. B. Starr and wife, September 22, 1902.)

154. A Call to Stand Apart, p. 97.4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
So far God has employed me as a dormitory resident assistant, colporteur, youth pastor, and registered nurse. I have continually asked myself, “How can I do this job to make an eternal difference for me or someone else?” Only God knows what work I will do in the future; but through Ellen White I have this career assurance: “Not more surely is the place prepared for us in the heavenly * ACTSA-4

155. Loma Linda Messages, p. 167.6 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
The manager and the pastor have their appointed work to do. The Lord calls upon His servants to attain unto perfection of Christian character in every line of effort. We are to see that our hearts are under the control of the Holy Spirit,—under the control of a power out of and above ourselves. Let every soul take hold of the work earnestly, because he is thoroughly converted; because he discerns the methods and ways of the Lord.

156. Loma Linda Messages, p. 173.4 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
We hear that something is now being done in Boston. We are rejoiced to learn, through a report in a recent “Review” of Elder L. S. Wheeler's work as pastor of the Boston church, and of the work of his faithful co-laborers. We are also pleased to learn that Elder F. C. Gilbert has been laboring in Everett, a suburb. We hope that those in charge of the work in New England will cooperate with the Melrose Sanitarium managers in taking aggressive steps to do the work that should be done in Boston. A hundred workers could be laboring to advantage in different portions of the city, in varied lines of service.

157. Life Sketches Manuscript, p. 45.1 (Ellen G. White) (87%)
Not long after receiving this great blessing, I attended a conference meeting at the Freewill Baptist church, where Elder S.E. Brown was pastor. I was invited to relate my experience, I felt not only great freedom of expression, but happiness, in telling my simple story of the love of Jesus and the joy of being accepted of God. As I spoke in simple language, with subdued heart and tearful eyes, my soul seemed drawn toward heaven in thanksgiving, and the melting power of the Lord came upon the assembled people, many weeping and others praising God. Sinners were invited to arise for prayers, and many responded to the call.

158. Ellen G. White: The Later Elmshaven Years: 1905-1915 (vol. 6), p. 89.4 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Repeatedly in the early months of 1906 she mentioned her intention of getting a clear statement of facts from those who were troubled about the testimonies. “If statements have been made that there are contradictions in the testimonies,” she wrote to Elder E. W. Farnsworth, temporary pastor of the Battle Creek church, “should I not be acquainted with the charges and accusations? Should I not know the reason of their sowing tares of unbelief?”—Letter 84, 1906.

159. Ellen G. White: The Later Elmshaven Years: 1905-1915 (vol. 6), p. 125.7 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
The warnings were noted by Elder Daniells and other leaders of the church, and steps were initiated to guard the control of the Tabernacle. In 1863, years before the procedures the denomination now employs to hold and protect church property were instituted, a corporation had been formed to hold the ownership of the Battle Creek church. The articles called for trustees to be elected by the church at stated intervals. Under normal circumstances this would have been adequate. But things in Battle Creek were far from normal. The Battle Creek church operated without a pastor. The first elder, George Amadon, who for many years was connected with the Review and Herald, selected Sabbath-morning speakers from the many ministers in Battle Creek. In 1906 the young minister sent there to care for the needs of the youth made the selection of speakers.

160. Ellen G. White: The Later Elmshaven Years: 1905-1915 (vol. 6), p. 126.2 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Now, as the crisis deepened and Ellen White was sending warnings concerning the security of the Tabernacle, church leaders, local and general, saw that the time had come to appoint a pastor. The man chosen was a much-trusted young minister, M. N. Campbell. He was 32 years of age and had just been ordained. Elder Daniells told him that the assignment would be no easy job. Daniells had just talked to the trustees of the Tabernacle about safeguarding it, and he told Campbell that the trustees had told him to go on about his business. When Daniells asked Campbell to take the job in Battle Creek, Campbell replied:

161. Ellen G. White: The Later Elmshaven Years: 1905-1915 (vol. 6), p. 126.4 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Upon this expression of his willingness to go, the local conference appointed him as pastor of the Battle Creek church. He moved there in November, 1906. In view of his commission, he was soon on the track of the trustees of the corporation that held the Tabernacle.

162. Ellen G. White: The Later Elmshaven Years: 1905-1915 (vol. 6), p. 127.1 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
It was known that the men in control were very favorable to Dr. Kellogg and Elder Jones. The new pastor made friends with the trustees, meeting with them occasionally at the bank, where one was the cashier. He tried to gain their confidence.

163. Ellen G. White: The Later Elmshaven Years: 1905-1915 (vol. 6), p. 127.3 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
But the agreement did not hold for long. When Campbell arrived home, the telephone rang. The trustees said that if they were to go through with it, A. T. Jones must have the right to take part in the legal meeting. Campbell's reply was a decided No! Jones was not a member of the Battle Creek church, and he was not a man the church had confidence in. Other conditions were proposed that Campbell could not accept, and the trustees declared that the meeting they had agreed to would not be held. To this the young pastor responded, “I'm here to tell you, my brother, that that meeting will be held.”

164. Ellen G. White: The Later Elmshaven Years: 1905-1915 (vol. 6), p. 128.2 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
A little time before the meeting the pastor called a few of the leading brethren together for a season of prayer. “They were all good, faithful men,” Campbell reported, “but I don't know that I ever saw a set of men more scared. Old Brother Amadon, one of the finest Christians that ever lived, moaned, ‘If only Sister White were here, if only Sister White were here.’”— Ibid., 14.

165. Ellen G. White: The Later Elmshaven Years: 1905-1915 (vol. 6), p. 433.2 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
The service was simple, informal, and ideal for the setting. Those participating were mostly ministers who had been long associated with Ellen White in the work of the church in America and overseas: J. N. Loughborough, George B. Starr, and E. W. Farnsworth. The pastor of the church of which she was a member, S. T. Hare, pronounced the benediction.

166. Ellen G. White: The Early Elmshaven Years: 1900-1905 (vol. 5), p. 26.1 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Finally, by early evening, the contents of trunks and suitcases having been properly fumigated and repacked, the party was taken by tugboat to San Francisco. They arrived at eight o'clock and were met by G. A. Irwin, president of the General Conference; C.H. Jones, manager of the Pacific Press; and J. O. Corliss, pastor of the San Francisco church. The traveling party soon dispersed. C. H. Jones, a longtime friend and acquaintance, took Ellen White and some of her helpers to his home in Oakland. Others stayed with friends in San Francisco. W. C. and May White, with the twins and Baby Grace, were entertained by the Corlisses at their home in Fruitvale, an Oakland suburb. That night Elder Irwin sent a telegram to Battle Creek, which carried the good news of the arrival of the party. It was published on the back page of the next issue of the Review It read, “San Francisco, Cal., September 21, 1900.—Sister White and party arrived this morning in good condition.” The editor commented that this would be “good news to thousands.” And it was.

167. Ellen G. White: The Early Elmshaven Years: 1900-1905 (vol. 5), p. 56.2 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
The trip began Thursday afternoon, March 7, with Iram James driving the party to the Southern Pacific Railroad station in St. Helena. The southbound, three-car steam train left at 3:17 P.M. to connect at Port Costa with the Owl on its nightly run from Oakland to Los Angeles. In the party were Ellen White, Sara McEnterfer, Maggie Hare, and William White. When the party boarded the Owl at six-seventeen, they were happy to find Elder McClure, pastor of the Healdsburg church, on the train. In his pocket he had the tickets for the journey, which he had secured from C. H. Jones in Oakland. He also had health certificates to prevent quarantine restrictions upon entering Texas on their eastern journey.

168. Ellen G. White: The Early Elmshaven Years: 1900-1905 (vol. 5), p. 191.1 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
A council meeting was held at Elmshaven at 6:00 A.M. Sunday, October 19, 1902. Elder A. G. Daniells, the leader of the church, and Elder E. R. Palmer, who led out in the publishing work at the General Conference, were present. W. T. Knox, president of the Pacific Union Conference; A. T. Jones, president of the California Conference; J. O. Corliss, pastor of the San Francisco church; and Ellen G. White and W. C. White made up the committee of seven. Clarence C. Crisler was called in to make a stenographic report of the discussion. The problem under study: the increasing burden of debt being incurred by the denomination, with particular attention being given to the Battle Creek Sanitarium, which was being rebuilt, and to the Nashville publishing house. As they were discussing the building of the Battle Creek Sanitarium, Ellen White opened her remarks with these words as recorded in the stenographic report of the interview: “I hope you will not incur large debts.”—Manuscript 123, 1902.

169. Ellen G. White: The Early Elmshaven Years: 1900-1905 (vol. 5), p. 273.3 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Soon another letter came to the General Conference officers, from Elder J. S. Washburn, pastor in Washington, D.C., about locating there. Ellen White in one of her letters indicated that it would be advantageous for the Review and Herald to bear the imprint of Washington, D.C. But thus far she still had no definite light (Letter 115, 1903).

170. Ellen G. White: The Early Elmshaven Years: 1900-1905 (vol. 5), p. 313.5 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Iram James was in the chair. The other members were L. M. Bowen, business manager of the St. Helena Sanitarium; Elder C. L. Taylor, Sanitarium chaplain and pastor of the church; H. M. McDowell, Sanitarium steward and purchasing agent; Mrs. J. Gotzian, a lay sister of some means residing in the community; Miss Sarah Peck, now one of the church school teachers; and Brother Dennison, a layman employed in the community.

171. Ellen G. White: The Early Elmshaven Years: 1900-1905 (vol. 5), p. 375.2 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
In spite of the fact that men were painting here also, Ellen White decided to stay over the weekend. On Monday, December 5, she went over to Redlands, some sixty-five miles to the east. Elder E. S. Ballenger, pastor of the new church that had been raised there as the result of an evangelistic effort, had invited Ellen White to come. She stayed in the Ballenger home for a few days and there completed some Review and Herald articles.

172. Ellen G. White in Europe 1885-1887, p. 44.2 (D. A. Delafield) (87%)
Arriving in London about noon, August 27, Ellen White took a brief walk in London, but soon had to retire to her hotel. The next day, Friday, she and her companions met W. M. Jones, pastor of the Seventh Day Baptist church in London and editor of the Sabbath Memorial. Jones led the White party on a two-hour tour of the famous British Museum. Of the visit she observed: “We could not have viewed much without the guidance and information given us from Elder Jones.”—Manuscript 16a, 1885.

173. Ellen G. White in Europe 1885-1887, p. 109.6 (D. A. Delafield) (87%)
At midnight on Thursday, October 22, they boarded the train for Grythyttehed. This town, about 150 miles northwest of Stockholm, was the site of the oldest Seventh-day Adventist church in Sweden. J. P. Rosquist came to this place in April, 1880, after some interest had been aroused by Adventist literature. By August he was able to organize a church of 47 members. Fierce opposition by the pastor of the State church resulted in the arrest of Rosquist and his imprisonment in Orebro.

174. Ellen G. White in Europe 1885-1887, p. 253.1 (D. A. Delafield) (87%)
That afternoon Mrs. White was scheduled to speak in the large Baptist church in Tramelan. A notice was sent to the pastor of the church, but he refused to read it to his congregation, thinking she would dwell on the Sabbath question. Nevertheless, there were nearly 300 waiting to hear her when she arrived at the church. Her sermon was on genuine faith. She was naturally interested in the responses of the people, and as they filed out, many of them greeted her with expressions like: “I shall take home that which I have heard; I see nothing objectionable in it.”

175. Ellen G. White in Europe 1885-1887, p. 308.4 (D. A. Delafield) (87%)
Mrs. White had arrived in Kettering on Wednesday evening, June 29, and stayed at the J. H. Durland home on Hawthorne Road. The next day she was joined by her son, W. C. White. Besides the two Sabbath talks, she spoke to the church once on Sunday in a hall the pastor had rented for church gatherings.

176. Ellen G. White in Europe 1885-1887, p. 314.3 (D. A. Delafield) (87%)
At the home of Brother Drew in Liverpool, Sister White enjoyed some last pleasant hours. There she met a clerical brother who had recently accepted the Sabbath, a Pastor Smith. “He has been a minister of the State Church and was separated from the church because of his receiving the doctrine of immortality of the soul only through Christ, in accordance with the Word of God.”—Ibid. She rejoiced to see this honest Christian advance in the light and she did her best to encourage him.

177. Ellen G. White: The Progressive Years: 1862-1876 (vol. 2), p. 9.2 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
A journal, the Review and Herald, was serving as the organ of communication and, in a sense, as a pastor throughout the ranks of the Sabbathkeeping Adventists. A publishing house in Michigan was in operation, supplying literature for the church and its outreach. The time had come for notable advances.

178. Ellen G. White: The Progressive Years: 1862-1876 (vol. 2), p. 368.2 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Thursday was their last day in Woodland, a day Ellen White spent in visiting people interested in the message, praying with them, and encouraging them to take their stand. In the evening she spoke, closing her work with an altar call. “Quite a large number came forward,” she noted in her diary, “and we united in prayer for them.”—Manuscript 5, 1872. The meeting lasted until half past ten. Friday morning, November 1, they were up at four, preparing to take an early train to San Francisco. They arrived in the city at noon. Loughborough and Cornell closed up the tent meeting the next Tuesday evening, and the tent was moved to San Francisco on Wednesday. Cornell was left in Woodland to pastor the flock and to lead out in the construction of a house of worship.

179. Ellen G. White: The Progressive Years: 1862-1876 (vol. 2), p. 401.1 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
When James and Ellen White left Battle Creek for California on December 18, 1873, he was president of the Publishing Association, editor of the Review and Herald, and nominally pastor of the Battle Creek church—and in his heart inseparably linked with the institutions there. He had a very special interest in the developing denominational school that was meeting temporarily in rooms in the newly constructed Review and Herald third building. He was able to sit in with just one class of the new term before leaving the city. Uriah Smith had been restored to the editorial staff of the Review and actually was managing the paper.

180. Ellen G. White: The Lonely Years: 1876-1891 (vol. 3), p. 12.2 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
There our first college, our Health Institute, and our main printing house are located. There is a church of more than two hundred members who regard us as their pastor, though we are from them six months at a time, and are with them only a few Sabbaths in a year. We can never have as much interest at any other point as at Battle Creek.—The Signs of the Times, November 11, 1875.

181. Ellen G. White: The Lonely Years: 1876-1891 (vol. 3), p. 132.3 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
James White remained in the East to care for the many administrative duties he willingly accepted at the General Conference session, to pastor the Battle Creek church, and to push ahead with such publishing interests as the issuance of Life Sketches of James and Ellen White and the republication of some of the earliest E. G. White pamphlets and books. As time and strength permitted, he would continue to visit churches in Michigan in the interests of spiritual revival.

182. Ellen G. White: The Lonely Years: 1876-1891 (vol. 3), p. 188.7 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
The college did not have dormitories. Students boarded with families in the community or on their own. This exacerbated problems of discipline. Hosts, naturally inclined to sympathize with and to accredit the reports of the respective students who boarded with them, took sides on school-related issues. This brought divisions in the Battle Creek church, itself a church without a pastor.

183. Ellen G. White: The Lonely Years: 1876-1891 (vol. 3), p. 360.5 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
She had promised in her dedicatory address that she would come back for more visits to the little church in Tramelan. She fulfilled this promise early in February. She filled appointments Sabbath, February 5, in the church. On Sunday afternoon, by special invitation of the pastor, she spoke again in the national Baptist church, giving a temperance address. Introduced by the pastor, she counted the meeting a success (The Review and Herald, April 5, 1887).

184. Ellen G. White: The Lonely Years: 1876-1891 (vol. 3), p. 469.6 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
In Washington she was entertained in the home of J. S. Washburn, pastor of the Washington church. One day in conversation, thinking of the Minneapolis session and the discussions on righteousness by faith, Washburn asked Ellen White,“What is faith?” Her reply was prompt and simple: “You believe what your father tells you, do you not? That is faith.”—As related by J. S. Washburn to the author. To Ellen White, faith was a simple, uncomplicated experience—just trusting belief as a child would trust a father.

185. Ellen G. White: The Early Years: 1827-1862 (vol. 1), p. 35.5 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
The work Miller started in Portland in the thirteen days he spent there continued after his departure. Lorenzo D. Fleming, pastor of the local Christian Connection, reported to Miller soon after the meetings closed:

186. Ellen G. White: The Early Years: 1827-1862 (vol. 1), p. 489.3 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
A few days later the pastor of the bloomfield street church in boston called upon foy to relate the visions in his house of worship. Reluctantly he consented, and the next evening he found a large congregation assembled awaiting his message. As he began to speak, his fear left him, and he related with great freedom the things that were shown to him, to a congregation that gave rapt attention.

187. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 12.4 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
At its 1884 session the General Conference took an action to send Haskell to lead out in opening up the work of Seventh-day Adventists in Australia. Being a practical man, he chose four families to help him start the work in the southern continent: J. O. Corliss, evangelist and editor; M. C. Israel, pastor and evangelist; William Arnold, a colporteur; and Henry Scott, a printer. The five families traveled to Australia in 1885, arriving in June, the winter season in Australia. They threw themselves wholeheartedly into the work; through two evangelistic efforts, supplemented by book distribution, there soon was a church of ninety members in Melbourne and a fledgling monthly magazine, The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times.

188. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 46.4 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
The Adelaide church, with a membership of more than one hundred, was second in size only to the Melbourne church. Early in the plans for Australia, Ellen White was to visit Adelaide. The pastor, W. D. Curtis, now returned to the homeland, had engaged in preaching, but neglected personal visiting, and the church was suffering. Just as soon as living quarters could be found, Ellen White was determined to take her helpers with her to join Daniells in his revival meetings and spend two or three months there. Daniells at last found a neat little furnished cottage of six rooms that would cost Ellen White only $25 a month, and sent for her. The group made the trip overnight and settled in on Monday, September 26.

189. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 47.2 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
The church generously furnished a horse and carriage, Ellen White paying for the care of the horse. She divided her working time between preaching, visiting the church members, and writing. Some of the visiting, because of the neglect of the pastor, was very taxing. Gradually her health improved, and on October 5 she reported that she felt more natural than she had felt during her sickness (Letter 72, 1892). And the time came when on three consecutive mornings she could write:

190. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 70.5 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
For the Seventh-day Adventist pastor, Robert Hare, she had words of counsel and instruction that she arranged to read to him and his wife. After listening for a time, with a troubled look he declared that he might as well give up preaching. Ellen White tells the story:

191. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 86.1 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Another letter was from Leroy Nicola, a prominent pastor in Iowa. It was the Nicola letter that brought her special rejoicing. It was a confession, “a most thorough confession of the part he acted in Minneapolis.” Of this Ellen White wrote: “It is thorough, and I praise the Lord for the victory he has gained over the enemy who has held him four years from coming into the light. Oh, how hard it is to cure rebellion! How strong the deceiving power of Satan!”—Manuscript 80, 1893.

192. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 230.3 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Pastor J. O. Corliss, one of the first to introduce the views and work of the denomination in the colonies, will take a prominent part in the evening discourses on the prophecies of the Bible and the signs of the times.—September 23, 1895.

193. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 245.5 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Fannie planned to return to the United States, but was prevented from doing so by a rather prolonged illness. She stayed for a while at the home of Pastor Stephen McCullagh in Melbourne, and then decided to visit Cooranbong. In response to a telegram from her, Ellen White arranged to have her met at nine o'clock at night at the Morisset railway station and taken to the Shannon home. There, under the tender and discerning care of Sara McEnterfer, who gave her hydrotherapy treatments, Fannie's health began to improve. A whole year had passed since the Melbourne experience.

194. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 283.5 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Both Haskell and Starr gave frequent reports to Ellen White of the progress in their attempts to reclaim the men who were departing from the church. They labored hard with the two couples, but without success. Most of the members of the Adelaide church were soon standing firm, however. The hall meetings of McCullagh and Hawkins collapsed. Both men, with their wives, gave up the Sabbath. Hawkins found a position as pastor of a Baptist church in the little town of Mannum about forty miles east of Adelaide.

195. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 296.3 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Just when they were within three weeks of target date for the school to open, Haskell was suddenly called to Adelaide to assist in meeting the crisis in the church there, brought about by the apostasy of the pastor, Stephen McCullagh. With Haskell's leaving, even if for only a couple of weeks, Hare's courage sank to an all-time low. He could see there was no hope of meeting the April 28 deadline for the opening of school. Taking in the situation, Ellen White began to plan a strategy, for she held that the school must open on time. She was not able to attend church on the Sabbath, but she sent an announcement to be read appointing a meeting for all who would, to attend on Sunday morning at six o'clock. She had something to say to them. She sent word to Metcalfe Hare to come to her home after the Sabbath to meet with Mrs. Haskell, Sara, and herself.

196. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 303.4 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
Pastor S. N. Haskell is the principal instructor in Bible study; and Mrs. Hettie Hurd Haskell, his wife, has charge of one Bible class, and acts as the matron of the school.

197. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 322.3 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
In conclusion, it should be stated that the erection of this building at this early stage of the school enterprise is mainly due to the faith and energy of Pastor S. N. Haskell and Mrs. E. G. White, and the rich blessings of God on their efforts. But for them, the building would perhaps not have been built for some time yet. With but £100 in sight, they moved out by faith and began to build, and the results are as already stated.

198. Ellen White: Woman of Vision, p. 182.3 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
There our first college, our Health Institute, and our main printing house are located. There is a church of more than two hundred members who regard us as their pastor, though we are from them six months at a time, and are with them only a few Sabbaths in a year. We can never have as much interest at any other point as at Battle Creek (Ibid., November 11, 1875).

199. Ellen White: Woman of Vision, p. 198.3 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
James remained in the East to care for the many administrative duties he had willingly accepted at the General Conference session, to pastor the church and to push ahead with such publishing interests as the issuance of Life Sketches of James and Ellen White.

200. Ellen White: Woman of Vision, p. 274.2 (Arthur L. White) (87%)
At its 1884 session the General Conference took an action to send Haskell to Australia. Being a practical man, he chose four families to help him start the work: J. O. Corliss, evangelist and editor; M. C. Israel, pastor and evangelist; William Arnold, a colporteur; and Henry Scott, a printer. The five families traveled to Australia in 1885, arriving in June, the winter season in Australia. They threw themselves wholeheartedly into the work. Through two evangelistic efforts, supplemented by book distribution, there soon was a church of 90 members in Melbourne and a fledgling monthly magazine, The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times.

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