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    III

    Mr. Gamble will have it, that the Sabbath which, by his slipping and sliding and other hocus-pocus, he has made for the Jews to observe between the deliverance from Egypt and the crucifixion, was solely in commemoration of their deliverance from Egypt, and had no connection with the creation Sabbath. And for his basis in this he resorts to another entangling invention. That is, he invents what he calls three decalogues: one for the Patriarchal Dispensation, another for the Jewish, and a third for the Christian.STSG 30.1

    The Decalogue of Exodus 20, he says, is the “Patriarchal Decalogue;” that in its fourth commandment God “revealed the creation Sabbath,” and that it “was of universal application.” He claims that this Decalogue was never written on the tables of stone.STSG 31.1

    What he calls “the Jewish Decalogue” is taken from Deuteronomy 5:7-21. And he makes this “Jewish Decalogue,” with its Sabbath, commemorative of the deliverance from Egypt; because it does not read word for word as does the Decalogue in Exodus 20; and because, in repeating the fourth commandment, Moses said: “And remember that thou wast a servant in the land of Egypt, and that the Lord thy God brought thee out thence through a mighty hand and by a stretched-out arm; therefore the Lord thy God commanded thee to keep the Sabbath day.”STSG 31.2

    Of what he calls the “Patriarchal Decalogue,” he says, “The Sabbath commemorated God’s rest from creation to the Patriarch, and occurred regularly on the seventh day.” P. 205.STSG 31.3

    Of what he calls the “Jewish Decalogue,” he says: “To the Jew, the Sabbath commemorated his deliverance from Egyptian slavery, on Abib 15, that date being the high Sabbath every year thereafter.” P. 205.STSG 31.4

    But this invention of separate decalogues is all a hocus-pocus, as really, though not so abundantly, as is his invention of the fixed-date Sabbaths. For, in order to have what he calls the “Jewish Decalogue” to refer to the deliverance from Egypt as an incentive to Sabbath-keeping, and so to be different from what he calls the “Patriarchal Decalogue,” he begins to quote what he calls the “Patriarchal Decalogue,” not where the words of God begin in His speaking it, but where, for the purpose which he has in mind, Mr. Gamble chooses to begin it.STSG 31.5

    God’s own words, in His own speaking at Sinai the original and only true Decalogue that there is or ever was, began, and ever rightly do begin, with the reference to the deliverance from Egypt. Here are the divine words, and the inspired record as to that: “And God spake all these words:—STSG 32.1

    “I AM “the Lord thy God,STSG 32.2

    “which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.STSG 32.3

    “Thou shalt have no other gods before Me,” etc., etc., etc.STSG 32.4

    Now all these words of God referring to the deliverance from Egypt and its bondage, are left out by Mr. Gamble: he beginning his patriarchal decalogue merely with the words, “Thou shalt have no other gods before Me:” thus causing God to leave a dead blank as to who He is that gives this law. It is true that Mr. Gamble and the Methodist Church are not the only people who thus mutilate, or even decapitate, God’s law; but that is no fair excuse for such a thing.STSG 32.5

    Then, in quoting Deuteronomy 5:7-21, where Moses, in manifestly directing attention to this original and only true Decalogue, refers to the deliverance from Egypt, this is seized upon, by Mr. Gamble, and because of it he erects Deuteronomy 5:17-21 into an altogether distinct and distinctly given decalogue, which he will have to pertain only to the Jews. But, as we have seen, this is accomplished by a positive omission of the words of the Lord Himself in speaking from Sinai His law, as in Exodus 20.STSG 32.6

    To any truly inquiring mind, it is perfectly plain that the Decalogue as quoted in Deuteronomy 5:17-21 is nothing else than a rehearsal of the original Decalogue in Exodus 20, by Moses in the regular course of his reminding the people of Israel of their experiences through the forty years, from the deliverance from Egypt to the border of Jordan where then he and they stood; and that it is rehearsed with direct reference to the original Decalogue in Exodus 20. This is plain from the fact that when Moses comes to the fourth commandment, he does not attempt to repeat it, as with the preceding ones; but begins thus: “Keep the Sabbath day, to sanctify it, as the Lord thy God hath commanded thee.” Beyond all question, that is a direct reference to the fourth commandment, as spoken from Sinai; and shows that he refers the people to that commandment for the authority, and for the commandment itself, as to the keeping of the Sabbath.STSG 33.1

    Again, when Moses comes to the fifth commandment, he says: “Honor thy father and thy mother, as the Lord thy God hath commanded thee,” etc. This is again, beyond all question, a direct reference to the Decalogue as in Exodus 20, as the original.STSG 33.2

    And these two positive references to the Decalogue as in Exodus 20, show that it is to that Decalogue that Moses turns the attention of the people as the original; as the one to which they are to look; which they are to study; and as that which they are to obey.STSG 34.1

    The reference to their being delivered from Egypt is of the same character precisely, for it was the word of the Lord from heaven, which He Himself spoke at Sinai, saying,—STSG 34.2

    “I AM “the Lord thy God, “which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.STSG 34.3

    “Thou shalt have no other gods before Me,” etc.STSG 34.4

    “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy.... The seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God.”STSG 34.5

    It was this word spoken by the Lord Himself concerning their deliverance from Egypt, that was the original and the basis of Moses’s reference to this fact forty years afterwards, on the borders of Canaan, in his rehearsing and emphasizing God’s dealings with them from the day that they left Egypt. Therefore on Mr. Gamble’s own ground, when place is truly allowed to the words which God truly spoke at Sinai, the Sabbath of Deuteronomy 5:12-15 can no more be applied or confined exclusively to the Jews, than can the Sabbath of the Decalogue of Exodus 20, which he himself says is identical with the creation Sabbath, that it was given to Adam, that it “required the Sabbath to be on a fixed seventh day,” and “on a fixed day of the week,” and that it “was of universal application.”STSG 34.6

    This scheme is also in itself, and in Mr. Gamble’s plan, as capricious as is that of his sliding and hocus-pocus “fixed Sabbaths.” For as we have seen, he states repeatedly and explicitly, that the calendar which enables him to accomplish all this “wonderful discovery” is built distinctly “out of the old Egyptian calendar.” Why, then, should he be so willingly dependent upon Egypt for all that makes him great, and then not only repudiate the Sabbath of the Lord, which falls on Saturday, because in connection with its observance, deliverance from Egypt is mentioned, but also must take from the mouth of the Lord and from the Decalogue, which he proves is Adamic and patriarchal and of universal application, the reference which is by the Lord there made to deliverance from Egypt, not only as an incentive to the observance of the Sabbath, but of the whole Decalogue as well?STSG 35.1

    A thing which is Egyptian altogether is good enough for Mr. Gamble to pick up, and spend eighteen years upon, in warping it around to be accepted by all Christendom; when an institution of the Lord must be utterly rejected by all Christendom, merely because, in calling people to its observance, the Lord Himself cites as an incentive the fact that He has delivered them from Egypt and its bondage.STSG 35.2

    It can not be questioned that this very forcibly illustrates the difference between God and Mr. Gamble, God, in asking men to accept His will and His way, does it upon the basis of the total exclusion of all Egyptian elements.STSG 35.3

    “I AM “the Lord thy God, “which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.”STSG 36.1

    Mr. Gamble, on the other hand, in asking mankind to accept his will and his way, does it upon the repeated assurance that it is based altogether upon Egyptian elements, for he says that it is done by warping the Bible into the Egyptian calendar: or as he himself puts it, “remodeling the Egyptian calendar into the Bible calendar.” “It is built out of the old Egyptian calendar.”STSG 36.2

    And this difference is fundamental, because of Mr. Gamble’s failure to discern a beautiful and vital view of the gospel. In this thought of the Lord’s as to the deliverance from Egypt, there is one of the profoundest and mightiest of spiritual truths. As we have seen, the very first words spoken by the Lord in the giving of His law were and are:—STSG 36.3

    “I AM “the Lord thy God, “which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.”STSG 36.4

    This law of ten commandments which, preface and all, was spoken by the Lord at Sinai, is perfect. When He had spoken it, all was said that can be said, and “He added no more.” Deuteronomy 5:22; Ecclesiastes 12, 13, margin. This law, preface and all, is “holy, and just, and good.” Romans 7:12.STSG 36.5

    God is Spirit. And this law, preface and all, being altogether of God, is therefore altogether spiritual; “for the law is spiritual.” Romans 7:14. Accordingly, the Egypt referred to is spiritual Egypt; and the bondage referred to is spiritual bondage; for the Scriptures deal definitely with a spiritual Egypt. Revelation 11:8.STSG 37.1

    Spiritually, then, what is Egypt? Read this: “By faith Moses, when he was come to years, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter; choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season; esteeming the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures in Egypt.” Hebrews 11:24-26.STSG 37.2

    Here we have “affliction with the people of God,” set over against “the pleasures of sin;” and “the reproach of Christ” set over against “the treasures in Egypt;” thus:—STSG 37.3

    Affliction with the people of God.STSG 37.4

    Reproach of Christ.STSG 37.5

    Pleasures of sin.STSG 37.6

    Treasures in Egypt.STSG 37.7

    This shows “affliction with the people of God,” and “the reproach of Christ,” to be synonymous; and “the pleasures of sin,” and “the treasures in Egypt,” to be likewise synonymous. It also plainly shows “sin” and “Egypt” to be synonymous. Spiritual Egypt, therefore, is the realm of sin. Therefore this beginning of the law of God as spoken by the Lord from heaven, simply says, I am the Lord thy God, which have brought thee out of the realm and bondage of sin.STSG 37.8

    Brother Gamble claims that he and other Christians are not to observe this law; but the only basis which that claim can have is that he and other Christians have not been brought out of Egypt. But not to have been brought out of Egypt is to be yet in the realm and bondage of sin. And not being delivered from the realm and bondage of sin, being still in Egypt, they can not observe this law; for it is only those who have been brought out of Egypt, those who have been completely delivered from the realm and bondage of sin, that can keep this holy, just, good, and spiritual law.STSG 37.9

    Now all this is not mere argument, for effect or advantage; it is perfect truth; for when Israel was yet in Egypt, the word came to Pharaoh, “Thus saith the Lord, Israel is My son, even My first-born: and I say unto thee, Let My son go, that he may serve Me” To serve the Lord is to do His will, it is to keep His law. Exodus 16:4. Israel had to be delivered from Egypt before they could serve the Lord, before they could keep His law. They must be delivered that they might serve Him, that they might keep His law. And when He had delivered them He said:—STSG 38.1

    “I AM “the Lord thy God, “which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.STSG 38.2

    “Thou shalt have no other gods before Me....STSG 38.3

    “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy.... The seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God,” etc., etc.STSG 38.4

    And in this, from that day till this one, the Lord has been doing His very best to have all people learn that it is impossible for anybody to observe His law, impossible for anybody to serve Him, who has not been delivered from the realm and bondage of sin.STSG 38.5

    But some may ask, Was there anything by which Israel then could know that this was spiritual Egypt?—There was, decidedly. Consider:—STSG 39.1

    God promised Abram that his seed should be as the stars of heaven. Through unbelief, the promise was not fulfilled as soon as they expected, and Sarai said to Abram, “The Lord hath restrained me from bearing;” the promise has not been fulfilled; here is my Egyptian maid; take her, and peradventure the Lord will give us seed by her. That was done, and Ishmael was born. But the Lord said to Abraham that Sarah should have a child indeed, should bear a son, and they should call his name Isaac. And Abraham said in response to that, “O that Ishmael might live before Thee!” Genesis 16:1-3; 17:15-18.STSG 39.2

    That Egyptian maid was a bondwoman; and her son was a bondson, a bond-servant, born of the flesh, a child of unbelief, a man of violence, “his hand against every man.” When Abraham said, “O that Ishmael might live before Thee!” he was praying that Ishmael might be counted by God as the promised seed through whom deliverance and freedom should come to the sons of men and all the children of God. But could freedom come to any person through a bondman? Abram himself must be redeemed by the promised seed, “which is Christ.” If now this son, being a bondson, should be accepted as the promised seed, Abraham could himself never be redeemed, but instead he and all mankind would forever remain in bondage. And what bondage?—Ishmael’s mother was an Egyptian and a bondwoman; and Ishmael being a bondson, his was Egyptian bondage. All this is an allegory, and shows that there was Egyptian bondage-a spiritual Egypt-in the family of Abraham.STSG 39.3

    Turn to Galatians, and see plainly that the Lord says the same. Galatians 4:22-24: “For it is written, that Abraham had two sons, the one by a bondmaid, the other by a free woman. But he who was of the bondwoman was born after the flesh; but he of the free woman was by promise. Which things are an allegory: for these are the two covenants; the one from the Mount Sinai, which gendereth to bondage, which is Agar.”STSG 40.1

    By this we are pointed right back to the family of Abraham; and to Hagar, the Egyptian. That covenant, says the Scripture, “Gendereth to bondage, which is Hagar.” Hagar, in the family of Abraham, represents, in the allegory, the covenant from Sinai. That covenant gendered to bondage. Hagar was an Egyptian. Then what bondage is represented in the covenant at Sinai?—Egyptian bondage. But it was spiritual bondage. Therefore there was then a spiritual Egypt.STSG 40.2

    Read further: “For this Agar is Mount Sinai in Arabia, and answereth to Jerusalem which now is, and is in bondage with her children. But Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all.” Verses 25, 26.STSG 40.3

    So when Abraham said, “O that Ishmael might live before Thee!” he asked that a bond-servant should be accepted as the one through whom the promised Seed should come, which is Christ. Thus, unknowingly, he asked that God, and all mankind, should go into bondage in spiritual Egypt. Egypt is the symbol of darkness, and also the symbol of sin, as we have seen. Sin also is darkness itself. Egypt, then, representing sin and darkness, it is plain that sin with its darkness is spiritual Egypt.STSG 41.1

    The Lord could never accept a bond-servant as the promised seed. So the Lord answered Abraham with these words: “Sarah thy wife shall bear thee a son indeed; and thou shalt call his name Isaac: and I will establish My covenant with him for an everlasting covenant, and with his seed after him. And as for Ishmael, I have heard thee: Behold, I have blessed him, and will make him fruitful, and will multiply him exceedingly; twelve princes shall he beget, and I will make him a great nation. BUT My covenant will I establish WITH ISAAC, which Sarah shall bear unto thee at this set time in the next year.”STSG 41.2

    Isaac was the promised seeed. But think! Isaac never was IN EGYPT. Remember that. There was a famine in Canaan, and he started to go to Egypt, but the Lord said to him, “Go not down into Egypt.” Genesis 26:2. Abraham was in Egypt; Sarah was in Egypt; Israel was in Egypt; but Isaac never was in Egypt. He was the child of promise, born of the Spirit from the beginning.STSG 41.3

    Further: “For this Agar is Mount Sinai in Arabia, and answereth to Jerusalem which now is, and is in bondage with her children. But Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all. For it is written, Rejoice, thou barren that barest not; break forth and cry, thou that travailest not: for the desolate hath many more children than she which hath an husband. Now WE, brethren, as Isaac was, are the children of promise.”STSG 41.4

    And who are WE?—“If ye be Christ’s, then are ye Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise.” Isaac was the child of Abraham,—the child of the promise. And when WE become Abraham’s seed by faith in Christ, delivered from the bondage of sin,—from spiritual Egypt,—we are “as Isaac was,” born of the Spirit, free from Egypt.STSG 42.1

    Thus Egyptian bondage and Christian freedom were in the family of Abraham. Ishmael was born after the flesh, and represented Egyptian bondage. Isaac was born after the Spirit, and represented the children of God by faith of Jesus Christ. And by this, Israel, at Sinai and always, should have remembered that the Egypt of God’s law is spiritual Egypt, and that the outward, physical, Egypt of bondage and darkness was but an object-lesson of the inner, spiritual Egypt of the darkness and bondage of sin.STSG 42.2

    Israel of old was called God’s son, even his first-born, and God called him out of Egypt. And when God’s Son indeed, His first-born, His only-begotten Son, came into this world to deliver all from the realm and bondage of sin; when He came to man where man is, and was made “in all things” man, as man is; that little Child, God’s first-born, was, at the direction of the Lord, taken into Egypt, and was brought out again, “that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, OUT OF EGYPT HAVE I CALLED MY SON.” Matthew 2:11— Thus in the life of Christ, which is the true life for all mankind, God has fixed it forever that the Egypt of His law, the Egypt of the ten commandments, is spiritual Egypt; that spiritual Egypt is sin; and that every soul must be delivered from Egypt, from the realm and bondage of sin, before he can possibly serve the Lord; before he can walk in the Lord’s law.STSG 42.3

    Is Brother Gamble a son of God in truth? It is so only because he has been called out of Egypt; for it is written, “Out of Egypt have I called My son.”STSG 43.1

    Are Christians sons of God, in truth? It is so only because they have been called out of Egypt; for it is written, “Out of Egypt have I called My son.”STSG 43.2

    Having been called out of Egypt, that he may serve the Lord, will Brother Gamble now refuse to serve the Lord? will he refuse to walk in the law of the Lord? Having been called out of Egypt, that they may serve the Lord, shall Christians refuse to serve the Lord, to walk in His law? and will Brother Gamble teach them so? If so, it can be only because they “in their hearts turned back again into Egypt” (Acts 7:39); and in so doing, they will certainly fall in the wilderness.STSG 43.3

    It is the vital truth of the gospel which from God is written that “Israel is My son;” that “out of Egypt have I called My son;” that this is done that Israel may serve the Lord by walking in His law; and that the Sabbath of the Lord, the seventh day, is the Lord’s own chosen test to Israel, whether they will walk in His law or no. Exodus 4:22, 23; Matthew 2:15; Exodus 16:4, 27-31; Hebrews 4:1-9.STSG 43.4

    Brother Gamble insists that the law of ten commandments, that mentions the deliverance from Egypt, with its Sabbath, is only for Israel. Let it be so; it is the Decalogue of Exodus 20 that originally mentions the deliverance from Egypt. Let it be then “only for Israel:” that Israel is only spiritual Israel, because that law is only a spiritual law. For “they are not all Israel, which are of Israel; neither, because they are the seed of Abraham, are they all children: but, In Isaac shall thy seed be called. That is, They which are the children of the flesh, these are not the children of God: but the children of the promise are counted for the seed.” “Now we, brethren, as Isaac was, are the children of promise.” “And IF YE BE CHRIST’S, then are ye Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise.” Romans 9:6-8; Galatians 4:28; 3:29.STSG 44.1

    “Thus saith the Lord, Israel is My son, even My first-born.” “Out of Egypt have I called My son.” “And I say unto thee, Let My son go, that he may serve Me.”STSG 44.2

    “I AM “the Lord thy God, “which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage....STSG 44.3

    “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy.... The seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God.”STSG 45.1

    “Out of Egypt have I called My son.” “Behold, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God.” Therefore Christians can thank the Lord forever that the Author of the holy law given at Sinai is both Creator and Redeemer, and is the Christian’s Lawgiver.STSG 45.2

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