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    June 1903

    “Address by Alonzo T. Jones” The Medical Missionary, 12, 5, pp. 145-147.

    ATJ

    “EVERY house is builded by some man; but he that built all things is God.” When God had built all things, as the crown of creation he formed man. This creation of man was nothing less than the building of a temple in which the Lord himself might dwell, which he might fill with his glory, and in which he alone should be glorified.MEDM June 1903, page 145.1

    But, as illustrated in that other and typical temple of later times—the temple built by Solomon—this first temple was perverted to base and idolatrous uses, to defiling and profane purposes. Man yielded himself to the service of sin and Satan. And thus the temple which God had built to the glory of himself, and to be the place of his own recognized and supreme presence, was debased and defiled by the presence of the spirit of the evil one. But God had not built this temple for any such use. Therefore he gave himself to redeem mankind, to restore to its true place and uses the desecrated and debased temple, that it should again stand in the true Light reflecting the glory of the real presence of him who would dwell within.MEDM June 1903, page 145.2

    As man was created he was perfect and upright: perfect in mind and body, as well as upright in soul and spirit. But sin subverted and destroyed it all. With sin there came sickness and disease as well as death. And when the Creator would redeem, he became the Redeemer from sickness and disease as well as from sin and death. Accordingly when he came down to deliver his people from Egypt, the land of sin and bondage, and so to show to benighted mankind the way of deliverance from all sin and bondage, the very first revelation that he made after their son of deliverance at the Red Sea, was the revelation of the way of deliverance from disease, the revelation of himself as “the Lord that healed thee.” This thought was ever held and continued throughout his revelation, even to the latest writer of the Bible by whom he has recorded this best of all possible wishes: “I wish above all things that thou mayest prosper and be in health, even as thy soul prospereth.”MEDM June 1903, page 145.3

    Christ, the great center of divinity and humanity; Christ the Saviour of the world, struck this same blessed note, for “himself took our infirmities and bear our sicknesses;” and he set this blessed example for his church to the ends of the world, for “anointed with the Holy Ghost and with power,” he not only “went about doing good” but also “healing all that were oppressed of the devil.” And so “the whole multitude sought to touch him, for there went virtue out of him and healed them all.”MEDM June 1903, page 145.4

    Thus God’s gift of saving health—the knowledge of the way of deliverance from disease, of the true way of health, and of God as the true healer—was at the beginning bestowed upon his church for all mankind, and in Christ was confirmed unto his church for all mankind and for all ages.MEDM June 1903, page 145.5

    But courting and adopting the so-called philosophy and science of the world, the church forgot this mighty truth, and lost this gracious, precious gift of God. Instead of prizing or even remembering the wonderful work of God in building this temple of the human body, or his revealed will and wish concerning the care and preservation of it, the soul was made the all in all, while the body was despised, neglected, afflicted, and starved as the base and wicked chief hindrance to the “immortal soul” in its philosophic heavenly aspirations. This to the extent that the chiefest saints were held to be those who most despised, neglected, and afflicted the body, and had the least possible respect or use for it.MEDM June 1903, page 146.1

    But such is not the way of God. Such is not Christianity. Such is not the truth and the gift committed to the church of Christ. No. “Ye are the temple of the living God, for God hath said, I will dwell in them and walk in them ... Come out from among them and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean... Wherefore ... let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and of the spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of God.” “Thou art an holy people unto the Lord thy God: the Lord hath chosen thee to be a special people unto himself, above all people that are upon the face of the earth.... Wherefore it shall come to pass, if ye harken to these judgments, and keep, and do them, that the Lord thy God shall keep unto thee the covenant and the mercy which he swore unto thy fathers.... And the Lord will take away from thee all sickness, and will put none of the evil diseases of Egypt, which thou knowest, upon thee.” “I am the Lord that healeth thee.”MEDM June 1903, page 146.2

    This divine truth which God gave to his church immediately upon delivering her from Egypt—from sin and bondage—he will never allow to be last nor perpetually to be made little of. God still has a church—a special people—in the world: and by that church he will still make know the truth and the gift of his saving health among all nations. And this building in which we are here assembled to-day to dedicate to God, this building with all who shall be connected with it, and the church which is back of it, is intended to be only the means of making know to all people, even to the ends of the earth and the end of the world, God’s message and blessing of saving health.MEDM June 1903, page 146.3

    And so, to-day, as we stand here to dedicate this grand temple of health, let all understand, as we are only glad to announce to all, that the only purpose of its being on earth, the only purpose for which it is dedicated to God, is that to the fullest possible extent it shall be a means of bringing every soul on earth to the place where he will stand with God in Jesus Christ, a living temple of health to the glory of God.MEDM June 1903, page 146.4

    Prof. M. V. O’Shea, of the University of Wisconsin, gave a masterly address showing the intimate relation that exists between the physical, mental, and moral nature of men, and pointing out the development that is taking place in methods of education as well as in the treatment of disease. He claimed that cheerfulness of spirit was a necessary condition in restoring or retaining health. A high tribute of appreciation of the spirit that pervades the Sanitarium and touches all who come within its reach, was paid by the speaker, who closed by wishing for the institution even greater prosperity than in the past. He said: “One feels the better side of things here; he feels the unselfishness of those who seek to help him, and their genuineness, he feels their devotion to higher ideals, and their trust in things good and true, and this healthful, harmonious feeling becomes contagious. Out in the world are struggle and tension, selfishness and avarice, and one who soul is afflicted with these diseases will have a corrupt body as well. Health is simply the harmony of the organism with its environments. This is the lesson taught by this institution and practised by all who have adopted its principles.”MEDM June 1903, page 146.5

    Prof. F. N. Scott, of the University of Michigan, was in early young manhood a member of the Sanitarium family as private secretary to Dr. Kellogg. He improved this opportunity to discharge what he considered a twofold debt laid upon him by the benefits of the institution and by a personal association with its principles and those who cherish them.MEDM June 1903, page 146.6

    Hon. E. C. Nichols, one of Battle Creek’s leading and most honored citizens, spoke at some length in high appreciation of what had been achieved from so small a beginning. He spoke feelingly of the triumph of the principles embraced in the work of the Sanitarium, in that they had risen from a place of ridicule and almost contempt to command the respect of all classes, and had made the name and reputation of Battle Creek famous throughout the world. Mr. Nichols adduced the testimony of a celebrated scientist, a familiar friend of his own, who had often referred to the work done in the analyzing and demonstrating laboratories of the Sanitarium as being in advance of anything accomplished elsewhere either in the New or Old World.MEDM June 1903, page 147.1

    Mr. Nichols was followed by another prominent citizen of Battle Creek, Hon. S. O. Bush, who spoke in terms of warm congratulation to those who had wrought so successfully in erecting the splendid edifice which they were now dedicating for service. He also congratulated the city in having such an institution in its midst. He exhorted his fellow-citizens to do all in their power to encourage those who have such a noble work in hand. “Let us each,” said the speaker, “have goodly words to say in its favor instead of ill-omened words.”MEDM June 1903, page 147.2

    Mayor Webb spoke kindly words of appreciation on his own behalf as well as that of the city. What seemed at first to be an irreparable disaster had proved to be a blessing in disguise since it had resulted in the erection of a building so superior to the old one, so in advance of any other of its kind. He referred to the heroism displayed by the employees on the night of the fires as a record that any city should be proud of. He bade the Sanitarium God-speed in its work.MEDM June 1903, page 147.3

    Hon. Washington Gardner addressed the people at some length in his usual telling manner. He perceived coming into our public and private life a spirit of compassion as manifested in the beneficent care of the State for its dependent and unfortunate classes. There is more regard of man for man. “We are,” said the speaker, “now in the presence of an institution unique in its character for disinterested benevolence, that has built up its work and carried it on without money or profit to the individual. We have with us those who have labored to carry on this work until it has become known in every part of the world. What an inspiration for a young man! The opportunities are not all in the past. They are still here. They lie all along the pathway of our youth. Seize them, young man.”MEDM June 1903, page 147.4

    Judge Arthur spoke from the standpoint of a member of the Sanitarium family. He told us of his dismay and tears at seeing the destruction of the former building when it seemed that the angry flames would not leave anything from which the work could have a resurrection. And then he told how hope and faith sprang up at the thought that the sanitarium was not burned and could not be burned, as it was the work of God, and God’s work could not perish. In the midst of the destruction a frail woman waited in here room for someone to come to her rescue. At last the faithful nurse came and said with surprise, “Why, are you still here in the building?” And the feeble patient answered calmly, “I was perfectly assured, for I knew God is here, and that I should be taken care of.” They went to the fire-escape and out of the falling building, and she was probably the last lady to come out of the fire. “The knowledge of this faith strengthened me,” the speaker said. And as he looked upon the platform of truth upon which the work of the Sanitarium is built he saw it could not be devoured by fire.MEDM June 1903, page 147.5

    Dr. J. F. Morse of the Sanitarium faculty spoke briefly of the comfort and encouragement that had come to the workers in the hour of their great trial, and in times of the severest anxiety, from the helpful words and generous deeds of those who were their friends. “The things we are doing and saying to-day do not dedicate this work. The completeness with which the work and principles here represented enter into our hearts determines to us the meaning of dedication day. If from this time forth our lives shall contain more that is helpful, the loving word, the kindly greeting, the deeds that lift up the down cast soul, then this will indeed be a day of dedication.”MEDM June 1903, page 147.6

    Dr. Chas. E. Steward made a clear statement concerning the destruction of the old building and the construction of the new. He spoke of the providential deliverance of the helpless people from the fire and of the task of reinstating the broken-up family. Notwithstanding the great calamity the work had gone forward with much greater success than had been expected under such circumstances. Dr. Steward as a member of the building committee gave an interesting account of the vast amount of material and labor required to construct the building, and concluded with a hearty expression of thanks to those who had so nobly assisted in the great task.MEDM June 1903, page 148.1

    The concluding speech of the occasion was by J. H. Kellogg, M. D., the superintendent of the Sanitarium. Of this we are pleased to present quite a full outline:—MEDM June 1903, page 148.2

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