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    ADAM’S INTELLECTUAL NATURE

    I see no reason for departing from the analogy of God’s works on this point. His intellect was gradually developed, most likely, like any child’s. The animal, or physical, first appears - then, gradually maturing, the intellect commences its development, with one idea or thought at a time. Up to the time Adam took the forbidden fruit he is, evidently, very imperfect in the development of intellect. But says one, “he must have been very wise and knowing, for he gave names to all the cattle, etc.” What if he did - does that prove him a giant in knowledge? I know it is said, he gave them names descriptive of their natures, but I know, also, that such a position is a mere assumption without proof. Who can tell now what name Adam gave to one of the “living creatures?” And if they could, how can it be proved that that name is any more descriptive of its nature than any other? Parents now delight to try the intellect of their little children; and it not unfrequently happens that these children give some very odd names to some things, and their parents delighted with this effort to use intellect often adopt the name the child has given to an object; and for a time will use the odd name with much pleasure, because it proves to them an opening mind, and this gives them joy. This circumstance of Adam’s giving names to beasts, etc., is but a sorry proof of his being such an anomaly in knowledge as our modern theology represents him to have been.SSII 141.1

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