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    ORGANIZATION

    In the early history of the cause, in the absence of organized, united action among our people, measures had to be carried very much by individual responsibility and effort. This was not only laborious in the extreme, and sometimes very painful, to the pioneers in the cause; but what most cut them to the heart with feelings of discouragement was the fact that their very best efforts were liable to be counteracted at any time by those who, from want of experience, and from want of humility to learn from those whom God had raised up to lead out in the work, were willing tools of Satan to excite rebellion and cause confusion.EAAP 11.2

    But, thank God, those sad days are past. Old things, in this respect, are passed away, and all things have become new. This work is now in the hands of men chosen annually by our people. Our people, having elected them to office, will sustain them. And those who choose to rebel against the order, established customs, and acknowledged agencies employed in this cause from the beginning will not have the pleasure of oppressing individuals, and injuring their influence with the tongue of slander; but they will have to meet the influence of the men our people put in office, and through them the body of our people.EAAP 12.1

    With Seventh-day Adventists, organization was not so much a matter of choice as of necessity. It was first entered into very cautiously by some, and reluctantly by others. And as numbers have increased, and missionary fields have opened before us, we have all come to prize our simple, and, to human view, complete organization. The history of our cause bears a decided testimony in favor of our system of organization. The men who framed it, and introduced it, felt the importance of their work. The Guiding Hand was with them, which is the reason why the lapse of more than ten years has not revealed defects demanding changes. We unhesitatingly express our firm convictions that organization with us was by the direct providence of God. And to disregard our organization is an insult to God’s providential dealings with us, and a sin of no small magnitude.EAAP 12.2

    The permanency of the cause, and united effort of all our people to push the work forward, depends upon the establishment and maintenance of order. And this cannot be done without proper organization. And organization exists only in form when the offices of such organization are trampled under foot.EAAP 12.3

    No man, capable of filling any office in the cause of God, will feel exalted by such promotion. The true principle bearing upon this subject is expressed by our Lord in these words: “Whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant.” While those who are leaders and officers should be regarded as such, the respect which they may receive will lead them to highly esteem and love those who sustain them in their official duties.EAAP 13.1

    Our General Conference is the highest earthly authority with our people, and is designed to take charge of the entire work in this and all other countries. The officers of our State Conferences, and, also, those of our institutions located at Battle Creek, are expected to respect our General Conference Committee as the men appointed to take the general supervision of the cause in all its branches and interests. They should be regarded as the safest counselors, and the proper persons to give advice in all important matters.EAAP 13.2

    One or more of the General Conference Committee should be present at each State Conference, and should take part in all deliberations and counsels, especially in licensing men to improve their gifts in teaching the word of God, and auditing accounts, and settling with ministers. These men, who labor from State to State, and have their minds exercised with the matters pertaining to the general wants and dangers of the cause, are far better qualified to judge of the local wants of State Conferences than their own officers possibly can be.EAAP 13.3

    The several State Conferences are appointing men to move to Battle Creek to take charge of the leading interests of our cause located in that city. This subject would not have been agitated, and the plan would not have received the sanction of our General Conference, had it not been indispensably necessary. These representative men and families stand in close connection with our efficient General Conference Committee. Should one of them prove to be not the person for the place, he will be reported back to his State Conference by the General Conference Committee, and another will be appointed by the State Conference to fill his place.EAAP 14.1

    The General Conference, and also our State Conferences, will be sustained by our people far and near. And the representative men and families, who bear the burdens of the work at Battle Creek, will have the prayers and the confidence of our people everywhere.EAAP 14.2

    All persons of sound judgment will admire the wisdom and safety of our arrangements to guard our institutions and cause. They have been made with the greatest care and no small sacrifice. And now for any of our people to withhold their confidence, sympathy, and support, from the General Conference Committee and the picked men at Battle Creek, and take stock in a spirit of murmuring and fault-finding that may arise in consequence of decided action for the right and against wrong, would be not only an insult upon the General Conference, the State Conferences, the men sent to Battle Creek, but our entire system of order and organization. It is the duty of our General Conference Committee to understand how matters are moving in all departments of the cause, to correct wrongs, and to sustain the right. And it would be an exhibition of folly for those who know but very little of the workings of the cause to set up their judgment against those who know all about it, and are annually appointed to take charge of it. The field of labor has already become extensive, and new branches of the work are constantly arising, demanding the attention and watchcare of the General Conference Committee.EAAP 14.3

    Works must be prepared expressly for translation into other languages. This great and important work of publishing the message in other languages claims immediate attention. The Lord has given the cause brethren Brownsberger, Lichtenstein, and others, to assist in the work.EAAP 15.1

    An appeal from the friends in Oregon and Washington Territory is now in the hands of the Committee, and we hope they will be able to send a safe and efficient missionary to that promising field soon. And there are other similar calls that should have attention. And the scattered friends of the cause must be patient, and ever bear in mind that the only proper way for missionary work to be carried forward is under the supervision of our General Conference Committee.EAAP 15.2

    The present policy of calling one or more of our most reliable men from the several States to guard our institutions at Battle Creek, and to represent our people in the different States, will not fail to establish that complete confidence in the minds and hearts of our people everywhere that no other means can. And when these men of God, after prayer and careful reflection, say to our people in the several States that one, or two, or three hundred thousand dollars are wanted for the glory of God and the advancement of his cause, it will be forwarded without delay. Whatever lack of confidence there may have been in the minds of any, in the management of affairs at Battle Creek up to the present time, under the present policy, such doubts will simply be unreasonable. The men who have come to Battle Creek, have done so at no small sacrifice for the sake of the cause. And these are the very last to be called in question. If we cannot confide in the men appointed to this position by the State Conferences, we can confide in none.EAAP 15.3

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