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    CHARACTER OF THE WORK

    As to the character of the work which resulted from giving what was called the midnight cry, it evidently was the special work of God. It was not, as many supposed the result of fanaticism.SCOC 71.1

    1. Because it bore the marks of the especial providence of God. It was not characterized by those extremes ever manifested where human excitement, and not the word and Spirit of God, has the controlling influence. It was in harmony with those seasons of humiliation, rending of heart, confession and complete consecration of all, which are matters of history in the Old Testament, and are made matters of duty in the New.SCOC 71.2

    2. Because it was subversive of all those forms of fanaticism which had made their appearance somewhat in connection with the second-advent cause. These were at once swallowed up by the solemn power of the midnight cry, as the rods of the magicians were by the rod of Aaron.SCOC 71.3

    3. Because the work was marked with sobriety, humility, solemnity, reverence, self-examination, repentance, confessions, and tears, instead of lightness, exaltation, trifling, irreverent expressions, self-justification, pride in spiritual things, voluntary humility and will-worship, which generally characterize the conduct of fanatics.SCOC 71.4

    4. Because the work bore the fruit of the Spirit of God, as set forth in the New Testament. It was evidently guided by wisdom from above. The apostle James declares this wisdom to be “first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be entreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy.” Chap. 3:17. Paul says that the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, long-suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance. Galatians 5:22, 23. These are the good fruits of the work and Spirit of God, and these did all appear in an eminent sense as the results of the midnight cry.SCOC 72.1

    Of all the great religious movements since the days of the first apostles of our Lord, none stand out more pure and free from the imperfections of human nature and the wiles of Satan, than that of the autumn of 1844. In fact, after looking back upon it for more than twenty-six years as the greenest spot on all the way in which God has led his people, we do not see how it could have been better, at least so far as the direct providence and work of God is concerned. It was beyond the control of human hands, or human minds. Men and demons sought to hinder and to mar this work; but the power that attended it brushed away their influence as you would remove a spider’s web, and there stood the work of God, free from the print of a man’s hand.SCOC 72.2

    The Advent Shield published in January, 1845, bears testimony to the character of that work, in words of truth and soberness. And let it be borne in mind of truth and soberness. And let it be borne in mind that the Shield was a standard work, of 440 pages, for all Adventists at that time, and that the following testimony from it was not published till about three months after the seventh-month movement, when Adventists had taken time to review the past, and settle, as was supposed, upon a firm, united position:SCOC 72.3

    “It produced everywhere the most deep searching of heart and humiliation of soul before the God of high Heaven. It caused a weaning of affections from the things of this world, a healing of the controversies and animosities, a confession of wrongs, a breaking down before God, and penitent, broken-hearted supplications to him for pardon and acceptance. It caused self-abasement and prostration of soul, such as we never before witnessed.”SCOC 73.1

    Verses 8, 9: “And the foolish said unto the wise, Give us of your oil; for our lamps are gone out. But the wise answered, saying, Not so; lest there be not enough for us and you; but go ye rather to them that sell, and buy for yourselves.” Those who had no part in the great advent movement can scarcely form any idea of that work. But those who took part in that work know that the burden of testimony to believers everywhere was that the preparation was an individual work. All were faithfully warned to look to God, and obtain an individual experience. The urgent requests for help from those in whom the work had been superficial, and the faithful responses of those who had the work at heart, are well illustrated by the above conversation between the foolish and wise virgins.SCOC 73.2

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