Ellen G. White Writings

<< Back Forward >>

«Back «Prev. Pub. «Ch «Pg   Pg» Ch» Next Pub.» Forward»

The Adventist Home, Page 369

means for needless things, and especially will it prove a blessing to the rich by guarding them from indulging in extravagances.

Every week the demands of God upon each family are brought to mind by each of its members fully carrying out the plan; and as they have denied themselves some superfluity in order to have means to put into the treasury, lessons of value in self-denial for the glory of God have been impressed upon the heart. Once a week each is brought face to face with the doings of the past week—the income that he might have had if he had been economical, and the means that he does not have because of indulgence. His conscience is reined up, as it were, before God and either commends or accuses him. He learns that if he retains peace of mind and the favor of God, he must eat and drink and dress to His glory.7Ibid., 3:412.

Make God's Requirements First—God's requirements come first. We are not doing His will if we consecrate to Him what is left of our income after all our imaginary wants have been supplied. Before any part of our earnings is consumed, we should take out and present to Him that portion which He claims. In the old dispensation an offering of gratitude was kept continually burning upon the altar, thus showing man's endless obligation to God. If we have prosperity in our secular business, it is because God blesses us. A part of this income is to be devoted to the poor, and a large portion to be applied to the cause of God. When that which God claims is rendered to Him, the remainder will be sanctified and blessed to our own use. But when a man robs God by withholding that which He requires, His curse rests upon the whole.8Ibid., 4:477.

«Back «Prev. Pub. «Ch «Pg   Pg» Ch» Next Pub.» Forward»