Ellen G. White Writings

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Historical Sketches of the Foreign Missions of the Seventh-day Adventists, Page 207

time of their visitation. In their pride of heart they refuse his guidance, and are left to walk in their own counsels, and, like God's ancient people, to reap the harvest which they have sown.

Christiania

Friday morning, October 30, we reached Christiania, Norway, and were soon in the home of Eld. A. B. Oyen, a retired and pleasant location in the suburbs of the city. Here the household language was our own familiar English, and it almost seemed that we were once more in our native America.

At Christiania we have a church of one hundred and twenty members, and here is located our Scandinavian publishing house. The new mission printing-house and meeting-hall were not completed, and part of the old building which Eld. Matteson bought six years ago, and in which were the printing-house and meeting-hall, had been torn down to give place to the new; therefore we had no hall of our own that was suitable for meetings. But the Good Templars very kindly gave us the free use of their hall, which would seat over three hundred.

About two hundred attended the meeting Sabbath forenoon, and in the afternoon one hundred assembled to celebrate the ordinances of the Lord's house. A large hall belonging to a workingmen's society had been hired for Sunday forenoon, and I addressed an attentive congregation of about fourteen hundred. The hall was crowded, and many went away, unable to obtain an entrance.

Tuesday we went about thirty miles from Christiania, to Drammen, a city of several thousand inhabitants, where there is a church of twenty members. Here, as in other places, it was difficult to obtain a good hall. But the best in the place was secured, a hall used for balls and concerts, about thirty-six by eighty feet in size, with a narrow gallery on each side, and a huge stove in each end. There was no pulpit nor place for one. Six beer tables, brought in from an adjoining room, served to make a platform. A square carpet was thrown over this platform, and another table set on top for light-stand and pulpit, while steps were made with chairs and stools. We doubt if the hall or beer tables were ever put to so good use before. The people came and filled the seats, the galleries, and all the standing room, and listened with the best of attention while I spoke to them of the love of Christ, and his life of sacrifice.

Wednesday and Friday evenings another hall was secured in Christiania, and I spoke to about five hundred each evening.

A Large Temperance Meeting

On Sunday, by request of the president of the temperance society, I spoke upon the subject of temperance. The meeting was held in the soldiers’ military gymnasium, the largest hall in the city. An American flag was placed as a canopy above the pulpit; this was an attention which I highly appreciated. There were about sixteen hundred assembled. Among them was a bishop of the State Church, with a number of the clergy; a large proportion were of the better class of society.

I took up the subject from a religious stand-point, showing that the Bible is full of history bearing upon temperance, and that Christ was connected with the work of temperance, even from the beginning. It was by the indulgence of

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