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    THE FUNERAL SERVICES

    Owing to the distance of many of the relatives from the scene of his death, a son being in California and a brother in Massachusetts, the date of the funeral was fixed for Sabbath, Aug. 13, one week from the day of his death. The brother in Massachusetts, Rev. Samuel White, was prevented by feeble health from attending; but W. C. White and wife arrived from Oakland, California, the day previous; and another brother of the deceased, Rev. John White, for many years a presiding elder in the Methodist Conference of Ohio, together with his son-in-law, were present from that State. These with Sister White, J. E. White and wife, and Mrs. Mary Chase, a sister of the deceased, who has for some time resided in Battle Creek, constituted the relatives who were present.IMJW 21.1

    Although the day was the most busy one in the week for those not of our faith, the people of this vicinity showed their respect for the deceased by attending the funeral in large numbers. The main auditorium and the gallery of the Tabernacle were completely filled, and the sliding partitions being raised, quite a portion of the surrounding vestries was also filled. It is estimated that twenty-five hundred people were present, making it the largest funeral ever held in this city.IMJW 21.2

    A large portrait of the deceased was suspended from the arch over the pulpit, suitably draped in black, as were also the arch and the desk. The employees of the Review office, of whom there are more than a hundred, wore appropriate badges of mourning, and nearly all of them joined in a foot procession accompanying to the grave the ninety-five carriages that constituted the funeral train.IMJW 21.3

    The religious services were conducted by Elder Uriah Smith, who has been associated with Elder White during the greater part of his public labors, more especially in the publishing work, and who, more than any one else, was intimately acquainted with his character, his plans, and his work. The funeral address was a tribute of respect and affection, eulogistic, as befitting the occasion, and one in which those who best knew the deceased could heartily join. The following is a verbatim report:—IMJW 22.1

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