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The Doctrine of Christ

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    LESSON FIFTY-EIGHT The Inheritance

    1. Man’s sin brought a curse upon the earth, and the salvation of man includes the deliverance of the earth. Genesis 3:17, 18; Romans 8:20-22; Luke 19:10.TDOC 160.3

    2. The first promise of the land of Canaan, afterward interpreted to extend to the whole earth, was made to the seed of Abraham, or Christ. Genesis 12:7; Romans 4:13; Galatians 3:16.TDOC 160.4

    3. The land thus promised was the new earth, regarded as an inheritance, and the promise was confirmed to Abraham, by a covenant. Genesis 15:7, 8, 12-18; Psalm 105:8-12; Galatians 3:17, 18.TDOC 160.5

    4. Faithful believers, through their union with Christ and their adoption as sons, share with him in all the inheritance to which he is heir. Galatians 4:4, 5; Romans 8:16, 17; Revelation 21:7; Matthew 25:34; Hebrews 1:2; Galatians 3:29.TDOC 161.1

    5. The same truth is taught in another way when the inheritance is promised to those who reveal the character of Christ. Psalm 37:11, 29, 34; Matthew 5:5; Isaiah 60:21; Hebrews 9:15; 1 Corinthians 6:9, 10; Acts 20:32; 26:18; Colossians 1:12.TDOC 161.2

    6. In the complete restoration which is accomplished through the gift and the work of Christ, all things will become new, including man and the earth. Revelation 21:5; Ephesians 2:15; 4:24; Revelation 21:1.TDOC 161.3

    NOTES
    The earth restored

    “To carry out the original counsel or purpose of the Creator, the work of redemption must include more than the recovery of man from sin and death; it must include the restoration of the earth. The curse must be removed, and the earth be restored to that state of freedom from evil in which it was when God pronounced everything ‘very good.’ Without the redemption of the earth, creation would never be entirely recovered from the foul blot brought upon it by sin. Satan would triumph thus far, that a reproach and a stain would not only be cast upon the work of the Creator, but it would be perpetuated; the evil would be immortalized.”TDOC 161.4

    Joint heirs with Christ

    “But if children, then also heirs. God’s heirs, Christ’s coheirs, possessors in prospect of our Father’s heaven (toward which the whole argument now gravitates), in union of interest and life with our Firstborn Brother, in whom lies our right. From one hand a gift, infinitely merciful and surprising, that unseen bliss will be from another the lawful portion of the lawful child, one with the Beloved of the Father. Such heirs we are, if indeed we share his sufferings, those deep but hallowed pains which will surely come to us as we live in and for him in a fallen world, that we may also share his glory, for which that path of sorrow is, not indeed the meriting, but the capacitating, preparation.”TDOC 161.5

    The goodly land

    “The goodly land! I can hardly forbear, before I close, casting a glance forward to that heavenly inheritance which is the objective point of all our struggles, our toils, and our desires. I see there a land which stands in a wonderful contrast to this. As the hymn says,TDOC 161.6

    ‘Oh! how unlike the present world,
    Will be the one to come!’
    TDOC 161.7

    “I see fields smiling in living green, trees majestic in their wealth of verdure, flowers dazzling with their rainbow hues, and on neither field nor tree nor flower do I see the touch of frost, or the pale hand of decay. I ace no footprints of the curse, no sears of sin. I see no pestilence walking in darkness, nor destruction wasting at noonday. I see no forms distorted with pain, nor brows furrowed with anxiety and care. I see no mournful shafts telling where weary forms and sad and broken hearts have gone down into dust and darkness. I see no painful messages passing over that land, as two days ago we received one here, telling that a friend, a brother, a fellow laborer, had fallen beneath the cruel stroke of a relentless foe. I see no darkened room where the tide of a precious life is ebbing slowly away. I see no bosoms heaving with anguish, no badges of mourning, no funeral trains, no yawning, insatiate grave. But on the other hand, I see a glorious company who bear bright palms of victory over death and the grave. I see, as one of our hymns says, that—TDOC 162.1

    ‘The glory of God like a molten sea, Bathes the immortal company.’TDOC 162.2

    “I see every eye sparkling with the fullness of the joy that reigns within. I see on every cheek the bloom of eternal youth and everlasting health. I see every limb lithe and strong. I see the lame man leaping as a hart. I see the blind gazing with rapture on the celestial glory. I see the deaf listening enchanted to the heavenly melody. I see the dumb joining with loud voice in the anthems of praise. I see the mother clasping to her bosom the children she had lost awhile in the land of the enemy, but now recovered forever. I see long-parted friends meet in eternal reunion. I see a river so pure and clear, so charged with every element of refreshment and life, that it is called ‘the river of life.’ I see a tree overarching all, so healing in its leaves, so vivifying in its fruits, that it is called ‘the tree of life.’ I see a great white throne in whose effulgence there is no need of moon or sun to give us light. I hear a voice saying to that victorious company, ‘This is your rest forever, and you shall no more be acquainted with grief; for there shall be no more pain or death, and sorrow and mourning have forever fled away.’ And in all the universe then see no trace of sin or suffering, but I hear from every world and from every creature, a joyous anthem, like the sound of many waters, going up to God; and they say, ‘Blessing, and honor, and glory, and power, be unto him that sits upon the throne, and unto the Lamb forever and ever.’TDOC 162.3

    “Such is the goodly land we may go up and possess. Such is the land that awaits every laborer who is faithful to the end. The Spirit and bride say, Come; and’ whosoever will, may come. If any here have not yet turned their feet Zion ward, let me say, ‘Come with us, and we will do thee good.”-From a sermon by Elder Uriah Smith, October 26, 1889.TDOC 162.4

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