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    June 24, 1889

    “Editorial Correspondence” The Signs of the Times, 15, 24.

    E. J. Waggoner

    After a journey of five days from Oakland, devoid of unusual incident, I reached Chicago, the morning of May 22. At the mission rooms, 26 and 28 College Place, where I at once went, I met Brethren Olsen and White, just from the camp-meeting at Ottawa, Kansas, and Brethren Saunders, Hope, and Hutchison, who had preceded me from California, and had reached this point on their journey to England. These brethren went on to Battle Creek, Mich., the same day, while I remained at the mission till the next day. This was a privilege which I had long desired to enjoy. The mission is in a most delightful location, and is as well equipped for carrying on the business for which it was designed as can be imagined. I greatly enjoyed the hospitality of this family of workers, with Elder G. B. Starr at the head, and still more did I enjoy the privilege of uniting with them in their regular weekly prayer and missionary meeting, and in their family worship. Brother Starr laid before us his plans for the missionary training school to be held in the fall, and we feel sure that it will be a means of much good to those who attend.SITI June 24, 1889, page 295.186

    After spending three days with my mother, in Michigan, and one day with the book Committee in Battle Creek, I came on to Williamsport, arriving here May 28. The workers’ meeting had then been in session just one week, Elder A. T. Jones in charge. About fifty workers were present, and a good degree of interest was exhibited. Several expressed themselves as already having received light on the subject of the righteousness of God and how it may become ours through faith in Christ.SITI June 24, 1889, page 295.187

    At the present writing, June 6, the camp-meeting proper should have been in session three days, but owing to the great flood, the attendance is just the same as during the workers’ meeting. To-day a train leaves Williamsport for the first time in six days. All communication with the outside world has been cut off, and it was feared that no Conference session could be held; but after viewing the situation, the brethren have concluded that the churches are well enough represented to allow of the business being transacted. So the exercises will go on to the close of the appointed time, just the same as though there was the expected attendance. But for the flood, the camp-meeting would have been the largest ever held in this State, as more tents had been ordered than ever before; but the brethren in charge are of good courage, and doubt not that even this will be made to work for good. Sister White arrived yesterday, having been six days making the trip from Battle Creek, and three days making the last fifty miles of the journey by wagon.SITI June 24, 1889, page 295.188

    Of the terrible calamity that has befallen this section of Pennsylvania, the readers of the SIGNS OF THE TIMES have learned ere this from the secular papers. But no tongue can ever describe the situation. Next to Johnstown, which was almost entirely swept out of existence, Williamsport was the greatest loser. The loss in this town is many millions of property and quite a number of lives, how many is not yet known. In the section of the town nearest the river, it is impossible to tell were the streets run. Houses, mills, logs, lumber, and almost everything else, are left in one confused mass. The stock of goods in nearly every store in the city was almost completely ruined. Not the least feature of the calamity is the danger of disease from the decaying matter that fills the streets.SITI June 24, 1889, page 295.189

    Although the camp-ground was on the outskirts of town, near the hills, it was covered to a depth of three feet by the waters, which rose so rapidly Sabbath, June 1, that all were compelled to flee. No one was injured, however, and comparatively little loss was sustained by the campers. The inconvenience suffered was nothing compared with the suffering of those who lost their homes and members of their families in the angry flood.SITI June 24, 1889, page 295.190

    The weather now is pleasant and seems to be settled, and the prospects for a happy termination of the meeting are good. E. J. W.SITI June 24, 1889, page 295.191

    “Baptized by Fire” The Signs of the Times, 15, 24.

    E. J. Waggoner

    How often do we hear people ask the Lord to baptize them with the Holy Ghost and with fire! But they do not know for what they are asking. They connect in a vague sort of way Matthew 3:11 and Acts 2:3, and suppose the latter to be the fulfillment of the former. But even though the cloven tongues were as of fire, and although they were upon all, the disciples were not in any sense baptized with the tongues or the fire. Baptize means to immerse, not to sit upon. They were on the day of Pentecost baptized with the Holy Spirit. The room in which they were was filled with the divine, life-giving influence, and they were literally immersed in the Holy Spirit, and the tongues were but another manifestation of the same Spirit.SITI June 24, 1889, page 295.192

    There are two classes spoken of by John in Matthew 3:11. One class-the faithful-will be baptized with the Holy Spirit; the other-the wicked-will be baptized by fire; immersed in the lake of fire (Revelation 20:15), and utterly burned up. Revelation 20:9. This application of Matthew 3:11 is shown to be correct, by the next verse: “He shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire; whose fan is in his hand, and he will thoroughly purge his floor, and gather his wheat into the garner; but he will burn up the chaff with unquenchable fire.”SITI June 24, 1889, page 295.193

    Let no one pray, therefore, to be baptized with fire, unless he wishes the Lord to burn him with fire. E. J. W.SITI June 24, 1889, page 295.194

    “An Appeal to the Liberal-Hearted” The Signs of the Times, 15, 24.

    E. J. Waggoner

    Among the losers by the recent flood in Williamsport was the Pennsylvania Tract Society. The waters rose so rapidly and so unexpectedly that scarcely anything could be removed to a place of safety, and upwards of fifteen hundred dollars’ worth of books was ruined. Several of our brethren also suffered the loss of furniture that was upon the lower floor of their dwellings. The Pennsylvania society is young, and can ill afford to stand this loss. It has been one of the most active of our Tract Societies, and we appeal to the friends of the cause to assist it financially in this time of need. We feel sure that our brethren will respond promptly, and thus encourage the hearts of the workers in this State. This we feel is the least that can be done. Aside from this, there is suffering in the flooded district by those who have lost everything, which cannot be described or even imagined. Requests for help for these sufferers have met with a response from various portions of the country, and we hope that our brethren will remember that true Christian charity does not consist in remembering only those of their own number. A little from a great many will not impoverish the givers, and will be a great blessing to the receivers. Send your contributions at once to L. C. Chadwick, Box 2716, Williamsport, Penn., and they will be properly applied. E. J. WAGGONER.SITI June 24, 1889, page 295.195

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