Larger font
Smaller font
Copy
Print
Contents
  • Results
  • Related
  • Featured
No results found for: "".
    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents

    CATHOLIC AND METHODIST ST. PATRICK’S DAY

    A speech was delivered in Coate’s Opera House, Kansas City, Missouri, on St. Patrick’s day, March 17, 1896, by Dr. Mitchell, pastor of the leading Methodist Church of Kansas City. The Star speaks of a portion of the speech as “a dramatic little scene.“.” Dr. Mitchell was loudly applauded when he said this: “Bigotry is the child of ignorance. We are bigoted because we do not know our neighbors well enough. We Protestants have been taught to believe unutterable things of Catholics. Catholics have been taught to believe unutterable things of Protestants. Now we discover our mistaken notions of each other when we get close enough to look into each other’s eyes and clasp each other’s hands; if we only knew each other more we would love each other better. We have stood apart and criticized. Shame upon the followers of the blessed Christ! All Christians have been redeemed by the same precious blood; we are sustained by the same divine grace, and expect to reach the same heaven. Say, brothers, we had better be getting acquainted with each other down here.”PGGC 90.3

    Dr. Mitchell then turned to Father Dalton (Catholic priest), who sat just behind him, and, reaching out his hand, said, “Here, Brother Dalton, is my hand.” Father Dalton arose and clasped the extended hand, and as Dr. Mitchell shook it, he said: “It would be an awful shame if, after living so long in the same city on earth, we would have to get an angel to introduce us to each other in heaven. Let us get acquainted here on earth.” The audience applauded, and after Father Dalton sat down, Dr. Mitchell continued his speech. Let it be remembered that that audience was largely Protestant which joined in that vociferous cheering that followed this speech.PGGC 91.1

    The Church Federation of Protestant Churches, in 1905, sent to Cardinal Gibbons (Catholic) the ten points of their plan of operations. He replied that he “fully approved of their plans.”PGGC 92.1

    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents