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Historical Sketches of the Foreign Missions of the Seventh-day Adventists

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    A Swedish Home

    When we came to Stockholm we were taken to the home of Bro. Norlin, who, living near the meeting-hall, had secured extra rooms in order to entertain us. Neither he nor his wife could speak English; Bro. Matteson, who came with us from Copenhagen, acted as interpreter. But our good friends had just moved into a new brick house, which was not thoroughly dry; in some parts of the building the masons were still at work, and the chill and dampness rendered it unsafe for me to remain there, I thought of taking a room at a hotel for myself and Sister McEnterfer; but neither of us could speak the Swedish, and how were we to make our wants known? While we were thus in perplexity considering the situation, Sister Johanneson, who had lived in America and could speak English quite well, came in to invite us to her home. This invitation we gladly accepted. Her house was pleasantly situated on a hill in the suburbs of the city. A cosy little parlor on the third floor was appropriated to our use. I had become much reduced in strength by the pain I had endured and still continued to suffer from my teeth, and the rest and quiet of this home was very grateful.HS 189.2

    We were pleasantly surprised to find the table very much the same as at our Sanitarium at Battle Creek. The dishes were simple and healthful, and prepared with a skill and nicety that made them inviting and palatable. There is great need of a more general knowledge of the science of healthful cookery. There is a wide field of usefulness open to intelligent, experienced cooks in teaching young ladies how to prepare plain, simple food in a palatable and healthful manner.HS 190.1

    The rooms were warmed by tall, earthenware stoves, reaching nearly to the ceiling. These stoves are made square or round to suit the taste, of various colors, and many are more ornamental than our black iron stoves. The one in the family sitting-room was nearly square, and set in one side was a large gilt-framed mirror, not less than six feet long and half as wide. In the morning a wood fire is made, and when the fire is well under way, the doors may be opened, and we have a bright, cheerful blaze throwing out its heat into the room as from a fire-place. When the wood has burned down to a coal, the doors are shut, and the drafts closed. Thus the whole structure becomes heated, and retains its warmth all day. In most Swedish houses, one of these stoves is to be found in nearly every room except the kitchen.HS 190.2

    This sister's husband had not taken his stand on the truth, but his interest was with our people. He was a salesman in a large cloak and fur store, and, to all appearance, it would be impossible for him to keep the fourth commandment and retain his position.HS 190.3

    The Scandinavian children seem remarkably quiet and well trained. Wherever we went, they came forward, one by one, and shook hands with us, the girls making a courtesy, and the boys a low bow. Sister Johanneson's four children, from the girl of eight down to the three-year-old boy, welcomed us in this manner when we came; and whenever they met us, morning, noon, or evening, the greeting was repeated. At another place where we visited, even the little girl of two and a half years went through the ceremony with credit.HS 190.4

    Mr. Johanneson was training his children in singing, and we enjoyed the music of their little voices blending together in sacred songs. If parents generally would give more time to the education and training of their children, having really a home school for them, their families would be far happier. Children who are gifted with the talent or love of music may receive impressions that will be lifelong by a judicious use of these susceptibilities as the medium for religious instruction. Less time should be spent in the ornamentation of clothing, and far more attention should be given to making the character lovely. It is the inward adorning that will endure; the influences which give direction to these young lives will be far-reaching as eternity.HS 190.5

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