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An Address to the Public, and Especially the Clergy

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    SECTION V. THE TIME OF THE END, AND END ITSELF

    THE MEDO-PERSIAN AND MACEDONIAN KINGDOMS

    The prophecy of Daniel, in the 11th and 12th chapters, unlike the former, is communicated, not by prophetic emblems, but by direct revelation of the events of futurity. But, like the others, it furnishes us with a train of events, from the days of Daniel to the resurrection and glorification of the righteous.APEC 88.1

    In entering on the examination of this prophecy, I shall not dwell particularly on the first part of the 11th chapter, as it is so plain that there is little dispute as to its application, and a sufficient explanation may be found in most of the commentaries of the day. But on the latter part of the chapter I shall dwell more fully.APEC 88.2

    Daniel 11:2. “There shall stand up yet three kings in Persia.” This vision was in the third year of Cyrus, who was the then reigning monarch. After him reigned three other Persian kings, viz., Cambyses, Smerdis, and Darius Hystaspes. “The fourth shall be far richer than they all.” This rich king was Xerxes the Great. He was the richest of all the Persian monarchs. “He shall stir up all against the realm of Grecia.” His expedition against Greece is one of the most memorable wars of antiquity. His army and the followers of his camp are computed at 5,283,220 men. And as he was the last Persian king that invaded Greece, he is mentioned last, although there were eleven other kings who reigned after him on the Persian throne.APEC 88.3

    Verse 3. “A mighty king shall stand up,” etc. Expositors are all agreed that Alexander the Great is here predicted.APEC 89.1

    Verse 4. “His kingdom shall be broken and divided towards the four winds of heaven, and not to his posterity.”APEC 89.2

    In fifteen years after the death of Alexander, his entire family had become extinct; and there was none to inherit either his riches or glory. His kingdom was then divided among four of his generals. 1. Seleucus had Syria: 2. Lysimachus, Asia Minor: 3. Ptolemy possessed Egypt; 4. Cassander had Greece and the neighboring countries.APEC 89.3

    From the fifth to the fourteenth verse we have a very striking prophecy of the wars carried on between the king of the north, Syria, and the king of the south, Egypt. For an explanation of which, see Clarke.APEC 89.4

    Verse 14. “And in those times there shall many stand up against the king of the south, (Egypt;) also the robbers of thy people shall exalt themselves to establish the vision, but they shall fall.”APEC 89.5

    The times here spoken of, were after the death of Ptolemy Philopater, and while Ptolemy Epiphanes was a minor, only four or five years old. Antiochus, king of Syria, thought this a favorable time to invade and conquer Egypt. Accordingly, he engaged Philip, king of Macedon, in his interests, and also brought powerful forces from the east. Egypt itself also rebelled at the same time. Thus many stood up against the infant king of Egypt, with the design of conquering and dividing the kingdom between them. “The robbers of thy people shall exalt themselves.” “Whilst,” says Rollin, “they (Antiochus and Philip) were meditating to dispossess a weak and helpless infant of his kingdom by piece-meal, Providence raised up the Romans against them, who entirely subverted the kingdoms of Philip and Antiochus, and reduced their successors to almost as great calamities as those with which they intended to crush the infant king.” Thus they, Philip and Antiochus, who stood up against Egypt, fell.APEC 89.6

    Verses 15-19, continue the wars between the king of the north, Antiochus, and the king of the south, Egypt, until the death of Antiochus; when, verse 20, we are introduced again to the Roman history after the conquest of the four kingdoms of the Macedonian empire, and the assumption of the imperial form of government. Then shall stand up in his estate, “or on his base,” a raiser of taxes in the glory of the kingdom. This raiser of taxes, who inherited or stood “on the base” of those eastern kingdoms, was Augustus Cesar, the first Roman emperor. He stood in the height of the glory of the Roman dominions. He also made a decree that all the world should be taxed. Luke 2:1. In his estate there stood up a vile person, Tiberius Cesar, under whose reign the Prince of the covenant, Jesus Christ, was broken. Thus we are brought down to one of the grand points to which all the prophets point, the sacrificial death of the Savior.APEC 90.1

    Next, we are taken back to the union first formed between the people of God, the Jews, and the Romans, the last of the four great earthly kingdoms which should exist, and which is to continue to exist until the end.APEC 91.1

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