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Ellen G. White: The Early Years: 1827-1862 (vol. 1)

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    The “Review and Herald” Is Born

    When James and Ellen White took up residence in Paris, Maine, in late October, 1850, it was for the purpose of publishing the three angels’ messages. James had suspended the publication of the Present Truth while they made the itinerary to Vermont, Canada, and Maine, from mid-May to mid-July, and while he was publishing the first four numbers of the Advent Review at Auburn, New York. In early November at Paris, Maine, he picked up the Present Truth again and put out number 11. In this he stated, “The brethren may now expect to receive a few numbers,” and he called for those who could so do to write for the paper. He also brought out number 5 of the Advent Review, the final issue. It was devoted entirely to a reprint of portions of Joseph Bates's Second Advent Way Marks and High Heaps, a significant pamphlet reviewing the 1844 experience. Within a few days publishing plans changed. At the conference in Paris on Sabbath and Sunday, November 16 and 17, it was decided to combine the Present Truth and Advent Review into one journal. The new journal would be called The Second Advent Review and Sabbath Herald.1BIO 203.6

    The page size was 9 1/2 by 13 inches, as compared to the 7 3/4 by 10 inches for the Present Truth and the Advent Review. The masthead carried four names as the Publishing Committee: Joseph Bates, S. W. Rhodes, J. N. Andrews, and James White, and the subscription terms were “gratis, except the reader desires to aid in its publication.”1BIO 204.1

    In his initial editorial statement addressed “To Our Readers,” White declared:1BIO 204.2

    The Review and Herald is designed to be strictly confined to those important truths that belong to the present time. We hope to be able to send you this enlarged size of the paper quite often, containing a simple and clear exposition of those great and sanctifying truths embraced in the message of the third angel, viz.: the “commandments of God and the faith of Jesus.”—Ibid., November, 1850.1BIO 204.3

    Then the editor called for the names of those who will “candidly read.” He urged the distribution of publications available and notified all readers that the mailing lists of the Present Truth and the Advent Review were being used for this first number, but only those who responded as wishing the Review and Herald would be retained in making up the new list. Typically, he added:1BIO 204.4

    If any are not able to send means, we beseech them not to let this stop them from writing. We greatly desire to hear from such; and will cheerfully pay the postage on their letters.—Ibid.1BIO 204.5

    At that time, letter postage could be either prepaid or collected from the addressee.1BIO 205.1

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