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Ellen G. White: The Early Years: 1827-1862 (vol. 1)

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    Vision at Parkville, Michigan

    Just at this time light concerning what was ahead was given to Ellen White in a vision at Parkville, Michigan, on Sabbath afternoon, January 12, 1861. The summer before, J. N. Loughborough and J. N. Andrews, as noted earlier, held a rather extended tent meeting in Parkville, some thirty miles south of Battle Creek, which resulted in a large number accepting the third angel's message. A church building was soon erected and was to be dedicated on Sabbath, January 12. The leading members of that congregation appointed a general meeting commencing Friday, January 11, and through the Review invited Loughborough, J. H. Waggoner, James White, J. Byington, and “as many more as can come” to be with them (The Review and Herald, December 18, 1860). James and Ellen White accepted the invitation and with Loughborough and Waggoner drove from Battle Creek by carriage to be present for the weekend meetings. Loughborough describes the service Sabbath afternoon and the vision then given to Ellen White:1BIO 462.3

    A large congregation assembled. Brother Waggoner gave the sermon, and Brother White made the dedicatory prayer. Sister White followed with a very powerful exhortation. Then, as she sat down in the chair, she was taken off in vision, which lasted some twenty minutes or more.—Pacific Union Recorder, March 7, 1912.1BIO 463.1

    The congregation watched every move with intense interest. Most of those present had never seen her in vision. The vision over and Ellen White breathing again, she soon stood and told briefly of what had been revealed to her. An indelible impression was made on the minds of those in the audience. Later Loughborough recounted his memory of her statement:1BIO 463.2

    “Men are making light of the secession ordinance that has been passed by South Carolina. They have little idea of the trouble that is coming on our land. No one in this house has even dreamed of the trouble that is coming.1BIO 463.3

    “I have just been shown in vision that a number of States are going to join South Carolina in this secession, and a terrible war will be the result. In the vision I saw large armies raised by both the North and the South. I was shown the battle raging. I heard the booming of the cannon, and saw the dead and wounded falling on every side. I was then taken to hospitals, and saw the sufferings of the sick and wounded prisoners. I was taken in the vision to the homes of those who had lost sons, brothers, or husbands in the war. There was distress and mourning all over the land.”1BIO 463.4

    Then, looking pensively over the congregation, Ellen White declared:1BIO 463.5

    “There are men in this house who will lose sons in that war.”—Ibid.

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