Larger font
Smaller font
Copy
Print
Contents

Ellen G. White: The Early Years: 1827-1862 (vol. 1)

 - Contents
  • Results
  • Related
  • Featured
No results found for: "".
    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents

    Chapter 25—(1858-1859) Financial Support for the Cause of God

    The back page notice in the Ibid., September 30, 1858, signed by James White and J. N. Loughborough under the heading “Appointments” gave plans for meetings in Ohio and New York State in late September and most of October.1BIO 380.1

    Immediately following was a two-paragraph, rather illuminating notice signed by James White, laying out plans for a tour through New England. The notice suggested the very frail financial status of the cause, and the absence of organizational structure to direct the work. Leaders of the emerging church usually depended both on invitations to visit the field and the gifts of those who benefited from their ministry, to cover expenses. Note the wording:1BIO 380.2

    Brother and Sister White design spending October 23 and 24 at Buck's Bridge; the evening of the twenty-sixth near Rouse's Point, where Brethren Taylor and Whipple may appoint; the thirtieth and thirty-first, in Vermont, where Brethren Bingham and Churchill may appoint; November 6 and 7, near Washington, New Hampshire, where brethren may appoint; thirteenth and fourteenth, at Worcester, Massachusetts.1BIO 380.3

    If brethren in New England desire meetings as above, they will please give appointment of the definite place in the Review immediately, and address us at Hubbard's Corners, Madison County, New York. If they wish the labors of Brother J. N. Loughborough, they will please address him at the same place, and he will probably accompany us to the above-named places.1BIO 380.4

    As it turned out, the brethren in the East did want the Whites to come and invited Loughborough to come with them. When the tour was completed in mid-December, James White could report:1BIO 380.5

    Our wants were all cared for, our traveling expenses met, and we received the most affectionate and courteous attention.—Ibid., December 23, 18581BIO 381.1

    Earlier in the year Loughborough had run a back page note in the Review announcing cancellation of plans because of lack of financial support:1BIO 381.2

    Brother White and I had designed holding some four or five conferences in the State of New York this spring. But we would here state that our lack of means prevents our complying at present with the wishes of the brethren in this matter.—Ibid., April 1, 18581BIO 381.3

    The three-month-long fall tour taken by the Whites from Battle Creek east to Portland, Maine, and return, was a major part of their travels through the last half of 1858. Loughborough was with them for nearly all the appointments. Few details are given by White, except the names of the places visited. In later years, Loughborough, recounting history he was familiar with, mentioned the vision given to Ellen White in Mannsville, New York, in the public schoolhouse.1BIO 381.4

    The meeting was so well attended that to accommodate the crowds, oak planking obtained nearby was brought in and placed from seat to seat across the aisles, providing an audience in a solid block, with no open aisles. Loughborough was the speaker at that meeting. He later reported:1BIO 381.5

    The Lord gave freedom in the discourse. Sister White followed with a powerful talk. As she began to speak, their boy, W.C. (then about 4 years old), wanted to go out. The only way to do this was for Brother White to raise a window in the back part of the house. After putting the boy out, he followed him through the window.1BIO 381.6

    While he was out with the boy, Sister White spoke with great freedom. As she seated herself in her chair, she gave the three shouts of glory, and was in vision before that great crowd of people. When Brother White returned to the room, she was in the vision. He explained her condition to the people, who looked on with deepest respect. After coming out of the vision, she again spoke for a few minutes to that solemn and heart-touched audience.—Pacific Union Recorder, January 26, 1911.1BIO 381.7

    The next morning, October 21, she wrote with pencil a testimony, based on a part of what was revealed in the vision, to Stephen and Mary Haskell in Massachusetts. Then she requested Loughborough to make a good copy with pen and ink to be sent to them. As he copied this, his mind went back two years to the time when he and R. F. Cottrell held a tent meeting in Princeton, Massachusetts. He had met the Haskells there, and he recalled that Haskell was pressing the matter of the nonuse of pork. Because of its prohibition in Leviticus Haskell felt it should be made a test of church fellowship. Now Loughborough was tracing the lines from Ellen White's penciled testimony:1BIO 382.1

    I saw that your views concerning swine's flesh would prove no injury if you have them to yourselves; but in your judgment and opinion you have made this question a test, and your actions have plainly shown your faith in this matter. If God requires His people to abstain from swine's flesh, He will convict them on the matter.1BIO 382.2

    He is just as willing to show His honest children their duty, as to show their duty to individuals upon whom He has not laid the burden of His work. If it is the duty of the church to abstain from swine's flesh, God will discover it to more than two or three. He will teach His church their duty.1BIO 382.3

    God is leading out a people, not a few separate individuals here and there, one believing this thing, another that. Angels of God are doing the work committed to their trust. The third angel is leading out and purifying a people, and they should move with Him unitedly.... I saw that the angels of God would lead His people no faster than they could receive and act upon the important truths that are communicated to them. But some restless spirits do not more than half do up their work. As the angel leads them, they get in haste for something new, and rush on without divine guidance, and thus bring confusion and discord into the ranks. They do not speak or act in harmony with the body.—Testimonies for the Church, 1:206, 207.1BIO 382.4

    It was apparent that the time had not yet come to advocate certain positions in the matter of a reform in diet; this would come in its proper time and in its proper setting. In the second printing of this testimony, James White appended a significant note:1BIO 383.1

    This remarkable testimony was written October 21, 1858, nearly five years before the great vision in 1863, in which the light upon health reform was given. When the right time came, the subject was given in a manner to move all our people. How wonderful are the wisdom and goodness of God! It might be as wrong to crowd the milk, salt, and sugar question now, as the pork question in 1858.—JW, note to second edition, Ibid., 1:206.1BIO 383.2

    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents