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    “COOKING THE FRUIT

    “Nearly all varieties are better steamed than stewed or boiled, and this for three reasons; 1. The fruit is not so badly broken and mashed; 2. It retains more of its original flavor; and 3. Little or no water is required to be added, and it is therefore cooked in its own juice.SFCC 26.1

    “Almost every family has conveniences for steaming on a small scale, either with the common tin steamer, or the elevated platform, which can be used in a common kettle. To those who wish for more ample facilities, we would recommend the following cheap and simple method: Take a common wash-boiler, and have fitted into it a horizontal platform of sheet iron, perforated freely with half-inch holes, so as to allow the free passage of steam. Have it mounted upon legs, so it will stand clear from the water, which should be only a few inches deep in the bottom of the boiler.SFCC 26.2

    “Have your fruit carefully picked over, and placed in a clean, tin or earthen dish, with a cover over it to prevent the condensed steam from dropping into it. No sugar is required with any kind of fruit. We have informed by one who is always successful in this business, that the flavor of the fruit is better preserved without sugar; and she never lost a can. If sugar must be used, it can be added when the cans are opened for the table.SFCC 26.3

    “Place your dish of fruit on the platform of your steamer, having sufficient water in the bottom, but not too much. Then cover the whole closely, and steam until thoroughly scalded. Some kinds of fruit require a longer time than others, and judgment must be exercised in regard to the matter. It should not be cooked so as to fall to pieces, but care should be taken to have it thoroughly scalded.SFCC 26.4

    “While the fruit is cooking, the cans should be prepared. Have them thoroughly cleansed, and when ready to fill them, place the can upon a folded towel, wet in cold water.SFCC 27.1

    “The fruit may now be poured into the cans. Peaches, pears, or other large fruit, may be tastily arranged in the cans with a fork, piece by piece, and the boiling juice added afterward to cover them. When the can is full, shake it, and incline it back and forth, so as to cause the air to rise to the top, if any should be among the fruit. Be sure that the can is full to the brim, and then screw on the cover, or if not a self-sealing can, put in the cork, and cover with melted sealing-wax. The following recipe makes good wax: one pound of rosin, two ounces of beeswax, one and half ounces of mutton tallow. Melt and mix.SFCC 27.2

    “While placing the fruit in the cans, be careful to protect them from currents of air, as they are frequently broken by a simple draught of cold air.SFCC 27.3

    “All the above work should be performed expeditiously. The cans may then be set away to cool, and should be kept in a cool, dark place, and closely watched for a few days to see that the sealing is perfect. If the fruit shows signs of not being perfectly sealed, it should be at once taken out, scalded, and sealed again.SFCC 27.4

    “Tomatoes, berries, and small fruits, may be preserved in stone jugs. Observe the same rules in preparation, heating the jugs thoroughly before putting in the fruit. When filled, place one or two thicknesses of cloth over the mouth, and then put in the cork, covering the whole with wax.SFCC 27.5

    “By close attention to particulars, and the exercise of good judgment, success is almost certain.”SFCC 28.1

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