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    SOIL

    A deep, rich, sandy loam is the best soil for the Strawberry, but almost any soil can be made to produce the finest fruit. Even the heaviest clay can be prepared by a liberal admixture of sand or gravel, if the land is well drained from standing water.SFCC 5.1

    Says Fuller, in a work upon small fruits: “Thorough preparation of the soil is the very foundation of success; therefore no slovenly system, such as once plowing and harrowing, should be tolerated; but the ground should not only be plowed, but cross-plowed, and if not naturally deep, it should be subsoiled at least sixteen inches deep. If the cultivator will only bear in mind that one acre prepared in the best manner will produce more fruit than three or four acres fitted as is usually done, he will understand the importance of doing it well.”SFCC 5.2

    If early fruit is the object, a position sloping to the south should be selected. If late, a location sloping to the north.SFCC 5.3

    The soil should not be too highly manured, as the strength of the roots will then go to vines. As the object of cultivation is berries, a starved soil should not be selected, neither a very rich soil, but a medium. Land sufficiently rich to raise good corn or potatoes, is sufficiently rich for Strawberries, and the yield would often be very much diminished by further enriching.SFCC 5.4

    Ground as free as possible from weeds, roots, and seeds of all kinds, should be selected. New land, recently reclaimed from the forests, is preferable. If the land be low, or situated so that water will not immediately run off after each rain, it should be thoroughly drained. Heavy, wet land may be made fit for Strawberries by underdraining.SFCC 6.1

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