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    GENERAL REMARKS

    1. The cultivation of small fruits is a very pleasant employment, and if tastefully done, will have an elevating influence upon the mind. In this respect it is especially recommended to young men and young women. Parents in country, village, and city, will do well to interest even their small children in raising fruits. Their little hands can do much in plucking the weeds, and gathering the precious fruit.SFCC 28.2

    2. It is a profitable business. If the cultivation of small fruits be entered upon in a proper manner, it will prove one of the most profitable branches of business within the reach of those who cultivate the soil. And the increasing demand for fruits for table use, occasioned by radical changes of public opinion upon the subject of fruit, seems to warrant the suggestion that the greater the amount of fruit raised, the greater will be the demand.SFCC 28.3

    3. The change from meat-eating, to the free use of fruit in its place, is one of decided importance. It is a change, beneficial, physically, mentally, and morally. The American people are killing themselves with the excessive use of meat. And how poorly does man sympathize with the groaning creation, in slaughtering and devouring those creatures that God has made and given life. The squealing of swine, the squalling of fowls, the bleating and bellowing of sheep, calves, cows, and oxen, on butchering day, is all calculated to make men and women, naturally of pretty good heart, permanently brutal. Let the change come to the use of fruits, vegetables and grains, that God has made for food for man, that he may become milder in temper, clearer and more elevated in thought, and firmer in constitution, and physical strength.SFCC 28.4

    4. Every farmer, who really is farmer, should have an acre, at least, of small fruits. Five acres of corn are hardly enough to fatten hogs, beeves, and fowls, for a farmer’s table, under the common administration of pork, beef, mutton, turkey, and chicken. If these can and should be dispensed with, as not proper articles of food, cannot the farmer devote one of his many acres to God-given fruits, which are just what he needs on his table? We would be glad to arouse farmers on this subject; but the difficulty is, that many, in the press of farming, can see but little of importance but wheat, corn, potatoes, oats, hogs, turkeys, and chickens. Some can see a far greater delicacy in a pint of swine’s grease than in a quart of delicious berries. But the reform is going forward, and these farmers will soon rank small-fruit growing with their first and most important duties.SFCC 29.1

    5. We do not recommend too many varieties of the Strawberry, Raspberry, Blackberry, or of the Grape. The Wilson Strawberry, mixed with the Triomph de Gand, either every other row, or otherwise, is all the kinds most farmers need. The largest berries, the most on a square rod, and the best, we ever raised, was where these two varieties were completely mixed by mistake. The Wilson and Russell mixed may be equally good. While the Col. Ellsworth, Jucunda, and Agriculturist, are good alone almost anywhere. Those who wish to propagate plants for the market, may do well to obtain several kinds, pure and true to their kinds; but to simply raise berries for the family, two or three kinds are better than more.SFCC 29.2

    Doolittle’s Black Cap Raspberry bears about the same relation to the entire Raspberry race, as the Wilson and Triomph de Gand do to all sorts of Strawberries. We know of no one kind so good as the Doolittle.SFCC 30.1

    The Blackberry does well in Michigan, especially the hardy varieties. But we think it doubtful as to its success on the prairies of the Northwest, unless completely covered in winter. This can easily be done with dirt, or coarse dressing.SFCC 30.2

    It is of little use to plant the Grape anywhere, unless pruned to the end to raise berries instead of numerous vines and leaves. The grower can have many small vines and leaves, or he can have a fruit. We prefer the fruit. Therefore, we strictly follow directions before given. Two or three varieties for the private garden are better than more.SFCC 30.3

    6. If the Strawberry be set, the rows 42 inches apart, and the plants in the row 18 inches apart, it will require about 8000 plants to set one acre.SFCC 30.4

    Raspberries, in rows each way, 4´ feet apart, will take 2100 sets per acre.SFCC 30.5

    Blackberries, 6 feet each way, will require about, will require about 1200 per acre.SFCC 30.6

    Grapes, 7 feet each way, will take about 800 roots per acre.SFCC 30.7

    Those who design entering into fruit-raising quite abundantly, should at once furnish themselves with a sufficient amount of plants and roots to afford an immediate and a liberal supply of fruit for table use, and also to propagate plants and roots in abundance to supply themselves and others.SFCC 30.8

    We now propose to furnish the Strawberry plants, the Raspberry, Blackberry, and Grape, delivered at the Express Office, at Battle Creek, or at Ionia, Mich., at the following prices, 20 per cent discount to those who send cash with order. With preachers and personal friends, to whom we may feel indebted for past favors, we will make special arrangements, by letter, as to prices and time of payment. We wish to hear from such immediately. We do not design to trust any only personal friends and acquaintances, in whom we have perfect confidence in their ability and promptness to pay. The better way is to send cash with order, and save 20 per cent.SFCC 31.1

    These plants, roots, and vines can all be conveniently packed in the same box, and safely sent by express to any part of the country where there is an Express Office.SFCC 31.2

    We do not engage in the sale of fruit stock from a need, or a desire for profit; therefore fix prices as low as we safely can. Those who can furnish themselves as well nearer home, had better to do so, if they can feel sure of getting good plants. Our object is to instruct the people, and to assist those who need help.SFCC 31.3

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