Larger font
Smaller font
Copy
Print
Contents

From Trials to Triumph

 - Contents
  • Results
  • Related
  • Featured
No results found for: "".
    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents

    As a Prisoner, Paul Has Stronger Influence

    Many months passed by before the Jews of Jerusalem appeared to present their accusations against the prisoner. Now that Paul was to be tried before the highest tribunal of the Roman Empire, they had no desire to risk another defeat. Delay would afford them time to seek by intrigue to influence the emperor in their favor; so they waited a while before preferring their charges against the apostle.TT 240.2

    This delay resulted in the furtherance of the gospel. Paul was permitted to dwell in a commodious house, where he could present the truth daily to those who came to hear. Thus for two years he continued his labors, “preaching the kingdom of God and teaching about the Lord Jesus Christ quite openly and unhindered.”TT 240.3

    During this time the churches he had established in many lands were not forgotten. The apostle sought to meet their needs by letters of practical instruction, and from Rome he sent consecrated workers to labor in fields that he himself had not visited. The apostle, kept informed by constant communication with them, was able to exercise a wise supervision over all.TT 240.4

    Thus Paul exerted a wider and more lasting influence than if he had been free to travel among the churches as in former years. As a “prisoner for Jesus Christ,” he had a firmer hold on the affections of his brethren, and his words commanded greater attention and respect than when he was personally with them. Heretofore the believers had largely excused themselves from responsibility and burden bearing because they lacked his wisdom, tact, and indomitable energy; but now they prized his warnings and instructions as they had not prized his personal work. And as they learned of his courage and faith during his long imprisonment, they were stimulated to greater fidelity in the cause of Christ.TT 240.5

    At Rome, Luke, “the beloved physician,” who had attended him on the journey to Jerusalem, through the two years’ imprisonment at Caesarea, and on his perilous voyage to Rome, was with him still. Timothy also ministered to his comfort. Tychicus stood nobly by the apostle. Demas and Mark were with him. Aristarchus and Epaphras were his “fellow prisoners.” See Colossians 4:7-14.TT 241.1

    Mark's Christian experience had deepened as he had studied more closely the life and death of Christ. Now, sharing the lot of Paul the prisoner, he understood better than ever before that it is infinite gain to win Christ, infinite loss to win the world and lose the soul. In the face of severe trial, Mark continued steadfast, a wise and beloved helper of the apostle.TT 241.2

    Paul wrote, “Demas hath forsaken me, having loved this present world.” 2 Timothy 4:10. For worldly gain, Demas bartered every high and noble consideration. Mark, choosing to suffer for Christ's sake, possessed eternal riches.TT 241.3

    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents