Larger font
Smaller font
Copy
Print
Contents

From Trials to Triumph

 - Contents
  • Results
  • Related
  • Featured
No results found for: "".
    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents

    Chapter 24—Preaching the Power of the Cross in Corinth

    This chapter is based on Acts 18:1-18, RSV.

    Corinth was one of the leading cities of the world. Travelers from every land thronged its streets, intent on business and pleasure. It was an important place in which to establish memorials for God and His truth.TT 130.1

    Among the Jews who had taken up residence in Corinth were Aquila and Priscilla, earnest workers for Christ. Becoming acquainted with the character of these persons, Paul stayed and worked with them.TT 130.2

    In this thoroughfare of travel, Venus was the favorite goddess; and with the worship of Venus were connected many demoralizing rites. Even among the heathen, the Corinthians had become conspicuous for their gross immorality.TT 130.3

    In Corinth the apostle followed a course different from his labors in Athens, where he met logic with logic, philosophy with philosophy. He realized that his teaching in Athens had been productive of but little fruit. In his efforts to arrest the attention of the careless and indifferent in Corinth he determined to avoid elaborate arguments, and “to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ and Him crucified.” He would preach not “in plausible words of wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and power.” 1 Corinthians 2:2, 4, RSV.TT 130.4

    Jesus, whom Paul was about to present as the Christ, was reared in a town proverbial for its wickedness. He had been rejected by His own nation and at last crucified as a malefactor. The Greeks regarded philosophy and science as the only means of attaining to true elevation and honor. Could Paul lead them to believe that faith in this obscure Jew would uplift and ennoble every power of the being?TT 130.5

    To multitudes living at the present time, the cross of Calvary is surrounded by sacred memories. But in Paul's day the cross was regarded with horror. To uphold as the Saviour one who had met death on the cross would naturally call forth ridicule and opposition.TT 131.1

    Paul well knew how his message would be regarded. Jewish hearers would be angered. In the estimation of the Greeks his words would be absurd. How could the cross have any connection with the elevation of the race or the salvation of mankind?TT 131.2

    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents