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Life Sketches of Ellen G. White

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    Another Test of Faith

    As the school term advanced, and families gathered in so that their children might have its advantages, the Sabbath congregations became much too large for the temporary chapel above the dining-hall, in which seats had been provided for one hundred. In former years the Sabbath meetings had been held, first, in the dining-room of the Healey Hotel; and later on, in the dark, uncomfortable loft of the sawmill. The little chapel was a much better meeting-hall than the mill loft; but now it was too small. There was much discussion as to what could be done; and finally the brethren determined to erect a neat and commodious church, sufficiently large for the needs of all.LS 366.1

    Referring to this experience while speaking in the church during the week of prayer held in June, 1898, Mrs. White said:LS 366.2

    “When the time came for this meetinghouse to be built, there was another test of faith and loyalty. We had a council to consider what should be done. The way seemed hedged about with difficulties. Some said, ‘Inclose a small building, and when money shall come in, enlarge; for we cannot possibly complete at this time such a house as we desire.’ Others said, ‘Wait till we have money with which to build a commodious house.’ This we thought to do. But the word of the Lord came to me in the night season, ‘Arise, and build without delay.’LS 366.3

    “We then decided that we would take hold of the work, and walk out by faith to make a beginning. The very next night there came from South Africa a draft for two hundred pounds, ... to help us in building the meetinghouse. Our faith had been tested, we had decided to begin the work, and now the Lord put into our hands this large gift with which to begin. With this encouragement the work began in earnest. The school board gave the land and one hundred pounds, two hundred pounds was received from the Union Conference, and the members of the church gave what they could. Friends outside of the church helped; and the builders gave a part of their time, which was as good as money. Thus the work was completed, and we have this beautiful house, capable of seating four hundred people.” The Review and Herald, November 1, 1898.LS 367.1

    Meanwhile the school prospered, and a goodly number of young men and young women were prepared to enter the service of the Master. At the Queensland camp meeting, held in Brisbane October 14-24, 1898, Mrs. White reviewed this most encouraging feature of the development of the school, as follows:LS 367.2

    “During the first year, ... with an attendance of sixty students, there were about thirty who were over sixteen years of age; and from this number, ten were employed during the vacation in various branches of our religious work. During the second year, there were one hundred in attendance; and from among fifty who were over sixteen years of age, definite work was found for thirty-two during the vacation. Twenty-five of these were employed by the conferences and societies in religious work.” The Review and Herald, March 28, 1899.LS 367.3

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