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The Great Second Advent Movement: Its Rise and Progress

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    Who Stoutly Opposed the False Theory?

    Elder Turner began teaching his “no-more-mercy” doctrine in Paris, Maine, and for a little time had quite a following in that section of country. As there was such a complete shut door of access to the people outside of Adventists, whether professor or nonprofessor, many quite naturally drifted into Turner’s view of the subject.GSAM 221.1

    Lest the term Adventists should be misunderstood, we will hereafter speak of this people as First-day Adventists; and it was many of this class that were accepting Mr. Turner’s views. They had not as yet seen or heard the Sabbath truth, neither had they heard of the third angel’s message. It is of these that Mrs. White speaks thus in one of her publications:—GSAM 221.2

    “After the passing of the time of expectation in 1844, Adventists still believed the Saviour’s coming to be very near; they held that they had reached an important crisis, and that the work of Christ as man’s intercessor before God had ceased. Having given the warning of the judgment near, they felt that their work for the world was done, and they lost their burden of soul for the salvation of sinners, while the bold, blasphemous scoffing of the ungodly seemed to them another evidence that the Spirit of God had been withdrawn from the rejecters of his mercy. All this confirmed them in the belief that probation had ended, or, as they expressed it, ‘the door of mercy was shut.’ As has been stated, Adventists were for a short time united in the belief that the door of mercy was shut.” 15The Great Controversy, 429.GSAM 221.3

    In this quotation Mrs. White states the position taken by the First-day Adventists. She does not even intimate that she believed it. As shown above, the doctrine was first taught by Joseph Turner, at Paris, Maine. Mrs. White (then Miss Harmon) met Joseph Turner at the above-named place in the early spring of 1845, and heard him declare his doctrine of “no more manual labor for Adventists, and no more mercy for sinners,” and plainly told him he was “teaching a false doctrine; that there was still mercy for sinners, and for those who had not understandingly rejected the truth.”GSAM 222.1

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