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Noah Webster’s 1828 Dictionary

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    HOUP — HUMAN

    HOUP. [See Hoopoo.]

    HOUR, n. our. [L. hora; also L. tempestivus, from tempus. See Time. But hour, hora, afterward came to signify a certain portion or division of the day. This has been different in different nations.]

    1. A space of time equal to one twenty fourth part of the natural day, or duration of the diurnal revolution of the earth. An hour answers to fifteen degrees of the equator. It consists of 60 minutes, each minute of 60 seconds, etc.NWAD HOUR.2

    2. Time; a particular time; as the hour of death.NWAD HOUR.3

    Jesus saith, woman, my hour is not yet come. John 2:4.NWAD HOUR.4

    3. The time marked or indicated by a chronometer, clock or watch; the particular time of the day. What is the hour? At what hour shall we meet? I will be with you at an early hour.NWAD HOUR.5

    Good hour, signifies early or seasonably.NWAD HOUR.6

    You have arrived at a good hour.NWAD HOUR.7

    To keep good hours, to be at home in good season; not to be abroad late, or at the usual hours of retiring to rest.NWAD HOUR.8

    Hours, in the plural, certain prayers in the Romish church, to be repeated at stated times of the day, as matins and vespers.NWAD HOUR.9

    HOURGLASS, n. our’glass. A chronometer that measures the flux of time by the running of sand from one glass vessel to another, through a small aperture. Instead of sand, dry egg shells pulverized are sometimes used. The quantity of sand may be so proportioned as to measure an hour, a half hour, or a quarter.

    1. Space of time.NWAD HOURGLASS.2

    HOURHAND, n. The hand or pointed pin which shows the hour on a chronometer.

    HOURI, n. Among Mohammedans, a nymph of paradise.

    HOURLY, a. our’ly. Happening or done every hour; occurring hour by hour; frequent; often repeated.

    Observe the waning moon with hourly view.NWAD HOURLY.2

    1. Continual.NWAD HOURLY.3

    We must live in hourly expectation of having the troops recalled.NWAD HOURLY.4

    HOURLY, adv. our’ly. Every hour; frequently; continually.

    Great was their strife which hourly was renewed.NWAD HOURLY.6

    HOURPLATE, n. our’plate. The plate of a clock or other time-piece on which the hours are marked; the dial.

    HOUSAGE, n. [from house.] A fee for keeping goods in a house.

    HOUSE, n. hous. [L. casa; Heb. to put on, to cover.]

    1. In a general sense, a building or shed intended or used as a habitation or shelter for animals of any kind; but appropriately, a building or edifice for the habitation of man; a dwelling place, mansion or abode for any of the human species. It may be of any size and composed of any materials whatever, wood, stone, brick, etc.NWAD HOUSE.2

    2. An edifice or building appropriated to the worship of God; a temple; a church; as the house of God.NWAD HOUSE.3

    3. A monastery; a college; as a religious house.NWAD HOUSE.4

    4. The manner of living; the table.NWAD HOUSE.5

    He keeps a good house, or a miserable house.NWAD HOUSE.6

    5. In astrology, the station of a planet in the heavens, or the twelfth part of the heavens.NWAD HOUSE.7

    6. A family of ancestors; descendants and kindred; a race of persons from the same stock; a tribe. It particularly denotes a noble family or an illustrious race; as the house of Austria; the house of Hanover. So in Scripture, the house of Israel, or of Judah.NWAD HOUSE.8

    Two of a house few ages can afford.NWAD HOUSE.9

    7. One of the estates of a kingdom assembled in parliament or legislature; a body of men united in their legislative capacity, and holding their place by right or by election. Thus we say, the house of lords or peers of Great Britain; the house of commons; the house of representatives. In most of the United States, the legislatures consist of two houses, the senate, and the house of representatives or delegates.NWAD HOUSE.10

    8. The quorum of a legislative body; the number of representatives assembled who are constitutionally empowered to enact laws. Hence we say, there is a sufficient number of representatives present to form a house.NWAD HOUSE.11

    9. In Scripture, those who dwell in a house and compose a family; a household.NWAD HOUSE.12

    Cornelius was a devout man, and feared God with all his house. Acts 10:2.NWAD HOUSE.13

    10. Wealth; estate.NWAD HOUSE.14

    Ye devour widows’ houses. Matthew 23:14.NWAD HOUSE.15

    11. The grave; as the house appointed for all living. Job 30:23.NWAD HOUSE.16

    12. Household affairs; domestic concerns.NWAD HOUSE.17

    Set thy house in order. 2 Kings 20:1.NWAD HOUSE.18

    13. The body; the residence of the soul in this world; as our earthly house. 2 Corinthians 5:1.NWAD HOUSE.19

    14. The church among the Jews.NWAD HOUSE.20

    Moses was faithful in all his house. Hebrews 3:2.NWAD HOUSE.21

    15. A place of residence. Egypt is called the house of bondage. Exodus 13:3, 14.NWAD HOUSE.22

    16. A square, or division on a chess board.NWAD HOUSE.23

    HOUSE, v.t. houz. To cover from the inclemencies of the weather; to shelter; to protect by covering; as, to house wood; to house farming utensils; to house cattle.

    1. To admit to residence; to harbor.NWAD HOUSE.25

    Palladius wished him to house all the Helots.NWAD HOUSE.26

    2. To deposit and cover, as in the grave.NWAD HOUSE.27

    3. To drive to a shelter.NWAD HOUSE.28

    HOUSE, v.i. houz. To take shelter or lodgings; to keep abode; to reside.

    To house with darkness and with death.NWAD HOUSE.30

    1. To have an astrological station in the heavens.NWAD HOUSE.31

    Where Saturn houses.NWAD HOUSE.32

    HOUSEBOAT, n. hous’boat. A covered boat.

    HOUSEBOTE, n. hous’bote.

    1. In law, a sufficient allowance of wood to repair the house and supply fuel.NWAD HOUSEBOTE.2

    HOUSE-BREAKER, n. house’-breaker. One who breaks, opens and enters a house by day with a felonious intent, or one who breaks or opens a house, and steals therefrom, by daylight.

    HOUSE-BREAKING, n. hous’-breaking. The breaking, or opening and entering of a house by daylight, with the intent to commit a felony, or to steal or rob. The same crime committed at night is burglary.

    HOUSEDOG, n. hous’dog. A dog kept to guard the house.

    HOUSEHOLD, n. hous’hold. Those who dwell under the same roof and compose a family; those who belong to a family.

    I baptized also the household of Stephanus. 1 Corinthians 1:16.NWAD HOUSEHOLD.2

    1. Family life; domestic management.NWAD HOUSEHOLD.3

    HOUSEHOLD, a. hous’hold. Belonging to the house and family; domestic; as household furniture; household affairs.

    HOUSEHOLDER, n. hous’holder. The master or chief of a family; one who keeps house with his family. Matthew 13:27, 52.

    HOUSEHOLD-STUFF, n. hous’hold-stuff. The furniture of a house; the vessels, utensils and goods of a family.

    HOUSEKEEPER, n. hous’keeper. One who occupies a house with his family; a man or woman who maintains a family; a man or woman who maintains a family state in a house; a householder; the master or mistress of a family.

    1. A female servant who has the chief care of the family and superintends the other servants.NWAD HOUSEKEEPER.2

    2. One who lives in plenty. [Not in use.]NWAD HOUSEKEEPER.3

    3. One who keeps much at home. [Not used.]NWAD HOUSEKEEPER.4

    4. A housedog. [Not used.]NWAD HOUSEKEEPER.5

    HOUSEKEEPING, a. hous’keeping. Domestic; used in a family; as housekeeping commodities. [Little used.]

    HOUSEKEEPING, n. [As above.] The family state in a dwelling.

    1. Hospitality; a plentiful and hospitable table. [Not used in U. States.]NWAD HOUSEKEEPING.3

    HOUSEL, n. houz’l. The eucharist; the sacred bread.

    HOUSEL, v.t. To give or receive the eucharist.

    HOUSELAMB, n. hous’lamb. A lamb kept in a house for fatting.

    HOUSELEEK, n. hous’leek. [See Leek.] A plant of the genus Sempervivum, which is found on the tops of houses. The lesser houseleek is of the genus Sedum.

    HOUSELESS, n. hous’less. Destitute of a house or habitation; as the houseless child of want.

    1. Destitute of shelter.NWAD HOUSELESS.2

    HOUSELINE, HOUSING, n. Among seamen, a small line formed of three strands, smaller than rope-yard, used for seizings, etc.

    HOUSEMAID, n. hous’maid. A female servant employed to keep a house clean, etc.

    HOUSEPIGEON, n. A tame pigeon.

    HOUSEROOM, n. hous’room. Room or place in a house.

    HOUSERAISER, n. One who erects a house.

    HOUSESNAIL, n. A particular kind of snail.

    HOUSEWARMING, n. hous’warming. A feast or merry making at the time a family enters a new house.

    HOUSEWIFE, n. hous’wife. [house and wife; contracted into huswife, hussy.] The mistress of a family.

    1. A female economist; a good manager.NWAD HOUSEWIFE.2

    2. One skilled in female business.NWAD HOUSEWIFE.3

    3. A little case or bag for articles of female work.NWAD HOUSEWIFE.4

    HOUSEWIFELY, a. hous’wifely. Pertaining to the mistress of a family.

    1. Taken from housewifery, or domestic affairs; as a housewifely metaphor.NWAD HOUSEWIFELY.2

    HOUSEWIFERY, n. hous’wifery. The business of the mistress of a family; female business in the economy of a family; female management of domestic concerns.

    HOUSE-WRIGHT, n. hous’wright. An architect who builds houses.

    HOUSED, pp. s as z. Put under cover; sheltered.

    HOUSING, ppr. s as z. Covering; sheltering.

    1. Warped; crooked, as a brick.NWAD HOUSING.2

    HOUSING, n. Houses in general.

    1. A cloth laid over a saddle.NWAD HOUSING.4

    2. A piece of cloth fastened to the hinder part of a saddle, and covering the horse’s croup; called also boot-housing.NWAD HOUSING.5

    3. [See Houseline.]NWAD HOUSING.6

    HOUSLING, a. [See Housel.] Sacramental; as housling fire, used in the sacrament of marriage.

    HOUSS, a covering. [See Housing.]

    HOVE, pret. of heave.

    HOVEL, n. A shed; a cottage; a mean house.

    HOVEL, v.t. To put in a hovel; to shelter.

    HOVEN, pp. of heave.

    HOVER, v.i.

    1. To flap the wings, as a fowl; to hang over or about, fluttering or flapping the wings, with short irregular flights.NWAD HOVER.2

    Great flights of birds are hovering about the bridge, and settling on it.NWAD HOVER.3

    2. To hang over or around, with irregular motions.NWAD HOVER.4

    A hovering mist came swimming o’er his sight.NWAD HOVER.5

    3. To stand in suspense or expectation.NWAD HOVER.6

    4. To wander about from place to place in the neighborhood; to move back and forth; as an army hovering on our borders; a ship hovering on our coast.NWAD HOVER.7

    HOVER, n. A protection or shelter by hanging over.

    HOVER-GROUND, n. Light ground.

    HOVERING, ppr. Flapping the wings; hanging over or around; moving with short irregular flights.

    HOW, adv. In what manner. I know not how to answer.

    How can a man be born when he is old?NWAD HOW.2

    How can these things be? John 3:9.NWAD HOW.3

    1. To what degree or extent. How long shall we suffer these indignities? How much better is wisdom than gold!NWAD HOW.4

    O how love I thy law! How sweet are thy words to my taste. Psalm 119:97, 103.NWAD HOW.5

    2. For what reason; from what cause.NWAD HOW.6

    How now, my love, why is your cheek so pale?NWAD HOW.7

    3. By what means. How can this effect by produced?NWAD HOW.8

    4. In what state.NWAD HOW.9

    How, and with what reproach shall I return!NWAD HOW.10

    5. It is used in a sense marking proportion; as how much less; how much more.NWAD HOW.11

    Behold, he putteth no trust in his servants--how much less in them that dwell in houses of clay-- Job 4:19.NWAD HOW.12

    By how much they would diminish the present extent of the sea, so much they would impair the fertility and fountains and rivers of the earth.NWAD HOW.13

    6. It is much used in exclamation.NWAD HOW.14

    How are the mighty fallen! 2 Samuel 1:19.NWAD HOW.15

    7. In some popular phrases, how is superfluous or inelegant.NWAD HOW.16

    Thick clouds put us in some hope of land; knowing how that part of the South Sea was utterly unknown.NWAD HOW.17

    HOWBEIT, adv. [how, be, and it.] Be it as it may; nevertheless; notwithstanding; yet; but; however.

    HOWDY, n. A midwife. [Local.]

    HOW DYE, how do you? how is your health?

    HOWEVER, adv. [how and ever.] In whatever manner or degree; as, however good or bad style may be.

    1. At all events; at least.NWAD HOWEVER.2

    Our chief end is to be freed from all, if it may be, however, from the greatest evils.NWAD HOWEVER.3

    2. Nevertheless; notwithstanding; yet. I shall not oppose your design; I cannot however approve of it.NWAD HOWEVER.4

    You might howe’er have took a fairer way.NWAD HOWEVER.5

    HOWITZ, HOWITZER, n. A kind of mortar or short gun, mounted on a field carriage, and used for throwing shells. The difference between a mortar and a howitz is that the trunnions of a mortar are at the end, but those of a howitz are at the middle.

    HOWKER, n. A Dutch vessel with two masts, a main and a mizen-mast; also, a fishing boat with one mast, used on the coast of Ireland.

    HOWL, v.i. [L. ululo.]

    1. To cry as a dog or wolf; to utter a particular kind of loud, protracted and mournful sound. We say, the dog howls; the wolf howls. Hence,NWAD HOWL.2

    2. To utter a loud, mournful sound, expressive of distress; to wail.NWAD HOWL.3

    Howl lye, for the day of the Lord is at hand. Isaiah 13:6.NWAD HOWL.4

    Ye rich men, weep and howl. James 5:1.NWAD HOWL.5

    3. To roar; as a tempest.NWAD HOWL.6

    HOWL, v.t. To utter or speak with outcry.

    Go--howl it out in deserts.NWAD HOWL.8

    HOWL, n. The cry of a dog or wolf, or other like sound.

    1. The cry of a human being in horror or anguish.NWAD HOWL.10

    HOWLET, n. A fowl of the owl kind, which utters a mournful cry. It is as large as a pullet.

    HOWLING, ppr. Uttering the cry of a dog or wolf; uttering a loud cry of distress.

    HOWLING, a. Filled with howls, or howling beasts; dreary.

    Innumerable artifices and stratagems are acted in the howling wilderness and in the great deep, that can never come to our knowledge.NWAD HOWLING.3

    HOWLING, n. The act of howling; a loud outcry or mournful sound.

    HOWSOEVER, adv. [how, so, and ever.]

    1. In what manner soever.NWAD HOWSOEVER.2

    2. Although.NWAD HOWSOEVER.3

    [For this word, however is generally used.]NWAD HOWSOEVER.4

    HOX, v.t. To hough; to hamstring. [Not used. See Hough.]

    HOY, n. A small vessel, usually rigged as a sloop, and employed in conveying passengers and goods from place to place on the sea coast, or in transporting goods to and from a ship in a road or bay.

    HOY, an exclamation, of no definite meaning.

    HUB. [See Hob.]

    HUBBUB, n. A great noise of many confused voices; a tumult; uproar; riot.

    HUCK, v.i. To haggle in trading. [Not in use.]

    HUCK, n. The name of a German river-trout.

    HUCKABACK, n. A kind of linen with raised figures on it.

    HUCKLE, n. [infra.] The hip, that is, a bunch.

    HUCKLEBACKED, a. Having round shoulders.

    HUCKLEBONE, n. The hip bone.

    HUCKSTER, n.

    1. A retailer of small articles, of provisions, nuts, etc.NWAD HUCKSTER.2

    2. A mean trickish fellow.NWAD HUCKSTER.3

    HUCKSTER, v.i. To deal in small articles, or in petty bargains.

    HUCKSTERESS, n. A female peddlar.

    HUD, n. The shell or hull of a hut.

    HUDDLE, v.i.

    1. To crowd; to press together promiscuously, without order or regularity. We say of a throng of people, they huddle together.NWAD HUDDLE.2

    2. To move in a promiscuous throng without order; to press or hurry in disorder. The people huddle along, or huddle into the house.NWAD HUDDLE.3

    HUDDLE, v.t. To put on in haste and disorder; as, she huddled on her clothes.

    1. To cover in haste or carelessly.NWAD HUDDLE.5

    2. To perform in haste and disorder.NWAD HUDDLE.6

    3. To throw together in confusion; to crowd together without regard to order; as, to huddle propositions together.NWAD HUDDLE.7

    HUDDLE, n. A crowd; a number of persons or things crowded together without order or regularity; tumult; confusion.

    HUDDLED, pp. Crowded together without order.

    HUDDLING, ppr. Crowding or throwing together in disorder; putting on carelessly.

    HUE, n. Color; dye.

    Flow’rs of all hue.NWAD HUE.2

    HUE, in the phrase hue and cry, signifies a shouting or vociferation. In law, a hue and cry is the pursuit of a felon or offender, with loud outcries or clamor to give an alarm.

    HUER, n. One whose business is to cry out or give an alarm. [Not in use.]

    HUFF, n.

    1. A swell of sudden anger or arrogance.NWAD HUFF.2

    A Spaniard was wonderfully upon the huff about his extraction.NWAD HUFF.3

    2. A boaster; one swelled with a false opinion of his own value or importance.NWAD HUFF.4

    Lewd shallow-brained huffs make atheism and contempt of religion the badge of wit.NWAD HUFF.5

    HUFF, v.t. To swell; to enlarge; to puff up.

    1. To hector; to bully; to treat with insolence and arrogance; to chide or rebuke with insolence.NWAD HUFF.7

    HUFF, v.i. To swell; to dilate or enlarge; as, the bread huffs.

    1. To bluster; to swell with anger, pride or arrogance; to storm.NWAD HUFF.9

    This arrogant conceit made them huff at the doctrine of repentance.NWAD HUFF.10

    A huffing, shining, flattering, cringing coward.NWAD HUFF.11

    HUFFED, pp. Swelled; puffed up.

    HUFFER, n. A bully; a swaggerer; a blusterer.

    HUFFINESS, n. Petulance; the state of being puffed up.

    HUFFING, ppr. Swelling; puffing up; blustering.

    HUFFISH, a. Arrogant; insolent; hectoring.

    HUFFISHLY, adv. With arrogance or blustering.

    HUFFISHNESS, n. Arrogance; petulance; noisy bluster.

    HUFFY, a. Swelled or swelling; petulant.

    HUG, v.t.

    1. To press close in an embrace.NWAD HUG.2

    --And hugged me in his arms.NWAD HUG.3

    2. To embrace closely; to hold fast; to treat with fondness.NWAD HUG.4

    We hug deformities, if they bear our names.NWAD HUG.5

    3. To gripe in wrestling or scuffling.NWAD HUG.6

    To hug the land, in sailing, to sail as near the land as possible.NWAD HUG.7

    To hug the wind, to keep the ship close-hauled.NWAD HUG.8

    HUG, n. A close embrace.

    1. A particular gripe in wrestling or scuffling.NWAD HUG.10

    HUGE, a.

    1. Very large or great; enormous; applied to bulk or size; as a huge mountain; a huge ox.NWAD HUGE.2

    2. It is improperly applied to space and distance, in the sense of great, vast, immense; as a hugh space; a hugh difference. This is inelegant, or rather vulgar.NWAD HUGE.3

    3. In colloquial language, very great; enormous; as a huge feeder.NWAD HUGE.4

    HUGELY, adv. Very greatly; enormously; immensely.

    Doth it not flow as hugely as the sea?NWAD HUGELY.2

    HUGENESS, n. Enormous bulk or largeness; as the hugeness of a mountain or of an elephant.

    HUGGER-MUGGER, n. [Hugger contains the elements of hug and hedge, and mugger, those of smoke.]

    In hugger-mugger, denotes in privacy or secrecy, and the word adverbially used, denotes secretly. [It is a low cant word.]NWAD HUGGER-MUGGER.2

    HUGUENOT, n. A name formerly given to a protestant in France.

    HUGUENOTISM, n. The religion of the Huguenots in France.

    HUGY, a. [from huge.] Vast in size. [Not used.]

    HUISHER, n. An usher. [See Usher.]

    HUKE, n. A cloke; a hyke.

    HULCH, n. A bunch. [Not used.]

    HULCHIS, a. Swelling; gibbous. [Not used.]

    HULK, n.

    1. The body of a ship, or decked vessel of any kind; but the word is applied only to the body of an old ship or vessel which is laid by as unfit for service. A sheer-hulk is an old ship fitted with an apparatus to fix or take out the masts of a ship.NWAD HULK.2

    2. Any thing bulky or unwieldy. [Not used.]NWAD HULK.3

    HULK, v.t. To take out the entrails; as, to hulk a hare. [Little used.]

    HULKY, a. Bulky; unwieldy. [Not used.]

    HULL, n.

    1. The outer covering of any thing, particularly of a nut or of grain. Johnson says, the hull of a nut covers the shell.NWAD HULL.2

    2. The frame or body of a ship, exclusive of her masts, yards and rigging.NWAD HULL.3

    To lie a hull, in seamen’s language, is to lie as a ship without any sail upon her, and her helm lashed a-lee.NWAD HULL.4

    To strike a hull, in a storm, is to take in the sails, and lash the helm on the lee-side of a ship.NWAD HULL.5

    HULL, v.t. To strip off or separate the hull or hulls; as, to hull grain.

    1. To pierce the hull of a ship with a cannon-ball.NWAD HULL.7

    HULL, v.i. To float or drive on the water without sails.

    HULLY, a. Having husks or pods; siliquous.

    HULOTHEISM, n. [Gr. matter, and God.] The doctrine or belief that matter is God, or that there is no God, except matter and the universe.

    HULVER, n. Holly, a tree.

    HUM, v.i. To utter the sound of bees; to buzz.

    1. To make an inarticulate buzzing sound.NWAD HUM.2

    The cloudy messenger turns me his back,NWAD HUM.3

    And hums--NWAD HUM.4

    2. To pause in speaking, and make an audible noise like the humming bees.NWAD HUM.5

    He hummed and hawed.NWAD HUM.6

    3. To make a dull, heavy noise like a drone.NWAD HUM.7

    Still humming, on their drowsy course they took.NWAD HUM.8

    4. To applaud.NWAD HUM.9

    HUM, v.t. To sing in a low voice; as, to hum a tune.

    1. To cause to hum; to impose on.NWAD HUM.11

    HUM, n. The noise of bees or insects.

    1. A low confused noise, as of crowds; as the busy hum of men.NWAD HUM.13

    2. Any low dull noise.NWAD HUM.14

    3. A low inarticulate sound, uttered by a speaker in a pause; as hums and haws.NWAD HUM.15

    4. An expression of applause.NWAD HUM.16

    HUM, exclam. A sound with a pause, implying doubt and deliberation.

    HUMAN, a. [L. humanus; Heb. form, species.]

    1. Belonging to man or mankind; pertaining or relating to the race of man; as a human voice; human shape; human nature; human knowledge; human life.NWAD HUMAN.2

    2. Having the qualities of a man.NWAD HUMAN.3

    3. Profane; not sacred or divine; as a human author. [Not in use.]NWAD HUMAN.4

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